Larry Lagut

Member for
9 years · 2 months · 8 days
Find a Grave ID
47613611

Bio

USING PERIOD IN THE MEMORIAL NAME

I got some imformation on how to use the period in the memorial name.

Dee Winter informed me on the rule by FAG of how to use the period in the name . Her personal rule , which is also my personal rule to which I tend to fellow is if the middle initial is use it advisable to put a period their.
Memorial Naming Conventions: Non-famous Memorials
If a hyphen, period or an apostrophe is part of the name, use the punctuation. If the full name is known, use the full name and not the initial. Suffixes, Prefixes, Titles, or honorary do not belong in any Name Field.

Middle Name
Middle name of deceased. Put the entire middle name (if known), even if the grave marker is only an initial.
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COINS LEFT ON TOMBSTONE

While visiting some cemeteries you may notice that headstones marking certain graves have coins on them, left by previous visitors to the grave.

These coins have distinct meanings when left on the headstones of those who gave their life while serving in America's military, and these meanings vary depending on the denomination of coin.

A coin left on a headstone or at the grave site is meant as a message to the deceased soldier's family that someone else has visited the grave to pay respect. Leaving a penny at the grave means simply that you visited.

A nickel indicates that you and the deceased trained at boot camp together, while a dime means you served with him in some capacity. By leaving a quarter at the grave, you are telling the family that you were with the solider when he was killed.

According to tradition, the money left at graves in national cemeteries and state veterans cemeteries is eventually collected, and the funds are put toward maintaining the cemetery or paying burial costs for Section
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From Find A Grave member LKat's profile page I have copied the following statement that I totally agree with. I do make an exception for a member of the military that has died during combat. That is the only case where I add the rank of a person buried in a national cemetery.

ADDING THE RANK TO A MEMORIAL
Use of one's former rank by non-retired military personnel is not a prescribed usage by the Department of Defense (DoD). Use of rank is reserved for career 20-year retirees -- with the intention that their use of the rank is for personal social use -- and is not for use subsequent civilian work-related situations.
In a bio or in a resume the service to our nation would be included as
part of one's experience -- it's just using the rank as part of one's
name the DoD specifically prohibits.

THE BUGLER TAPS AT THE FUNERAL

all began in 1862 during the Civil War, when Union Army Captain Robert Elli was with his men near Harrison's Landing in Virginia. The Confederate Army was on the other side of the narrow strip of land.
During the night, Captain Elli heard the moans of a soldier who lay severely wounded on the field. Not knowing if it was a Union or Confederate soldier, the Captain decided to risk his life and bring the stricken man back for medical attention. Crawling on his stomach through the gunfire, the Captain reached the stricken soldier and began pulling him toward his encampment..
When the Captain finally reached his own lines, he discovered it was actually a Confederate soldier, but the soldier was dead.
The Captain lit a lantern and suddenly caught his breath and went numb with shock. In the dim light, he saw the face of the soldier. It was his own son. The boy had been studying music in the South when the war broke out.. Without telling his father, the boy enlisted in the Confederate Army.
The following morning, heartbroken, the father asked permission of his superiors to give his son a full military burial, despite his enemy status. His request was only partially granted.
The Captain had asked if he could have a group of Army band members play a funeral dirge for his son at the funeral.
The request was turned down since the soldier was a Confederate.
But, out of respect for the father, they did say they could give him only one musician.
The Captain chose a bugler. He asked the bugler to play a series of musical notes he had found on a piece of paper in the pocket of the dead youth's uniform.
This wish was granted.
The haunting melody, we now know as 'Taps' used at military funerals was born.
The words are:

Day is done.
Gone the sun.
From the lakes
From the hills.
From the sky.
All is well.
Safely rest.
God is nigh.

Fading light.
Dims the sight.
And a star.
Gems the sky.
Gleaming bright.
From afar.
Drawing nigh.
Falls the night.

Thanks and praise.
For our days.
Neath the sun
Neath the stars.
Neath the sky
As we go.
This we know.
God is nigh
I too have felt the chills while listening to 'Taps' but I have never seen all the words to the song until now. I didn't even know there was more than one verse . I also never knew the story behind the song and I didn't know if you had either so I thought I'd pass it along.
I now have an even deeper respect for the song than I did before.
Remember Those Lost and Harmed While Serving Their Country.
Also Remember Those Who Have Served And Returned; and for those presently serving in the Armed Forces.



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