SweetCarolineage

Member for
9 years 3 months 26 days
Find a Grave ID

Bio

Perhaps you are searching among the branches for what can only be found in the roots."
-Rumi

This page is dedicated primarily to family genealogy. Lineages of interest include Cloud, Flanagin, Hoover, James, Lanier, McWhorter, Pridmore, and Sinclair.

Descriptions below are largely reproduced from 3rd party sources; diligence is advised on accepting their validity.

James

Recorded in over sixty spelling forms, and found throughout Christian nations, this very interesting medieval surname is of both Biblical and 12th century Crusader origins. These are confused, and like the personal name and subsequent surname Jacob, it has its origins in the Hebrew given name "Yaakov". This was Latinized in the Roman Period of history, first as Jacobus, and then in the period known as "The Dark Ages" up to the 11th century a.d., as Jacomus. The actual meaning of the name is also a matter for some dispute. Traditionally the name is interpreted as coming from the word "akev", meaning a heel, but has also been interpreted as "he who supplanted". Both of these meanings are influenced by the biblical story of Esau and his younger twin brother Jacob. Jacob is said to have been born holding on to Esau's heel, and took advantage of Esau's hunger to persuade him to part with his birthright "for a mess of pottage". For a name with such indistinct origins, it has proved to be a great success story, with spellings ranging from James, Jayume, and Jamie, to Giacomo, Comi, Comiam, Cominetto, Motto, and even Gimson! The first recordings are to be found in England, because England was the first country to adopt both surnames and to properly register them. Examples from early charters include Christiana Jemes of Cambridge, in the Hundred Rolls of the year 1279, whilst one of the first settlers to the new colony of Virginia in the Americas, was Lewis James, who left London, on August 21st 1635. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Walter James. This was dated 1187, in the Pipe Rolls of the county of Gloucestershire, during the reign of King Henry 11nd, 1154 - 1189.

James is a very common surname in the United States and has been most prevalent in the Southeast, though the name is actually most common in Alaska.

McWhorter

Recorded in several forms including MacWhirter, McWhirter, MacChruiter, McChruiter, McQuarter, McQuirter, and even Mewhirter, this is a surname of medieval Gaelic origins. It is generally considered to be Scottish, but we have some reservations, as the earliest known recordings seem to be from Ireland. What is certain is that if the name is Scottish, Ayrshire on the west coast would seem to be the place of origin, but that in its different forms it is equally popular in the Irish counties of Armagh and Antrim. The derivation is clearly from the ancient Gaelic word "cruiteir" meaning a harper or harpist, a word which appeared equally in early records of both Ireland and Scotland. As such the surname is a metonymic or nickname for a musician. According to some authorities the nameholders belong to the Clan Buchanan, and were hereditary harpists to the chiefs of the clan. This is possible although the Buchanans originate from Stirling, quite some way in earlier times, from Ayr. It is also rather curious that whilst the name is recorded in Northern Ireland as early as 1684, the first recording that we have in Scotland is not until 1749, when Andrew M'Whiter of Kirkhobble, is so recorded. The name appears in the records of the state of New Jersey in 1734, when Alexander McWhorter was born at Newark. He was an active participant in the later War of Independance (1776 - 1781). The name is now much associated with the famous Guiness Book of Records edited by Norris McWhirter.

McWhorter is a moderately common surname in the United States and most prevalent in the Southeast, especially in Georgia.

Pridmore

The Pridmore surname is of Medieval English origin and is locational from a so called 'lost' village, likely to have once been situated in Northamptonshire, which is suggested by the fact that there are numerous recordings of this surname in that county. The derivation is from the Welsh 'Pridd', meaning earth, soil and the Old English pre 7th Century 'mor', upland. The phenomenon of the 'lost' village was a result of enforced land clearance in the 12th and 13th Centuries to make way for sheep pasture, as well as the more natural causes such as plague, and war. These dispossessed people, along with those seeking work farther afield, would often adopt the village name as a means of identification, thus resulting in a wide dispersal of the name. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Erasnus Pridmore, marriage to Elizabeth Mears, which was dated February 2nd 1641, St. Nicholas, Cole Abbey, London, during the reign of King Charles 1, 'The Martyr', 1625-1649.

While Pridmore is an uncommon surname in the United States, it is most prevalent in the Southeast, specifically, Alabama.

Sinclair

The following excerpt was published in the Independent Press-Telegram (Long Beach, California), 08 February 1959, Sunday Edition, Page 64

The SINCLAIRS go back to Woldernus, Count de Saint Clair, of Normandy, France, who entered England with the 11th century Norman conquerors of Britain. His descendant William de St. Clair was granted the baronial estate of Roslin in the Scotch county of Midlothian in A.D. 1150. Other descendants lived in Suffolk, England. The town and estate of Saint Clair, Normandy, were named for Saint Clair, a 3rd century bishop of Nantes. “Clair,” a given name, meant “illustrious one.” The French surname Saint was altered to Sinclair in Scotland and England. Sir William Sinclair died in 1329 fighting the Moors in Spain. He was accompanying Sir James Douglas, to whom was entrusted the heart of the Scotch hero-king Robert Bruce, for burial in the Holy Land. The Sinclair coat-of-arms has a ship at anchor with furled sails, centered on a blue shield.

Perhaps you are searching among the branches for what can only be found in the roots."
-Rumi

This page is dedicated primarily to family genealogy. Lineages of interest include Cloud, Flanagin, Hoover, James, Lanier, McWhorter, Pridmore, and Sinclair.

Descriptions below are largely reproduced from 3rd party sources; diligence is advised on accepting their validity.

James

Recorded in over sixty spelling forms, and found throughout Christian nations, this very interesting medieval surname is of both Biblical and 12th century Crusader origins. These are confused, and like the personal name and subsequent surname Jacob, it has its origins in the Hebrew given name "Yaakov". This was Latinized in the Roman Period of history, first as Jacobus, and then in the period known as "The Dark Ages" up to the 11th century a.d., as Jacomus. The actual meaning of the name is also a matter for some dispute. Traditionally the name is interpreted as coming from the word "akev", meaning a heel, but has also been interpreted as "he who supplanted". Both of these meanings are influenced by the biblical story of Esau and his younger twin brother Jacob. Jacob is said to have been born holding on to Esau's heel, and took advantage of Esau's hunger to persuade him to part with his birthright "for a mess of pottage". For a name with such indistinct origins, it has proved to be a great success story, with spellings ranging from James, Jayume, and Jamie, to Giacomo, Comi, Comiam, Cominetto, Motto, and even Gimson! The first recordings are to be found in England, because England was the first country to adopt both surnames and to properly register them. Examples from early charters include Christiana Jemes of Cambridge, in the Hundred Rolls of the year 1279, whilst one of the first settlers to the new colony of Virginia in the Americas, was Lewis James, who left London, on August 21st 1635. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Walter James. This was dated 1187, in the Pipe Rolls of the county of Gloucestershire, during the reign of King Henry 11nd, 1154 - 1189.

James is a very common surname in the United States and has been most prevalent in the Southeast, though the name is actually most common in Alaska.

McWhorter

Recorded in several forms including MacWhirter, McWhirter, MacChruiter, McChruiter, McQuarter, McQuirter, and even Mewhirter, this is a surname of medieval Gaelic origins. It is generally considered to be Scottish, but we have some reservations, as the earliest known recordings seem to be from Ireland. What is certain is that if the name is Scottish, Ayrshire on the west coast would seem to be the place of origin, but that in its different forms it is equally popular in the Irish counties of Armagh and Antrim. The derivation is clearly from the ancient Gaelic word "cruiteir" meaning a harper or harpist, a word which appeared equally in early records of both Ireland and Scotland. As such the surname is a metonymic or nickname for a musician. According to some authorities the nameholders belong to the Clan Buchanan, and were hereditary harpists to the chiefs of the clan. This is possible although the Buchanans originate from Stirling, quite some way in earlier times, from Ayr. It is also rather curious that whilst the name is recorded in Northern Ireland as early as 1684, the first recording that we have in Scotland is not until 1749, when Andrew M'Whiter of Kirkhobble, is so recorded. The name appears in the records of the state of New Jersey in 1734, when Alexander McWhorter was born at Newark. He was an active participant in the later War of Independance (1776 - 1781). The name is now much associated with the famous Guiness Book of Records edited by Norris McWhirter.

McWhorter is a moderately common surname in the United States and most prevalent in the Southeast, especially in Georgia.

Pridmore

The Pridmore surname is of Medieval English origin and is locational from a so called 'lost' village, likely to have once been situated in Northamptonshire, which is suggested by the fact that there are numerous recordings of this surname in that county. The derivation is from the Welsh 'Pridd', meaning earth, soil and the Old English pre 7th Century 'mor', upland. The phenomenon of the 'lost' village was a result of enforced land clearance in the 12th and 13th Centuries to make way for sheep pasture, as well as the more natural causes such as plague, and war. These dispossessed people, along with those seeking work farther afield, would often adopt the village name as a means of identification, thus resulting in a wide dispersal of the name. The first recorded spelling of the family name is shown to be that of Erasnus Pridmore, marriage to Elizabeth Mears, which was dated February 2nd 1641, St. Nicholas, Cole Abbey, London, during the reign of King Charles 1, 'The Martyr', 1625-1649.

While Pridmore is an uncommon surname in the United States, it is most prevalent in the Southeast, specifically, Alabama.

Sinclair

The following excerpt was published in the Independent Press-Telegram (Long Beach, California), 08 February 1959, Sunday Edition, Page 64

The SINCLAIRS go back to Woldernus, Count de Saint Clair, of Normandy, France, who entered England with the 11th century Norman conquerors of Britain. His descendant William de St. Clair was granted the baronial estate of Roslin in the Scotch county of Midlothian in A.D. 1150. Other descendants lived in Suffolk, England. The town and estate of Saint Clair, Normandy, were named for Saint Clair, a 3rd century bishop of Nantes. “Clair,” a given name, meant “illustrious one.” The French surname Saint was altered to Sinclair in Scotland and England. Sir William Sinclair died in 1329 fighting the Moors in Spain. He was accompanying Sir James Douglas, to whom was entrusted the heart of the Scotch hero-king Robert Bruce, for burial in the Holy Land. The Sinclair coat-of-arms has a ship at anchor with furled sails, centered on a blue shield.

Search memorial contributions by SweetCarolineage