Gail Slater

Member for
7 years · 4 months · 28 days
Find A Grave ID
47462104

Bio

I have lived in Butler, Pennsylvania all of my life and have been on a journey discovering my family history for over 35 years. I have created many memorials for my own ancestors (Slater, Reith, Stepp, Schehl, Brown, Riding, Hartzell and many more), as my discoveries are made.

I believe that every life deserves to be remembered and I add memorials for others because of this.

I HAVE NO PROBLEM TRANSFERING MEMORIALS TO THE FAMILIES IN WHICH THEY BELONG! PLEASE ASK!

Dear Ancestor:
Your tombstone stands among the rest neglected and alone, the name and date are chiseled out on polished marble stone.
It reaches out to all who care, it is too late to mourn, you did not know that I exist, you died and I was born.
Yet each of us are cells of you, in flesh, in blood and bone, our blood contracts and beats a pulse entirely not our own.
Dear Ancestor, the place you filled one hundred years ago, spreads out among the ones you left
who would have loved you so.
I wonder if you lived and loved,I wonder if you knew, that someday I would find this spot and come to visit you
----Author Unknown


COINS LEFT ON TOMBSTONES

While visiting some cemeteries you may notice that headstones marking certain graves have coins on them, left by previous visitors to the grave.

These coins have distinct meanings when left on the headstones of those who gave their life while serving in America's military, and these meanings vary depending on the denomination of coin.

A coin left on a headstone or at the grave site is meant as a message to the deceased soldier's family that someone else has visited the grave to pay respect. Leaving a penny at the grave means simply that you visited.

A nickel indicates that you and the deceased trained at boot camp together, while a dime means you served with him in some capacity. By leaving a quarter at the grave, you are telling the family that you were with the solider when he was killed.

According to tradition, the money left at graves in national cemeteries and state veterans cemeteries is eventually collected, and the funds are put toward maintaining the cemetery or paying burial costs for indigent veterans.

Search memorial contributions by Gail Slater

Contributions

Advertisement

Brown roots

86 Memorials

Foster roots

45 Memorials

Hartzel/Hartzell Roots

278 Memorials