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Sir Richard de Burgh

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Sir Richard de Burgh

Birth
Northern Ireland
Death 29 Jul 1326 (aged 66–67)
Cashel, County Tipperary, Ireland
Burial Golden, County Tipperary, Ireland
Memorial ID 85679488 View Source
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Knight, Earl of Ulster. Nicknamed the Red Earl and the general of all the Irish forces in Ireland, Scotland, Wales and Gascoigne.

Son of Sir Walter de Burgh and Aveline FitzJohn, grandson of Sir John FitzGeoffrey and Isabel de Bigod, Sir Richard de Burgh and Margaret de Lacy.

Richard married Margaret, the possible daughter of Arnoul II, Count of Guines and Alice de Coucy. They were married before 27 Feb 1281 and had fours sons and six daughters:
* Walter de Burgh
* John de Burgh, married Elizbeth de Clare
* Thomas de Burgh
* Sir Edmund de Burgh
* Eleanor, wife of Thomas de Multon, Lord Multon of Egremont
* Elizabeth, wife of Robert de Brus, King of Scotland
* Maud, wife of Gilbert de Clare
Aveline, wife of John Bermingham, Earl of Louth
* Katherine, wife of Maurice FitzThomas
* Joan, wife of Thomas FitzGerald, Earl of Kildare & Sir John Darcy, Baron de Knayth

Richard was the most powerful of the Burghs, succeeding his father in 1280, and constantly tangling with the Irish, particularly in Connaught, his own Lord. Queen Eleanor granted him her manor of Roteneche in Ireland in 1283. Richard invaded Connaught in 1286, plundering the monasteries and churches, taking hostages and then attacked King of Connaught, Magnus O'Connor at the castle of Milic.

Despite his daughter married the King of Scotland, Richard joined King Edward's fight against the Scots. A feud with Sir John FitzThomas, who held Richard hostage in his own castle Dec 1294 to Mar 1295 led to Sir John's forfeit of 120 librates (land having the annual value of one pound.) He was appointed Lieutenant of Ireland in 1308, but the position was immediately canceled and give to Peter de Gaveston, the favorite of Edward II. Invasions into Ireland by Edward Bruce and Felim Conhuir lost Richard his authority until he recovered Ulster after the defeat at Faughart and ultimately, Conhuir's death.

Sir Richard built churches, granted lands to religious groups, was a benefactor of the Cistercian house of St Mary at Dunbrody and built three castles; Ballimore, Greencastle and Sligo, and founded the Carmelite monastery at Loughrea, Tipperary, Ireland. Richard retired to the Athassel Priory, Cashel, Tipperary, Ireland, where he died and was buried.


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