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 Josephine <I>Bristol</I> Aldrich

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Josephine Bristol Aldrich

Birth
Litchfield County, Connecticut, USA
Death
12 Aug 1917 (aged 74)
Birmingham, Jefferson County, Alabama, USA
Burial
Washington, District of Columbia, District of Columbia, USA
Plot
Section: L
Memorial ID
28198534 View Source

Josephine Bristol married James H Cables on 15 November 1867 in Connecticut. They had at least one daughter, Cherrie. Cherrie was married to George Garland and in the 1880 census they gave their occupation as actors. They had a daughter, Lillian, born in 1876. Biographies for Josephine do not mention this marriage but state that she and her then husband, William Farrington Aldrich, had an adopted daughter and son. It is my belief that Lillian, the adopted daughter born in June 1876, is the same daughter of Cherrie and George Garland.

Mrs. Josephine W Cables was well know for her newspaper "The Occult World" showing that she was indeed at one time married to Mr. Cables. James H Cables was arrested in 1889 for trying to pass counterfeit bills. He stated in his arraignment that he as very recently separated from his wife and that he lived in Rochester, New York.

Josephine became a philanthropist and author who wrote "The Occult World"; secretary of the Theosophical society of the United States, president of the Rochester brotherhood; vice-president in the Woman's national industrial league, and the Woman's national liberal union; active in founding the Woman's national university, and the School of useful and ornamental arts; wife of US Representative William F. Aldrich.

From Woman of the Century/Josephine Cables Aldrich: ALDRICH, Mrs. Josephine Cables, author and philanthropist born in Connecticut. She was but a few years old when her mother died, leaving her in the care of two Puritan grandmothers of the most severe school, strict in the observance of what they considered their religious duties. They believed that a free use of the rod was necessary to save the child's soul from destruction. This severe treatment taught her that the Golden Rule was by far the best maxim for morality and happiness, and no sooner was she in control of a home of her own in Rochester, N. Y., than she gave such instruction for the betterment of humanity by word and deed that her home became a sort of Mecca for advance thinkers, not only of America, but pilgrims came from Europe, Asia and Africa to confer with her. In 1882 she began in Rochester, N. Y., the publication of "The Occult World," a little paper devoted to advanced thought and reform work. Her editorials taught liberality, justice and mercy. Her greatest work has been in private life, and her influence for good over the individual was remarkable. She was at one time secretary of the Theosophical Society of the United States, and president of the Rochester Brotherhood. She is now in affluent circumstances in a home in Aldrich, Ala., a mining town named for her husband. Mr. Aldrich fully sustains his wife in all her work, and she is in turn assisting him to carry out a plan of his, whereby persons accused of crime shall be defended before the court, at the public expense, as diligently and ably as such persons are now prosecuted. The town of Aldrich is a quiet, peaceful, moral and refined community, where the rights of all are respected, and where drink and tobacco are almost unknown. Mrs. Aldrich is vice-president of the Woman's National Industrial League, vice-president of the Woman's National Liberal Union, and one of the founders of the Woman's National University and School of Useful and Ornamental Arts.

Josephine Bristol married James H Cables on 15 November 1867 in Connecticut. They had at least one daughter, Cherrie. Cherrie was married to George Garland and in the 1880 census they gave their occupation as actors. They had a daughter, Lillian, born in 1876. Biographies for Josephine do not mention this marriage but state that she and her then husband, William Farrington Aldrich, had an adopted daughter and son. It is my belief that Lillian, the adopted daughter born in June 1876, is the same daughter of Cherrie and George Garland.

Mrs. Josephine W Cables was well know for her newspaper "The Occult World" showing that she was indeed at one time married to Mr. Cables. James H Cables was arrested in 1889 for trying to pass counterfeit bills. He stated in his arraignment that he as very recently separated from his wife and that he lived in Rochester, New York.

Josephine became a philanthropist and author who wrote "The Occult World"; secretary of the Theosophical society of the United States, president of the Rochester brotherhood; vice-president in the Woman's national industrial league, and the Woman's national liberal union; active in founding the Woman's national university, and the School of useful and ornamental arts; wife of US Representative William F. Aldrich.

From Woman of the Century/Josephine Cables Aldrich: ALDRICH, Mrs. Josephine Cables, author and philanthropist born in Connecticut. She was but a few years old when her mother died, leaving her in the care of two Puritan grandmothers of the most severe school, strict in the observance of what they considered their religious duties. They believed that a free use of the rod was necessary to save the child's soul from destruction. This severe treatment taught her that the Golden Rule was by far the best maxim for morality and happiness, and no sooner was she in control of a home of her own in Rochester, N. Y., than she gave such instruction for the betterment of humanity by word and deed that her home became a sort of Mecca for advance thinkers, not only of America, but pilgrims came from Europe, Asia and Africa to confer with her. In 1882 she began in Rochester, N. Y., the publication of "The Occult World," a little paper devoted to advanced thought and reform work. Her editorials taught liberality, justice and mercy. Her greatest work has been in private life, and her influence for good over the individual was remarkable. She was at one time secretary of the Theosophical Society of the United States, and president of the Rochester Brotherhood. She is now in affluent circumstances in a home in Aldrich, Ala., a mining town named for her husband. Mr. Aldrich fully sustains his wife in all her work, and she is in turn assisting him to carry out a plan of his, whereby persons accused of crime shall be defended before the court, at the public expense, as diligently and ably as such persons are now prosecuted. The town of Aldrich is a quiet, peaceful, moral and refined community, where the rights of all are respected, and where drink and tobacco are almost unknown. Mrs. Aldrich is vice-president of the Woman's National Industrial League, vice-president of the Woman's National Liberal Union, and one of the founders of the Woman's National University and School of Useful and Ornamental Arts.


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  • Created by: Carolyn Golowka
  • Added: 11 Jul 2008
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 28198534
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/28198534/josephine-aldrich: accessed ), memorial page for Josephine Bristol Aldrich (12 Jun 1843–12 Aug 1917), Find a Grave Memorial ID 28198534, citing Rock Creek Cemetery, Washington, District of Columbia, District of Columbia, USA; Maintained by Carolyn Golowka (contributor 46935641) .