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Thomas A. Baker
[Add Flowers]
Flowers 1 to 50 (of 185 total)51 - 100 

- Lazer
 Added: Jul. 22, 2014
 

- sjm
 Added: Jul. 7, 2014
 

- James Snow
 Added: Jul. 7, 2014
 

- wings214
 Added: Jun. 25, 2014
 

- R I P
 Added: Jun. 25, 2014
 
Thank you from the bottom of my heart!
- Mary Ellen Baker
 Added: Jun. 25, 2014
 

- sjm
 Added: Jun. 25, 2014
 

- Yvonne L.Hღ
 Added: Jun. 24, 2014
 
Your bravery and heroism gave our country its strength. You are not forgotten
- GA Baker
 Added: Jun. 6, 2014
 
"Nor shall your Glory be forgot while Fame her record keeps,for Honor points the hallowed spot where Valor proudly sleeps."
- 13th Generation Fairbanks in America
 Added: May. 27, 2014
 
Remembering you and your family today. Thank you for your service and your sacrifice. May you rest in peace.
- A Marine's Daughter & Army Mom
 Added: Apr. 25, 2014
 
Valor
- J Spencer
 Added: Feb. 4, 2014
 

- Lazer
 Added: Jan. 2, 2014
 
Sgt U.S. Army World War II.
- Judy Richards
 Added: Aug. 25, 2013
 
The Medal of Honor is the highest military decoration awarded by the United States government. It is bestowed by the President in the name of Congress on members of the United States Armed Forces who distinguish themselves through "conspicuous gallantry and intrepidity at the risk of his or her life above and beyond the call of duty while engaged in an action against an enemy of the United States." Due to the nature of its criteria, it is often awarded posthumously (more than half have been since 1941). Members of all branches of the armed forces are eligible to receive the medal, and there are three versions (one for the Army, one for the Air Force, and one for the Navy, Marine Corps and Coast Guard). The Medal of Honor is bestowed upon an individual by the passing of a Joint Resolution in the Congress; and is then personally presented to the recipient or, in the case of posthumous awards, to next of kin, by the President of the United States, on behalf of the Congress, representing and recognizing the gratitude of the American people as a whole. Due to its honored status, the medal is afforded special protection under U.S. law. The Medal of Honor is one of two military neck order awards issued by the United States and is the sole neck order awarded to members of the armed forces (the Commander's Degree of the Legion of Merit is also a neck order but it is only authorized for issue to foreign dignitaries). As the award citation includes the phrase "in the name of Congress", it is sometimes erroneously called the Congressional Medal of Honor; however, the official title is simply the Medal of Honor.
- Judy Richards
 Added: Aug. 25, 2013
 
Purple Heart Awarded for wounds or death as result of an act of any opposing armed force, as a result of an international terrorist attack or as a result of military operations while serving as part of a peacekeeping force. The oldest of our military awards, the predecessor for the Purple heart was George Washington's "Badge of Military Merit" (1782).  Washington's award was resurrected in 1932 as the Purple Heart and is awarded to any person wounded in action while serving in any of our Armed Forces.  It is also presented posthumously to the next of kin of personnel killed in action or who die of wounds sustained in action.
- Judy Richards
 Added: Aug. 25, 2013
 
The World War II Victory Medal is a decoration of the United States military which was created by an act of Congress in July 1945. The decoration commemorates military service during World War II and is awarded to any member of the United States military, including members of the armed forces of the Government of the Philippine Islands, who served on active duty, or as a reservist, between December 7, 1941 and December 31, 1946. The World War II Victory Medal was first issued as a ribbon, and was referred to simply as the "Victory Ribbon." By 1946, a full medal had been established which was referred to as the World War II Victory Medal. The medal's front depicts Nike standing victorious, holding a broken sword, representing the broken power of the Axis, with one foot upon the helmet of Mars, the Roman god of war, representing the end of the conflict. Behind Nike is a sunburst, representing the dawn of peace. The reverse recalls the "Four Freedoms" speech by President Roosevelt, with a laurel sprig, surrounded by the words "United States of America", and the dates of the conflict, "1941-1945". The edges of the ribbon revisit the multi-colored rainbow ribbon of the Allied World War I Victory Medal. This again honors all the allied nations. The wide red center represents the new sacrifice of blood by World War II combatants. The thin white lines separating the central red band from the outer multi-colored bands represent the rays of new hope, two of them signifying that this was the second global conflict. There is no minimum service time limit for the issuance of the World War II Victory Medal, and the National Personnel Records Center has reported some cases of service members receiving the award for simply a few days of service. As the Second World War ended on September 2, 1945, there are also cases of service members, who had enlisted in 1946, receiving the decoration without having been a veteran of World War II. The reason for this late date is that President Harry S. Truman did not declare an official end of hostilities until the last day of 1946.
- Judy Richards
 Added: Aug. 25, 2013
 
The American Campaign Medal was a military decoration of the United States armed forces which was first created on November 6, 1942 by issued by President Franklin D. Roosevelt. Originally issued as the "American Theater Ribbon", the decoration was intended to recognize those service members who had performed duty in the American Theater of Operations during World War II. To be awarded the American Campaign Medal, a service member was required to either perform one year of duty (cumulative) within the continental borders of the United States, or perform 30 days consecutive/60 non-consecutive days of duty outside the borders of the United States but within the American Theater of Operations. The American Theater was defined as the entirety of the United States to include most of the Atlantic Ocean, a portion of Alaska, and a small portion of the Pacific bordering California and Baja California. The eligibility dates of the American Campaign Medal were from December 7, 1941 to March 2, 1946. Service stars were authorized to any service member who was engaged in actual combat with Axis forces within the American theater. This primarily applied to those members of the military which had engaged in anti-U-Boat patrols in the Atlantic.
- Judy Richards
 Added: Aug. 25, 2013
 
Salute!
- occupy378
 Added: Jul. 7, 2013
 

- Sgt. Rock
 Added: Jul. 7, 2013
 
God bless you today and always. Rest in Peace.
- Thelma
 Added: Jun. 25, 2013
 

- Cougar
 Added: Jun. 25, 2013
 
Remembering You on Memorial Day 2013
- Lazer
 Added: May. 27, 2013
 
With great respect for your courage.
- Captain Jack
 Added: May. 20, 2013
 
Thank you for your service, gallantry and sacrifice. R.I.P.
- Dr. Don
 Added: Jul. 7, 2012
 
WWII - You served our country faithfully. May we always cherish our freedom by honoring your memory. God bless you!
- Darlene T.
 Added: Jun. 28, 2012
 
Rest in peace, Sergeant. Thank you for your service and sacrifice. May we always honor the high price you paid for our freedom. You aren't forgotten, for true valor such as yours lives on in the hearts of those whom you touched. God bless you!
- Sharon
 Added: Jun. 25, 2012
 
Thank you brave American
- occupy378
 Added: Jun. 25, 2012
 
God bless you on your birthday. Rest in Peace.
- Thelma
 Added: Jun. 25, 2012
 

- Martin W
 Added: May. 28, 2012
 

- Bob & Nancy Cannon
 Added: Oct. 21, 2011
 
Rest in Peace, beloved soldier. See you in Heaven.
- Mary
 Added: Aug. 2, 2011
 
Thank you for your most valued service to our country. Rest in peace.
- Robert Saulino, Sr.
 Added: Jul. 7, 2011
 
Thank you for your most valued service to our country. Rest in peace.
- Robert Saulino, Sr.
 Added: Jul. 7, 2011
 

 Added: Jun. 25, 2011
 
Birthday Blessings
- Thelma
 Added: Jun. 25, 2011
 

- Russ Pickett
 Added: May. 31, 2011
 
Thank you for your great sacrifice in trying to save others and in preserving our country's freedoms. I will honor you in the only way that I can . . . by remembering you always. May you rest in peace.
- Charles A. Lewis
 Added: Feb. 26, 2011
 
Thank you for your service to our country. Rest in peace.
- Robert Saulino, Sr.
 Added: Oct. 16, 2010
 

- Stacey
 Added: Sep. 23, 2010
 

- Ethel Duggar
 Added: Jul. 7, 2010
 
Birthday Blessings
- Thelma
 Added: Jun. 25, 2010
 
HERO!!
- LaDene
 Added: Jun. 25, 2010
 

- Seagull
 Added: Jun. 16, 2010
 
thank u for your service to our country
- Anita Salek
 Added: May. 29, 2010
 
Thank you for your service to our country, because of you, and men like you, we in the United States of America today enjoy FREEDOM !!Rest in peace.
- R. Saulino, Sr.
 Added: Apr. 25, 2010
 
Thank you for your service
- Sue Fitzpatrick
 Added: Nov. 22, 2009
 
May You Rest in Peace...
- GetYourLeash
 Added: Sep. 5, 2009
 
Thanks.
- O'KC
 Added: Aug. 3, 2009
 

- Ron Moody
 Added: Apr. 17, 2009
 
Flowers 1 to 50 (of 185 total)51 - 100 
 

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