Scott Day Freeman

Member for
9 years 11 months 28 days
Find a Grave ID
48047198

Bio

Having devoted a significant portion of her life to genealogical research and historic preservation, my mother passed on a wealth family history information to our family, some of wish I hope to share by creating or augmenting Find A Grave ("FG") memorials.

As a reminder, although FG "does not discourage" "legitimate indexing" of deceased individuals through obituaries, it asks that any indexing or memorializing through newspapers or other third-party sources be done with "full respect of copyright." "Full respect of copyright" law means having the copyright owner's permission before reproducing another's original work.

The author of an obituary that constitutes an original, creative work, i.e., something more than a listing of basic biographic facts like birth and death dates, has a copyright in that work. The copyright owner may transfer the copyright, grant a license for another to use the work for a specific purpose (a form of limited-purpose transfer), or waive the copyright. Just because an obituary has been published in print or on-line and accessible to "the public" does not mean the copyright has been waived. Nor does it mean that the work has been transformed into some sort of "public domain" document that can be freely reproduced without the permission of the copyright holder.

In addition, FG asks those who memorialize to "refrain from adding information about living people." Obituaries often contain personal information about living individuals. Accordingly, even if the owner of the copyright grants permission for an obituary to be republished on FG, to comply with FG standards, the obituary should be edited to refrain from adding information about living people.

Although FG is a great resource for genealogical data, biographies for the individuals memorialized should be in narrative form, not a mere listing of facts. Setting forth these facts in a narrative will better honor the individual and perhaps help others understand the sources, uncertainties, incompleteness, or other limitations of the data.

Finally, please let me know if photographs of tombstones or markers that I have taken do not appear properly orientated. The photographs appeared properly orientated when uploaded.

Having devoted a significant portion of her life to genealogical research and historic preservation, my mother passed on a wealth family history information to our family, some of wish I hope to share by creating or augmenting Find A Grave ("FG") memorials.

As a reminder, although FG "does not discourage" "legitimate indexing" of deceased individuals through obituaries, it asks that any indexing or memorializing through newspapers or other third-party sources be done with "full respect of copyright." "Full respect of copyright" law means having the copyright owner's permission before reproducing another's original work.

The author of an obituary that constitutes an original, creative work, i.e., something more than a listing of basic biographic facts like birth and death dates, has a copyright in that work. The copyright owner may transfer the copyright, grant a license for another to use the work for a specific purpose (a form of limited-purpose transfer), or waive the copyright. Just because an obituary has been published in print or on-line and accessible to "the public" does not mean the copyright has been waived. Nor does it mean that the work has been transformed into some sort of "public domain" document that can be freely reproduced without the permission of the copyright holder.

In addition, FG asks those who memorialize to "refrain from adding information about living people." Obituaries often contain personal information about living individuals. Accordingly, even if the owner of the copyright grants permission for an obituary to be republished on FG, to comply with FG standards, the obituary should be edited to refrain from adding information about living people.

Although FG is a great resource for genealogical data, biographies for the individuals memorialized should be in narrative form, not a mere listing of facts. Setting forth these facts in a narrative will better honor the individual and perhaps help others understand the sources, uncertainties, incompleteness, or other limitations of the data.

Finally, please let me know if photographs of tombstones or markers that I have taken do not appear properly orientated. The photographs appeared properly orientated when uploaded.

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