Marlene S.

Member for
6 years · 5 months ·
Find A Grave ID
47704048

Bio

I live in south central Wisconsin. I've always loved history. My great uncle traced our Raithel family lineage back to the 1400's in Germany, some of which I have posted at geneology.com. It would just follow that I would end up here at Find A Grave! I make vacations out of photographing graves so I apologize for invading anyone's territory. It's the only thing I make time to get away for.
I prefer to allow family members control if they wish it.
I strive for quality over quantity, I wish everyone did. NOTE TO VOLUNTEERS: PLEASE take photos of the entire stone and not just the engraving! Some people are visiting loved ones on Find A Grave!
I really dislike the fact that we can't edit the memorials that power listers make with no dates or links.
Any of my photos may be used for whatever purpose you wish, I am in no way a stickler for copyrights so feel free to use them and there is no need to credit me for any edits. :)

On my mother's side, my lineage includes Raithel, Bienfang, Weiss, Ruckdeschel, Hockett, Stephens, and Repper (Ripper).
The present Raithel name can be traced into the 1400s. In 1987, Max Raithel, a descendant of many generations who lived at Schwingen, Stobersreuth, West Germany, told my great uncle George Raithel when he visited there that our ancestors received a plaque from Sigismund, Holy Roman Emperor, King of Behemia and Hungary, who sought to end the great schism which split the Roman Catholic Church.
According to German archives, the Raithel name developed gradually through the middle ages. It is found as Raitell in 1567, Reitel in 1610, Reitl and Radell in 1618, Raidell in 1631, Rathel in 1639, Reytel in 1642, and Raithel in 1714. These names are picked from Church records showing the contributions or taxes of the Raithels and their "subjects" in florenes, guilders and thalers.
The marital records show Raithels (bride or groom) married into families named Greim, Ritter, Fischer, Trampler, Rauber, Neupert, Seiler, Kiessling, Bugrucker and Sack, from 1580 to 1783.
In 1854 our ancestors left their farm near Selb in the Stobersreuth area, journeying to Hof where they stayed overnight, and onward to Bremen where they boarded the sailing ship Hermine, leaving July 12, 1854. After 56 days on board they arrived in New York Port, from whence they proceeded to a relative in Jefferson WI. Another son, Johann Wolfgang had come to the U.S. earlier. He was reported murdered in Hebron WI and robbed of his pay as a wagon maker which he planned to deposit in the bank in Helenville WI. Such history!

Search memorial contributions by Marlene S.

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