Sharon Lee “Little Miss Nobody” Gallegos

Sharon Lee “Little Miss Nobody” Gallegos

Birth
Alamogordo, Otero County, New Mexico, USA
Death
21 Jul 1960 (aged 4)
Congress, Yavapai County, Arizona, USA
Burial
Prescott, Yavapai County, Arizona, USA
Memorial ID
99600514 View Source

October, 2012: I have no idea who this is, but, when I saw the tombstone I felt the need to add a memorial page for her... Pat Raether

Added June 10, 2014:
On July 31, 1960 in Prescott Arizona, the body of a child was found, half buried in West Central Arizona Near Congress. The body was believed to be that of a child between the ages of six and eight. At the time she would come to be known as "little miss nobody".
The day she was buried she was no longer known as that, then she would come to be known as "Gods Little Child". The people of Prescott buried her in a casket with and inscription:

God's little child
date of birth unknown
date of death unknown

Efforts were made by the FBI as well as state and country officers to find out who the little girl was and to find out how this child had died. Their efforts did not pay off. As of January 2009, the child has never been identified nor has anyone come forward to give information leading to how she died or to claim a relation to her, of any kind.

March 16, 2022:
'Little Miss Nobody' identified over 60 years later with DNA
PRESCOTT, Ariz. (AP) — "Little Miss Nobody" finally has a name.

The Yavapai County Sheriff's office said Tuesday the previously unidentified little girl whose burned remains were found over 60 years ago in the Arizona desert was 4-year-old Sharon Lee Gallegos, of New Mexico.

The child's remains were found on July 31, 1960, partially buried in a wash in Congress, Arizona. Her age at various times over the years was estimated to be between 6 and 8 years old, then later at between 3 and 6 years old.

Residents in the nearby central-north Arizona community of Prescott raised money for a funeral and florists and a mortuary donated their services for the little girl they had dubbed "Little Miss Nobody."

News reports at the time said a local radio announcer and his wife stood in for the girl's parents during the funeral at Prescott's Congregational Church.

"I guess I just couldn't stand to see a little child buried in boot hill," KYCA announcer Dave Paladin was quoted as saying in an Aug. 11, 1960 article by The Associated Press.

Sharon Lee Gallegos was reportedly abducted from behind her home in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on July 21, 1960, a little over a week before her body was found. Authorities say they do not know who took and killed the child.

The remains were exhumed to get DNA samples and the National Center for Exploited and Missing Children, the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System and others worked on the case.

The sheriff's office and Texas DNA company Othram raised $4,000 earlier this year to pay for specialized testing that finally identified the girl.

Ray Chavez, the child's nephew, thanked authorities at the news conference for not giving up their quest to identify his aunt. He said she had been described to him as a happy-go-lucky girl.

"We were amazed how the people rallied around her," Chavez said. "Thank you for keeping my aunt safe and never forgetting her."
Contributor: JIM BOYLAN (49668495)Little Miss Nobody is the name posthumously given to an unidentified child murder victim whose body was found in Congress, Yavapai County, Arizona on July 31, 1960. The girl's body is estimated to have been discovered within one to two weeks of the date of her murder. Estimates of her age at death have ranged from 2 to 9 years old. Due to the advanced state of decomposition of the child's remains, the specific cause of death has never been established, although her death has always been considered to be a homicide.

This unidentified decedent became known as "Little Miss Nobody" after no family or friends came forward to either report her missing or to claim her body. Following recent advances in technology, a forensic facial reconstruction of the child was released to the media in 2018 in renewed efforts to identify her remains.

On March 14, 2022, it was announced that Little Miss Nobody has been identified, nearly 62 years after her remains were found.

October, 2012: I have no idea who this is, but, when I saw the tombstone I felt the need to add a memorial page for her... Pat Raether

Added June 10, 2014:
On July 31, 1960 in Prescott Arizona, the body of a child was found, half buried in West Central Arizona Near Congress. The body was believed to be that of a child between the ages of six and eight. At the time she would come to be known as "little miss nobody".
The day she was buried she was no longer known as that, then she would come to be known as "Gods Little Child". The people of Prescott buried her in a casket with and inscription:

God's little child
date of birth unknown
date of death unknown

Efforts were made by the FBI as well as state and country officers to find out who the little girl was and to find out how this child had died. Their efforts did not pay off. As of January 2009, the child has never been identified nor has anyone come forward to give information leading to how she died or to claim a relation to her, of any kind.

March 16, 2022:
'Little Miss Nobody' identified over 60 years later with DNA
PRESCOTT, Ariz. (AP) — "Little Miss Nobody" finally has a name.

The Yavapai County Sheriff's office said Tuesday the previously unidentified little girl whose burned remains were found over 60 years ago in the Arizona desert was 4-year-old Sharon Lee Gallegos, of New Mexico.

The child's remains were found on July 31, 1960, partially buried in a wash in Congress, Arizona. Her age at various times over the years was estimated to be between 6 and 8 years old, then later at between 3 and 6 years old.

Residents in the nearby central-north Arizona community of Prescott raised money for a funeral and florists and a mortuary donated their services for the little girl they had dubbed "Little Miss Nobody."

News reports at the time said a local radio announcer and his wife stood in for the girl's parents during the funeral at Prescott's Congregational Church.

"I guess I just couldn't stand to see a little child buried in boot hill," KYCA announcer Dave Paladin was quoted as saying in an Aug. 11, 1960 article by The Associated Press.

Sharon Lee Gallegos was reportedly abducted from behind her home in Alamogordo, New Mexico, on July 21, 1960, a little over a week before her body was found. Authorities say they do not know who took and killed the child.

The remains were exhumed to get DNA samples and the National Center for Exploited and Missing Children, the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System and others worked on the case.

The sheriff's office and Texas DNA company Othram raised $4,000 earlier this year to pay for specialized testing that finally identified the girl.

Ray Chavez, the child's nephew, thanked authorities at the news conference for not giving up their quest to identify his aunt. He said she had been described to him as a happy-go-lucky girl.

"We were amazed how the people rallied around her," Chavez said. "Thank you for keeping my aunt safe and never forgetting her."
Contributor: JIM BOYLAN (49668495)Little Miss Nobody is the name posthumously given to an unidentified child murder victim whose body was found in Congress, Yavapai County, Arizona on July 31, 1960. The girl's body is estimated to have been discovered within one to two weeks of the date of her murder. Estimates of her age at death have ranged from 2 to 9 years old. Due to the advanced state of decomposition of the child's remains, the specific cause of death has never been established, although her death has always been considered to be a homicide.

This unidentified decedent became known as "Little Miss Nobody" after no family or friends came forward to either report her missing or to claim her body. Following recent advances in technology, a forensic facial reconstruction of the child was released to the media in 2018 in renewed efforts to identify her remains.

On March 14, 2022, it was announced that Little Miss Nobody has been identified, nearly 62 years after her remains were found.


Inscription

"Blessed are the pure in heart." Matthew 5:8

Gravesite Details

Additional information kindly given by FAG member Angel on June 10, 2014


Family Members

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