Capt Edward Worthington

Capt Edward Worthington

Birth
Macroom, County Cork, Ireland
Death 3 Sep 1804 (aged 51–52)
New Orleans, Orleans Parish, Louisiana, USA
Burial Burial Details Unknown, Specifically: It is thought by some that Edward was buried in a cemetery that now is under the New Orleans Superdome. Many graves were moved when it was built, but Edward's name is not on that list today.
Memorial ID 99264039 · View Source
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CAPTAIN EDWARD WORTHINGTON
 
Captain Edward Worthington was the son of Thomas and Naomy Ann Clarke Worthington. He was born in Macroom, Muskerry West, County Cork, Ireland, between 1750 and 1754. Thomas and Ann along with several other family members left Ireland to come to America sometime around 1768. They lived in Baltimore, MD before moving on to the area of Ohio County, Virginia, now Wheeling, WVA. They were established in Ohio County by 1773.
In 1774 Edward and his father joined the army in Lord Dunmore's War. The Draper papers list Edward Worthington as a "Long Hunter." He had already explored the Kentucky territory several times before traveling down the Ohio River with George Rogers Clark in 1775.
Edward was wounded at McClelland's station in Kentucky in December of 1775. He, and everyone in the station, moved on to Harrodsburg for better protection from the Indians.
Edward Worthington quickly became Captain in George Rogers Clark's Illinois Regiment. He was known as "Clark's Irish Captain." He fought several major battles under Clark, including Vincennes and Kaskaskia. He remained in Clark's company until the end of the war and received an Honorable Discharge in 1783.
In 1781 he received a letter from Thomas Jefferson appointing him to enlist men. He was brought up on court-martial charges for drinking by another Captain. Edward won the case when he explained that the only way he could enlist some of these men was to drink with them.
Captain Edward and his family were on Corn Island, an island in the Ohio River at Louisville. George Rogers Clark built a fort on Corn Island and maintained it during the Revolutionary War with a few families and soldiers. Corn Island was an important strategic position for the Illinois Campaign.
Captain Edward Worthington was one of the loyal men who marched with Clark on Vincennes and Kaskaskia. Both victories were major wins for the Revolutionary War. Edward established Worthington Station about 4.5 miles from Danville in Lincoln County, Kentucky. The site of the station is now in Boyle County.*
Edward was given a land grant in Jefferson County, Kentucky, on the basis that he raised a crop of corn in Kentucky in 1775. His future wife Elizabeth also received a land grant, the first woman in Kentucky to do so in her own right, for raising a crop of corn in Kentucky in 1775. Edward also received several land grants in Lincoln, Mercer, Jefferson, and surrounding counties.
Edward Worthington died in 1804 in Louisiana. He was swindled on a land deal in Kentucky and he and his son followed the culprit to New Orleans where he took him to court. Edward was infected with Yellow Fever and died there before the court tried the case. His heirs won the case, but never received the settlement.
NOTE: The location of the burial site for Capt. Edward Worthington has never been found in New Orleans, but years later descendants created a memorial for him attached to the gravemarker of his son, Charles, in the Worthington Family Cemetery, in Daviess County, Kentucky.


Family Members

Gravesite Details Capt. Worthington's gravesite in New Orleans has never been found. Some speculate that he was buried in a cemetery which is now under the Superdome.

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  • Created by: Carolyn Whaley Vosburg
  • Added: 20 Oct 2012
  • Find a Grave Memorial 99264039
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Capt Edward Worthington (1752–3 Sep 1804), Find a Grave Memorial no. 99264039, ; Maintained by Carolyn Whaley Vosburg (contributor 46810812) Burial Details Unknown, who reports a It is thought by some that Edward was buried in a cemetery that now is under the New Orleans Superdome. Many graves were moved when it was built, but Edward's name is not on that list today..