Lieut Edward Morris

Lieut Edward Morris

Birth
Roxbury, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, USA
Death
12 Aug 1769 (aged 80)
West Woodstock, Windham County, Connecticut, USA
Burial
West Woodstock, Windham County, Connecticut, USA
Memorial ID
9914880 View Source

Husband of Bethiah Peake. They had fifteen children, namely, Elizabeth, Hannah, Edward, Grace, Bithiah, Isaac, Asa, Eunice, Martha, Mary, Jonathan, Priscilla, Hannah, Dorothy and Hannah.

According to the Edward Morris Genealogy, Edward Morris was chosen surveyor of Woodstock in 1718, constable in 1721, and assessor for the years 1738 and 1739. In the latter year he was chosen selectman, and annually thereafter until 1748. He lived with his father until the death of the latter in 1727, and continued to occupy the old homestead until Feb. 22, 1732, when he sold the place to Joseph Wright, for the sum of £1300. The homestead as the spot where his grandfather settled in the beginning of the settlement in 1686, and was originally but thirty acres. It had become one hundred acres through additions made by his grandfather, his father, and himself. Immediately after his purchase Mr. Wright conveyed the property to John Chandler, but continued to occupy it. The mansion house was burned a few years afterward - March 16, 1737, at night - with the furniture and provisions which it contained, and Mrs. Wright, her son, and a Negro servant perished in it.

The same day on which Edward Morris sold the homestead he bought of John Chandler, as executor of Daniel Abbot for £1,100, a mansion house, and forty-nine acres of land adjoining on the east, the property of Joseph Bacon (which was the first lot drawn at the time of settlement). The property purchased lay at a distance of a half mile or more from the main street, on Woodstock Hill, and on the road to West Woodstock. Here he lived until February 1, 1748, when he sold the place with several other parcels of land containing in all about one hundred acres, to Col. Nathan Payson, and removed to West Woodstock and settled about one and a half miles west of the village, between Bungee Brook and Still River, where he had long been in possession of land - some two hundred acres - half of which had once been his fathers. This farm ran back to the line of the town of Union, Still River running through it. West Woodstock had been made a distinct parish in 1743, under the name of New Roxbury. After his removal there he became active in its affairs.

Husband of Bethiah Peake. They had fifteen children, namely, Elizabeth, Hannah, Edward, Grace, Bithiah, Isaac, Asa, Eunice, Martha, Mary, Jonathan, Priscilla, Hannah, Dorothy and Hannah.

According to the Edward Morris Genealogy, Edward Morris was chosen surveyor of Woodstock in 1718, constable in 1721, and assessor for the years 1738 and 1739. In the latter year he was chosen selectman, and annually thereafter until 1748. He lived with his father until the death of the latter in 1727, and continued to occupy the old homestead until Feb. 22, 1732, when he sold the place to Joseph Wright, for the sum of £1300. The homestead as the spot where his grandfather settled in the beginning of the settlement in 1686, and was originally but thirty acres. It had become one hundred acres through additions made by his grandfather, his father, and himself. Immediately after his purchase Mr. Wright conveyed the property to John Chandler, but continued to occupy it. The mansion house was burned a few years afterward - March 16, 1737, at night - with the furniture and provisions which it contained, and Mrs. Wright, her son, and a Negro servant perished in it.

The same day on which Edward Morris sold the homestead he bought of John Chandler, as executor of Daniel Abbot for £1,100, a mansion house, and forty-nine acres of land adjoining on the east, the property of Joseph Bacon (which was the first lot drawn at the time of settlement). The property purchased lay at a distance of a half mile or more from the main street, on Woodstock Hill, and on the road to West Woodstock. Here he lived until February 1, 1748, when he sold the place with several other parcels of land containing in all about one hundred acres, to Col. Nathan Payson, and removed to West Woodstock and settled about one and a half miles west of the village, between Bungee Brook and Still River, where he had long been in possession of land - some two hundred acres - half of which had once been his fathers. This farm ran back to the line of the town of Union, Still River running through it. West Woodstock had been made a distinct parish in 1743, under the name of New Roxbury. After his removal there he became active in its affairs.


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