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 John Bell Griffin

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John Bell Griffin

Birth
Jacksonville, Jackson County, Oregon, USA
Death
30 Apr 1939 (aged 85)
Ashland, Jackson County, Oregon, USA
Burial
Jackson County, Oregon, USA
Memorial ID
9683000 View Source

Son of Burrel Griffin & Sarah Throckmorton, married Bernetta Naylor May 5, 1878
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May 1, 1939
JOHN B. GRIFFIN COLORFUL PIONEER CALLED TO REST
Heart Attack Strikes 'Uncle John' in 86th Year---Born in Jacksonville When City Was Metropolis.
John B. Griffin, famed and colorful pioneer character of southern Oregon, died Sunday morning in the home of his niece, Mrs. Emma Davis, 107 Seventh steet, Ashland. He was in his 86th year.
While not enjoying the best of health in recent months, Mr. Griffin had been about as usual. He was stricken after dinner Saturday evening with a heart attack from which he did not rally.
Mr. Griffin, known familiarly as "Uncle John," was noted for his story-telling proclivities. He wove intriguing yarns about his big game hunting in southern Oregon forests, featuring particularly his experiences with bears. Many of his hunting stories were published in Oregon newspapers.
Loved To Hunt
He was an enthusiastic woodsman and loved the life of a frontiersman, deriving much enjoyment from hunting and fishing. For many years the name of John Griffin was synonomous with big game hunting in southern Oregon and the wildest regions were familiar grounds to him and his bear dogs, which also were famous throughout this part of the state.
Mr. Griffin was born in Jacksonville on September 14, 1853, when the city was the thriving metropolis of southern Oregon and an exciting center of gold mining. He was one of the oldest native sons of Jackson county and one of the first white children born in this part of the state.
Retired for many years, Uncle John spent his last years in telling and writing his experiences and in cultivating friendhips. Stern but yet gentle, he made friends easily and many men and women, old and young, today mourned his death.
On May 5, 1878, Mr. Griffin was married to Miss Nettie Naylor, daughter of Granville Naylor, a pioneer whose land claim was situated on Griffin creek near Jacksonville. Mrs. Griffin died a number of years ago.
Three Survive
Three children survive. Mrs. Abbie Bailey of Merrill, Lawrence Griffin of Bly and Evertt Griffin of Trinidad, Cal. Survivors also include five great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held in the Conger chapel at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, the Rev. D. E. Millard officiating. Interment will be made in the Griffin creek cemetery.
In a recent article in the Oregon Journal Mr. Griffin told of his life in the following words:
"My father, Burrell B. Griffin, was born in Kentucky, May 13, 1808. My mother was born in one of the Carolinas, July 22, 1808. They were married in Missouri, March 22, 1829. All of their 13 children have lived to a good old age except Amos Campbell, who was born and died in 1836.
"My parents, with their children, crossed the plains in 1848 by ox team. Father and mother took a donation claim half a mile from Scio. In the spring of 1849 father and my oldest brother went to California. They got a good claim and took out a good amount of gold. Father believed he could return any time and get another claim, so he sold his claim and he and my brother came back to Linn county. As they passed the Rogue River valley father was struck with admiration of the timber, the numerous streams and the grass, belly-high to his horse. Father and the family moved to the Rogue River valley in the spring of 1852 and took a donation claim four miles southesat of Jacksonville, on a creek named for him and still known as Griffin creek.
"Father bought a band of cattle and some fine horses, built a house and barn and began improving his claim. Not long after the Indians went on the warpath and killed nine of father's horses. He sent a runner to Jacksonville, and some men came and escorted the family to Jacksonville, where they stayed till the trouble was over.
"Father was lieutenant in Captain Miller's company. They had a fight with Old John and his band, August 12, on Applegate creek, near the mouth of Williams creek. Father, with 20 men, went to Sterling creek and destroyed the Indian village there. Next day they went to Williams creek, where they were ambushed and father was wounded with a bullet through his right leg. Francis Garnet was killed. They killed or wounded five Indians. The two oldest of my brothers joined the volunteers and fought with father. Father was wounded twice---once with a bullet in the leg and once in the shoulder with an arrow.
"I was born September 14, 1853, at Jacksonville. I lived on our ranch on Griffin creek 'till I was 25. In 1878 I married Nettie Naylor, whose father, Granville Naylor, built the first sawmill in Jackson county. My wife and I celebrated our 57th wedding anniversary. She died March 14, 1936.
"We took a homestead in the Dead Indian country in 1886. We ran a dairy there seven years. My wife attended to the buttermaking while I did the hunting. We sold butter and venison to the people of Ashland. In those days there were lots of deer, elks, bears, wildcats and cougars in that country. I had a dog that treed over 100 bears in the Cascade range. When he died I had a notice of his death printed in the paper.
"Our children attended school at Phoenix. Later we moved to Grants Pass, where the children continued their schooling. We bought a ranch in Illinois valley, near Sucker creek, and lived there for many years. I traded this ranch for property in Medford, where we lived 'till the death of my wife. I then moved to Ashland."
-------------------------------------------------
The Ashland Tidings, date unknown:
EXCITING LIFE OF VETERAN IS ENDED SUNDAY
Born at Jacksonville, 1853, While Parents Were "Forted" Up Fighting Indians; Third White Child In Co.
John B. Griffin, colorful figure in Ashland or Jackson county, a native son, born in Jacksonville while his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Burrel B. Giffin were forted up on account of Indians being on the war path, passed away at the home of his niece, Mrs. Emma Davis, 107 Seventh Street, Sunday morning at 8:30 o'clock. A heart attack was suffered Saturday evening, from which he did not regain consciousness.
Funeral services will be at the Conger Funeral chapel in Medford Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, the Rev. D. E. Millard minister in charge.
Mr. Griffin was born September 14, 1853, in Jacksonville, the youngest of 11 children. On the fifth day of May, 1878, he was married to Nettie Naylor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Granville Naylor, also Jackson county pioneers of '53.
Three children survive, two sons, Evart D. and Lawrence L., of Bly, Oregon, and Abbie Aula (Mrs. W. C. Bailey) of Klamath Falls. Mrs. Griffin passed away several years ago.
John Bell Griffin, the third white child born in Jackson county grew up amid the primitive environment of a new land, obtaining what schooling he could, and by force of circumstances compelled at an early age to assist in providing a living for himself and for the family. His father and older brothers served in the Indian wars and he early learned to use a gun. By the time he reached his teens he was an excellent shot, and was hunting the bear and deer of the country.
His hunting stories are sagas of this section and he has an unpublished manuscript of the hunting of bear and big game in the pioneer days of southern Oregon.
Known throughout the state as the "bear hunter," he and his dog Trailer have figured in stories innumerable for local and metropolitan papers. He has had many tales accepted by magazines.
His last visit to the Tidings office was Saturday morning.
-------------------------------------------------------
Medford, Tuesday, May 2, 1939
JOHN GRIFFIN, PIONEER, LAID TO LAST REST IN OLD GRIFFIN CEMETERY
John B. Griffin, one of the first white children born in southern Oregon, was laid to rest this afternoon in the Griffin creek cemetery, the interment being the final chapter in the long and colorful life of Jackson county's famous son.
The Conger chapel was crowded with friends as the last rites were conducted by the Rev. D. E. Millard. A hymn, "In the Sweet By and By," was sung by the Rev. Mr. Millard and Mrs. Millard.
Pallbearers were F. D. Wagner, Lew Reynolds and Hugo Reinbold of Ashland and William R. Coleman, J. B. Coleman and Syd I. Brown of Medford.
Mr. Griffin died Sunday morning in the home of his niece, Mrs. Emma Davis, in Ashland. He was in his 86th year.

Son of Burrel Griffin & Sarah Throckmorton, married Bernetta Naylor May 5, 1878
------------
May 1, 1939
JOHN B. GRIFFIN COLORFUL PIONEER CALLED TO REST
Heart Attack Strikes 'Uncle John' in 86th Year---Born in Jacksonville When City Was Metropolis.
John B. Griffin, famed and colorful pioneer character of southern Oregon, died Sunday morning in the home of his niece, Mrs. Emma Davis, 107 Seventh steet, Ashland. He was in his 86th year.
While not enjoying the best of health in recent months, Mr. Griffin had been about as usual. He was stricken after dinner Saturday evening with a heart attack from which he did not rally.
Mr. Griffin, known familiarly as "Uncle John," was noted for his story-telling proclivities. He wove intriguing yarns about his big game hunting in southern Oregon forests, featuring particularly his experiences with bears. Many of his hunting stories were published in Oregon newspapers.
Loved To Hunt
He was an enthusiastic woodsman and loved the life of a frontiersman, deriving much enjoyment from hunting and fishing. For many years the name of John Griffin was synonomous with big game hunting in southern Oregon and the wildest regions were familiar grounds to him and his bear dogs, which also were famous throughout this part of the state.
Mr. Griffin was born in Jacksonville on September 14, 1853, when the city was the thriving metropolis of southern Oregon and an exciting center of gold mining. He was one of the oldest native sons of Jackson county and one of the first white children born in this part of the state.
Retired for many years, Uncle John spent his last years in telling and writing his experiences and in cultivating friendhips. Stern but yet gentle, he made friends easily and many men and women, old and young, today mourned his death.
On May 5, 1878, Mr. Griffin was married to Miss Nettie Naylor, daughter of Granville Naylor, a pioneer whose land claim was situated on Griffin creek near Jacksonville. Mrs. Griffin died a number of years ago.
Three Survive
Three children survive. Mrs. Abbie Bailey of Merrill, Lawrence Griffin of Bly and Evertt Griffin of Trinidad, Cal. Survivors also include five great-grandchildren.
Funeral services will be held in the Conger chapel at 2:30 p.m. Tuesday, the Rev. D. E. Millard officiating. Interment will be made in the Griffin creek cemetery.
In a recent article in the Oregon Journal Mr. Griffin told of his life in the following words:
"My father, Burrell B. Griffin, was born in Kentucky, May 13, 1808. My mother was born in one of the Carolinas, July 22, 1808. They were married in Missouri, March 22, 1829. All of their 13 children have lived to a good old age except Amos Campbell, who was born and died in 1836.
"My parents, with their children, crossed the plains in 1848 by ox team. Father and mother took a donation claim half a mile from Scio. In the spring of 1849 father and my oldest brother went to California. They got a good claim and took out a good amount of gold. Father believed he could return any time and get another claim, so he sold his claim and he and my brother came back to Linn county. As they passed the Rogue River valley father was struck with admiration of the timber, the numerous streams and the grass, belly-high to his horse. Father and the family moved to the Rogue River valley in the spring of 1852 and took a donation claim four miles southesat of Jacksonville, on a creek named for him and still known as Griffin creek.
"Father bought a band of cattle and some fine horses, built a house and barn and began improving his claim. Not long after the Indians went on the warpath and killed nine of father's horses. He sent a runner to Jacksonville, and some men came and escorted the family to Jacksonville, where they stayed till the trouble was over.
"Father was lieutenant in Captain Miller's company. They had a fight with Old John and his band, August 12, on Applegate creek, near the mouth of Williams creek. Father, with 20 men, went to Sterling creek and destroyed the Indian village there. Next day they went to Williams creek, where they were ambushed and father was wounded with a bullet through his right leg. Francis Garnet was killed. They killed or wounded five Indians. The two oldest of my brothers joined the volunteers and fought with father. Father was wounded twice---once with a bullet in the leg and once in the shoulder with an arrow.
"I was born September 14, 1853, at Jacksonville. I lived on our ranch on Griffin creek 'till I was 25. In 1878 I married Nettie Naylor, whose father, Granville Naylor, built the first sawmill in Jackson county. My wife and I celebrated our 57th wedding anniversary. She died March 14, 1936.
"We took a homestead in the Dead Indian country in 1886. We ran a dairy there seven years. My wife attended to the buttermaking while I did the hunting. We sold butter and venison to the people of Ashland. In those days there were lots of deer, elks, bears, wildcats and cougars in that country. I had a dog that treed over 100 bears in the Cascade range. When he died I had a notice of his death printed in the paper.
"Our children attended school at Phoenix. Later we moved to Grants Pass, where the children continued their schooling. We bought a ranch in Illinois valley, near Sucker creek, and lived there for many years. I traded this ranch for property in Medford, where we lived 'till the death of my wife. I then moved to Ashland."
-------------------------------------------------
The Ashland Tidings, date unknown:
EXCITING LIFE OF VETERAN IS ENDED SUNDAY
Born at Jacksonville, 1853, While Parents Were "Forted" Up Fighting Indians; Third White Child In Co.
John B. Griffin, colorful figure in Ashland or Jackson county, a native son, born in Jacksonville while his parents, Mr. and Mrs. Burrel B. Giffin were forted up on account of Indians being on the war path, passed away at the home of his niece, Mrs. Emma Davis, 107 Seventh Street, Sunday morning at 8:30 o'clock. A heart attack was suffered Saturday evening, from which he did not regain consciousness.
Funeral services will be at the Conger Funeral chapel in Medford Tuesday afternoon at 2:30 o'clock, the Rev. D. E. Millard minister in charge.
Mr. Griffin was born September 14, 1853, in Jacksonville, the youngest of 11 children. On the fifth day of May, 1878, he was married to Nettie Naylor, daughter of Mr. and Mrs. Granville Naylor, also Jackson county pioneers of '53.
Three children survive, two sons, Evart D. and Lawrence L., of Bly, Oregon, and Abbie Aula (Mrs. W. C. Bailey) of Klamath Falls. Mrs. Griffin passed away several years ago.
John Bell Griffin, the third white child born in Jackson county grew up amid the primitive environment of a new land, obtaining what schooling he could, and by force of circumstances compelled at an early age to assist in providing a living for himself and for the family. His father and older brothers served in the Indian wars and he early learned to use a gun. By the time he reached his teens he was an excellent shot, and was hunting the bear and deer of the country.
His hunting stories are sagas of this section and he has an unpublished manuscript of the hunting of bear and big game in the pioneer days of southern Oregon.
Known throughout the state as the "bear hunter," he and his dog Trailer have figured in stories innumerable for local and metropolitan papers. He has had many tales accepted by magazines.
His last visit to the Tidings office was Saturday morning.
-------------------------------------------------------
Medford, Tuesday, May 2, 1939
JOHN GRIFFIN, PIONEER, LAID TO LAST REST IN OLD GRIFFIN CEMETERY
John B. Griffin, one of the first white children born in southern Oregon, was laid to rest this afternoon in the Griffin creek cemetery, the interment being the final chapter in the long and colorful life of Jackson county's famous son.
The Conger chapel was crowded with friends as the last rites were conducted by the Rev. D. E. Millard. A hymn, "In the Sweet By and By," was sung by the Rev. Mr. Millard and Mrs. Millard.
Pallbearers were F. D. Wagner, Lew Reynolds and Hugo Reinbold of Ashland and William R. Coleman, J. B. Coleman and Syd I. Brown of Medford.
Mr. Griffin died Sunday morning in the home of his niece, Mrs. Emma Davis, in Ashland. He was in his 86th year.


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  • Created by: Darlene
  • Added: 20 Oct 2004
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 9683000
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9683000/john-bell-griffin: accessed ), memorial page for John Bell Griffin (14 Sep 1853–30 Apr 1939), Find a Grave Memorial ID 9683000, citing Old Griffin Creek Cemetery, Jackson County, Oregon, USA; Maintained by Darlene (contributor 46635178).