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COL Haldimand Sumner Putnam

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COL Haldimand Sumner Putnam

Birth
Cornish City, Sullivan County, New Hampshire, USA
Death
18 Jul 1863 (aged 26)
South Carolina, USA
Burial
Cornish City, Sullivan County, New Hampshire, USA
Memorial ID
96714940 View Source

Son of John Lyscom and Adeline M. Sumner. He was a graduate of West Point in June, 1857. Breveted 2nd Lieutenant Topographic Engineers July 1, 1857, appointed 2nd Lieutenant April 1, 1861, 1st Lieutenant August 3, 1861, and Captain Engineers March 3, 1863, was Breveted Major July 1, 1861 for gallant and meritorious services in the Manassas Campaign during the Civil War. Commissioned by the Governor of New Hampshire as Colonel of the 7th Regiment of Volunteers on October 15, 1861. He was in command of the 2nd Brigade during the attack on Fort Wagner, South Carolina, July 18, 1863. He advanced with the Brigade to the top of the southeast angle, where he was shot through the head wherein the tumult and darkness in the almost utter impossibility of crossing the line of fire, his body was left for the Rebels to bury. His body was never found.

(Information is from the History of Cornish, New Hampshire with Genealogical Record 1763-1910 written by William H. Child and History of the Seventh N.H. Vols. 1861-5.)

Son of John Lyscom and Adeline M. Sumner. He was a graduate of West Point in June, 1857. Breveted 2nd Lieutenant Topographic Engineers July 1, 1857, appointed 2nd Lieutenant April 1, 1861, 1st Lieutenant August 3, 1861, and Captain Engineers March 3, 1863, was Breveted Major July 1, 1861 for gallant and meritorious services in the Manassas Campaign during the Civil War. Commissioned by the Governor of New Hampshire as Colonel of the 7th Regiment of Volunteers on October 15, 1861. He was in command of the 2nd Brigade during the attack on Fort Wagner, South Carolina, July 18, 1863. He advanced with the Brigade to the top of the southeast angle, where he was shot through the head wherein the tumult and darkness in the almost utter impossibility of crossing the line of fire, his body was left for the Rebels to bury. His body was never found.

(Information is from the History of Cornish, New Hampshire with Genealogical Record 1763-1910 written by William H. Child and History of the Seventh N.H. Vols. 1861-5.)

Gravesite Details

Haldimand Putnam's body was never found. The stone in the Old Trinity Cemetery is a cenotaph.


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