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 Jehu Wickersham

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Jehu Wickersham

Birth
Marlboro, Chester County, Pennsylvania, USA
Death
27 Apr 1838 (aged 91)
Centerville, Wayne County, Indiana, USA
Burial
Centerville, Wayne County, Indiana, USA
Memorial ID
9550570 View Source

Jehu visited Nantucket Island for a time, then made a prospecting journey into North Carolina in 1767. After his marriage he settled in Guilford County, where he attended New Garden and later Deep River MM. He also sojourned for six years, 1772-1778 , in Newberry County, South Carolina where he was a member of Bush River MM. After several moves in the Carolinas, he moved to Indiana in 1814 and is found in West Grove MM, Wayne County. He was appointed to lay out a road in 1824 from the Quaker meeting house at Duck Creek in Henry County, Indiana to intersect with the county road leading from New Castle, Indiana.

Source: Yoder, Quaker Sketches, p. 67; Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Genealogy, vol i, pp 581, 844; Heller, Historic Henry County 1820-1849, vol i, pp 47, 91.

He was what early Quakers called a mystic, and among his papers was found the following:

"THE VISION OF JEHU WICKERSHAM

Ye 13th of ye 12 mo. 1783

Being unwell possest with many wandering thoughts in the night season toward day I slep easy and thought I saw the state of man as followeth. I thought I was in a city in which stood a lofty stately building which I went into very high were appeared a large room beautiful adorned with a large table in the middle surrounded with beautiful chairs and railes round the chairs at a little distance & in one of chair there appeared to be a loose coat or cloak and right before it on the table there lay a wig & a pipe which appeared as though that persumtious man that had spent so many thousands through prid & vanity in order to exceed others had been struck dead in a moment. Seeing things in this order I went about uttering words nearly to this import.

O what a pity it is that so many thousand bright ingenious men have for this many ages & generations past used all their art & contrivance to exceed each other in pride & vanity & what of it all now for now there is not a son nor a daughter on earth to heir any of it for the great & awful day now is come & all is over, all is over. Thus I thought I went about the room many times juttering these words. Then I thought I had a prospect how things were to be when I had viewed & lamented the unhappy state of man. I thought at that time there was not a living soul on earth except my self & 1 or 2 in that City...."

Source: Yoder Quaker Sketches, p. 68

Davis, Sheldon, Escalante, "The Wickersham Family in America," Heritage Books, Inc. 2001

Jehu Wickersham and Mary Kirk Wickersham had ten children. Among them was a daughter named Sarah, who was the mother of William G Wickersham. On 6 Nov 1809 the women's meeting of Deep River MM, Guilford, NC entered the following. "Deep River preparative meeting complains of Sarah Wickersham for having a child in an unmarried state. Jemima Baldwin and Ann Bond are appointed to visit her on the occasion and report their care to the next meeting." Society of Friends, Deep river Monthly Meeting, Women's' Minutes

Sarah was restored to the Quaker faith by Deep River MM on 1 Aug 1814. She was granted a certificate to Whitewater MM in the Indiana Territory on 3 Oct 1814 and was received at Whitewater on 24 Jun 1815. She and her son William were received in membership at the Whitewater MM on 24 Feb 1816. At the time of 1860 Federal Census for Centre Township, Wayne County, Indiana. Sarah and her daughter-in-law, Idema, were living in the household of Idema's son, Calvin Wickersham.

Sarah married Jacob Griffin May 22, 1824 in Wayne Co., IN. He died Jan 14, 1845 in Wayne Co.,IN. Sarah died Feb.5, 1870 in Wayne Co. IN.

Obituary: Sarah Griffin, a pioneer settler of this county, died on the 5th inst. at the residence of her grandson, Isom Wickersham in Centerville, aged 88 years.
The Richmond Radical, Richmond, Indiana 2/20/1870.

Jehu visited Nantucket Island for a time, then made a prospecting journey into North Carolina in 1767. After his marriage he settled in Guilford County, where he attended New Garden and later Deep River MM. He also sojourned for six years, 1772-1778 , in Newberry County, South Carolina where he was a member of Bush River MM. After several moves in the Carolinas, he moved to Indiana in 1814 and is found in West Grove MM, Wayne County. He was appointed to lay out a road in 1824 from the Quaker meeting house at Duck Creek in Henry County, Indiana to intersect with the county road leading from New Castle, Indiana.

Source: Yoder, Quaker Sketches, p. 67; Hinshaw, Encyclopedia of American Genealogy, vol i, pp 581, 844; Heller, Historic Henry County 1820-1849, vol i, pp 47, 91.

He was what early Quakers called a mystic, and among his papers was found the following:

"THE VISION OF JEHU WICKERSHAM

Ye 13th of ye 12 mo. 1783

Being unwell possest with many wandering thoughts in the night season toward day I slep easy and thought I saw the state of man as followeth. I thought I was in a city in which stood a lofty stately building which I went into very high were appeared a large room beautiful adorned with a large table in the middle surrounded with beautiful chairs and railes round the chairs at a little distance & in one of chair there appeared to be a loose coat or cloak and right before it on the table there lay a wig & a pipe which appeared as though that persumtious man that had spent so many thousands through prid & vanity in order to exceed others had been struck dead in a moment. Seeing things in this order I went about uttering words nearly to this import.

O what a pity it is that so many thousand bright ingenious men have for this many ages & generations past used all their art & contrivance to exceed each other in pride & vanity & what of it all now for now there is not a son nor a daughter on earth to heir any of it for the great & awful day now is come & all is over, all is over. Thus I thought I went about the room many times juttering these words. Then I thought I had a prospect how things were to be when I had viewed & lamented the unhappy state of man. I thought at that time there was not a living soul on earth except my self & 1 or 2 in that City...."

Source: Yoder Quaker Sketches, p. 68

Davis, Sheldon, Escalante, "The Wickersham Family in America," Heritage Books, Inc. 2001

Jehu Wickersham and Mary Kirk Wickersham had ten children. Among them was a daughter named Sarah, who was the mother of William G Wickersham. On 6 Nov 1809 the women's meeting of Deep River MM, Guilford, NC entered the following. "Deep River preparative meeting complains of Sarah Wickersham for having a child in an unmarried state. Jemima Baldwin and Ann Bond are appointed to visit her on the occasion and report their care to the next meeting." Society of Friends, Deep river Monthly Meeting, Women's' Minutes

Sarah was restored to the Quaker faith by Deep River MM on 1 Aug 1814. She was granted a certificate to Whitewater MM in the Indiana Territory on 3 Oct 1814 and was received at Whitewater on 24 Jun 1815. She and her son William were received in membership at the Whitewater MM on 24 Feb 1816. At the time of 1860 Federal Census for Centre Township, Wayne County, Indiana. Sarah and her daughter-in-law, Idema, were living in the household of Idema's son, Calvin Wickersham.

Sarah married Jacob Griffin May 22, 1824 in Wayne Co., IN. He died Jan 14, 1845 in Wayne Co.,IN. Sarah died Feb.5, 1870 in Wayne Co. IN.

Obituary: Sarah Griffin, a pioneer settler of this county, died on the 5th inst. at the residence of her grandson, Isom Wickersham in Centerville, aged 88 years.
The Richmond Radical, Richmond, Indiana 2/20/1870.


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