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 Philip Haddox Coe

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Philip Haddox Coe

Birth
Edgefield County, South Carolina, USA
Death 14 Dec 1852 (aged 52)
Gonzales County, Texas, USA
Burial Monthalia, Gonzales County, Texas, USA
Memorial ID 9321796 View Source
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PHILIP ALEXANDER HADDOX3 COE (Rachel2, Edward1) was born January 10, 1800, in Edgefield County, SC. Raised in Georgia, he was a son of Moses and Rachel (Coe) Haddox of near Thomaston, Upson County. Wanted for murder there, he had a reward of $750 on his head, part of which was supplied by the victim's family, part by the governor of Georgia. To avoid detection, he added his mother's maiden name to his own and left the state. Described in Georgia newspaper accounts as "a man of a powerful frame, upwards of six feet . . . dark hair, grey eyes . . . and well proportioned," it was rumored he had gone to Texas.

Texas Hero. Arrived in Texas in 1829. Homesteaded 4,466 acres under Mexican and Spanish titles, May 4, 1831. Captain in the Tawakoni Indian campaign in 1835. Delegate from Washington Municipality to the Texas Consulation in 1835. Captain in the First Regiment of Texas Volunteers in 1836 during the Texas Revolution. Served under Sidney Sherman and was sent to assist at the Alamo. Commander of the baggage train at San Jacinto. Captain of Company A in the Somervell Expedition in 1842.

As infamously as murder had brought Coe to public attention, his life was ended by the same fate. Engaged in a poker game in a Gonzales County saloon December 6, 1852, he was shot by John Oliver. Mortally wounded, he rode his horse home to Coe Valley where he died December 14 after writing a will, later recorded at the Gonzales County Courthouse. Beginning, "... being severely wounded and my life uncertain," he divided his estate, numerous slaves, race horses and stock among his wife Elizabeth, ten daughters and two living sons. Burial was at the family cemetery in Coe Valley, where a Texas Centennial marker was erected in 1936.

Ironically, Oliver was Coe's neighbor. In the same manner as Coe's notoriety had begun, his family offered a $1,000 reward for Oliver's arrest. Texas Governor P. Hansborough Bell (1849-53) added $300 because of Coe's prominence. Coe's son Philip Houston Coe died in the same manner, gunned down in the streets of Abilene, KS, by legendary Abilene marshal James Butler "Wild Bill" Hickok. To add to the irony, Coe's first child born in Texas, daughter Sarah Adeline, married Addison Pleasant Towns, nephew of Georgia Governor George W. Towns (1847-51).Changed his name to Philip Alexander Haddox Coe (took his mother's maiden name) & married soon after arriving in Texas. Remember, he was a fugitive, wanted for murder in Georgia. Probably changed other facts, also. Claimed he was from Alabama, where his dad's brother, Wm M, lived.

Married Elizabeth Ann Parker in Washington County, Texas near Brenham.

1n 1936, a memorial was placed on his grave....

Fought in several conflicts during Texas Independence history. Early member of the Texas Rangers.


Gravesite Details they all lived near Monthalia. "Monthalia was originally called Mount Thalia. Some early settlers arrived as early as 1846. They included a Captain Phil Coe who was buried on what became known as ‘the old Towns place’ west of Monthalia k


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  • Created by: Carl Robert Coe
  • Added: 15 Aug 2004
  • Find a Grave Memorial 9321796
  • Find a Grave, database and images (www.findagrave.com/memorial/9321796/philip-haddox-coe : accessed ), memorial page for Philip Haddox Coe (10 Jan 1800–14 Dec 1852), Find a Grave Memorial ID 9321796, citing Coe Valley Cemetery, Monthalia, Gonzales County, Texas, USA ; Maintained by Carl Robert Coe (contributor 46623827) .