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Lieut Francis John Brooke

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Lieut Francis John Brooke

Birth
Virginia, USA
Death 25 Dec 1837 (aged 31–32)
Okeechobee, Okeechobee County, Florida, USA
Burial Lemay, St. Louis County, Missouri, USA
Memorial ID 9270553 View Source

FRANCIS J. BROOKE
USMA CLASS OF 1826
CULLUM'S REGISTER # 460

SECOND LIEUT. - 7TH INFANTRY -1826
FRONTIER DUTY, LA., I.T., 1827-1828
GARRISON, JEFFERSON BARRACKS, MO , 1828-1831, 1832-1833
EXPEDITION TO UPPER ARKANSAS - 1829
" BLACK HAWK " WAR - 1832
ADJUTANT, 6TH INFANTRY, 1833-1836
FIRST LIEUT., 6TH INFANTRY - 1836
FRONTIER DUTY, LA. - 1836
FLORIDA WAR VETERAN - 1837
KIA, BATTLE OF OKEECHOBEE, 25 DECEMBER 1837
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CULLUM'S REGISTER

460 ........ ( Born Va. ) ........ FRANCIS J. BROOKE ........ ( Ap'd Va. ) ........ 32

Military History : --- Cadet at the Military Academy, July 1, 1822 to July 1, 1826, when he was graduated and promoted in the Army to

BVT. SECOND LIEUT., 7TH INFANTRY, JULY 1, 1826

SECOND LIEUT., 6TH INFANTRY, JULY 1, 1826

Served : on frontier duty at Ft. Jesup, La., 1827 ,--- Ft. Towson, I. T. , 1827 , --- Ft. Jesup, La., 1827, --- and in opening Military Road to Ft. Towson, I. T., 1827-28 ; in garrison at Jefferson barracks, Mo., 1828-29 ; on expedition to Upper Arkansas, 1829 ; in garrison at efferson Barracks, Mo., 1829-31 ; in the " Black Hawk " War against the Sac Indians, 1832 , being engaged in the Battle of Bad Axe River, Aug. 2, 1832 ; in garrison at Jefferson Barracks., 1832-33 ; as Adjutant, 6th Infantry, at Regimental Headquarters, Apr. 1, 1833 to Aug. 1, 1836 ; on frontier duty at

( FIRST LIEUT., 6TH INFANTRY, MAY 6, 1835 )

Camp sabine, La., 1836, --- and Ft. Jesup, La., 1836 ; and in the Florida War against the Seminole Indians, 1837, being engaged in the Battle of Okeechobee, where he was

KILLED, DEC. 2, 1837, AGED 35

BURIED, JEFFERSON BARRACKS NATIONAL CEMETERY ***

*** NOTE: Lieut. Brooke was killed by the enemy's concentrated deadly fire upon five companies of his regiment, while pressing forward to the attack, like a " moving battery " , till nearly cut up, and few were left uninjured. In the language of the official dispatch of the battle, " Captain Van Swearingen, Lieutenant Brooke, and Lieutenant Center, who fell on that day , had no superior of their years in the service, and in point of chivalry ranked among the first in the Army or nation. "

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FAMILY :

FATHER : John Taliaferro Brooke, ( 17 August 1763 - 1822 ), son of Richard Brooke, was born August 27, 1763, at Smithfield, an old family estate on the Rappahannock River four miles below Fredericksburg, and died on his estate, Millvale , in Stafford County, West Virginia, in 1822, aged fifty-nine years. He studied for the legal profession and practiced law for a time in Fredericksburg, but later retired to his plantation, where he spent the remainder of his days. For many years he sat on the bench of the county court of Stafford County, serving also for many years as justice of the peace. He served as first lieutenant of artillery in the Revolutionary War, at the age of eighteen, and in recognition of his gallant conduct at the Battle of Eutaw was promoted to brigade major of the park of artillery by Charles Harrison, who commanded it, and was invited by him to live with him " in the same marquee to the end of the war. He married Anne Mercer Selden, and they were the parents of five children.

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ARMY AND NAVY CHRONICLE
Volume VI
From January 1, to June 30, 1838

From the " ST LOUIS BULLETIN "

LIEUT. BROOKE. ---- We know not when our sensibilities have been more deeply affected, than upon hearing the melancholy intelligence of the death of this young officer. He was a gentleman, giving bright promise to military distinction ; and bid fair to realize the fondest anticipations of his friends. He was not only beloved by familiar associates, but by every portion of society. He had justly won the admiration of all , and had found for himself a place in almost every bosom. His career has been brief but beautiful. His form rests in a far distant land, but it is the glorious grave of the soldier. In ancient times they who fell upon their country's battle field were esteemed most happy, and perhaps we should not mourn too much over his honorable end. His lifeless relics are sleeping quietly among the green everglades of the land of flowers , and his name will live in the bright pages of our history.

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BATTLEFIELD PRESERVATION AND LEGACY

Two years after the battle, members of the U. S. military returned to Lake Okeechobee to remove the bodies of the fallen officers and reinter them at Jefferson Barracks in Missouri. Then, in 1842, the military sent out another disinterment expedition to bring all the war dead to the St. Augustine barracks cemetery, although it is uncertain if they removed all of the soldiers interred near Lake Okeechonbee.


Inscription

All killed in battle at Okeechobee, Florida.

Gravesite Details

s/w Col. Richard Gentry, Capt. Joseph VanSwearingen, and Lt. John P. Center

Flowers

In their memory
Plant Memorial Trees

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