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 Abijah Joslyn Wellman

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Abijah Joslyn Wellman

Birth
Friendship, Allegany County, New York, USA
Death
8 Jun 1889 (aged 53)
Friendship, Allegany County, New York, USA
Burial
Friendship, Allegany County, New York, USA
Memorial ID
92120232 View Source

Son of Jonas & Kezia (Joslyn) Wellman.

Vet-CW: Hon discharge 3/24/1863 due to being severly wounded in the head at battle of Fair Oaks lon 5/31/1862 at which time he was a Lt. Col. in Co C 85th NY Vol

Note: 1872 delegate to National Republican convention at Philadelphia; in 1873 chosen as Senator from the 30th District and continued through 1877 -- per History of Allegany Co.

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WELLMAN, Abijah Josyln – Belmont [NY] Weekly Dispatch, Tues., 6/111/1889 p?c2 (via Old Fulton NY Postcards) – OBIT #1
"COL. ABIJAH J. WELLMAN.
An Esteemed and Benevolent Man at Rest.
The saddest lot that befalls a newspaper man is to chronicle the death of a friend. Such is the task of the writer in this instance. Col. Abijah J. Wellman, of Friendship, for a period of nineteen years was a warm and substantial friend to the DISPATCH's editors, and it was with great grief that we learned of his death, which occurred at ten minutes after two o'clock the morning of the 8th inst. The deceased had been a sufferer from Bright's disease for a number of years, but had bravely fought for his life, and although in he had been rapidly failing this spring, his death cast a gloom over the entire town and was received with greatest regret throughout the county.
Colonel Abijah J. Wellman, son of Jonas and Kesiah [sic] Wellman, was born at Friendship, N. Y., on the 6th of May, 1836, and at the time of his demise was a few days more than 53 years of age.
His father was born in Vermont, 1799, removed to Friendship in 1829; was an eminently successful physician, and died in 1844, when Abijah was but eight years of age, in the prime of his manhood and in the midst of a highly successful career.
Col. Wellman engaged in the mercantile business in 1855, before he was of age, in banking in 1860, and in lumbering in 1864, in all of which he was actively engaged up to the time of his death. In 1882 he engaged extensively in the oil business, and was a large and successful operator in the Allegany oil field.
At the organization of the First National Bank of Friendship, in 1864, he was chosen its cashier, which position he held at the time of his death. The great success of this firm and reliable banking institution is due largely and mainly to his wise judgment and successful financeering.
In September, 1861, he was appointed Captain of a company of volunteers, recruited mostly by himself, and which subsequently became Company C, 85th N. Y. Volunteers. At the organization of the regiment he was appointed Major, with rank dating from Nov. 7, 1861; and was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, March 14, 1862. He was severely wounded in the head at the battle of Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862, and carried a conspicuous scar the remainder of his life, as a reminder of that memorable and desperately fought engagement. It was by reason of disability, resulting from the above mentioned wound that he was discharged March 24, 1863, and it is thought by many that the wound indirectly was the prime cause of his death, as he suffered greatly from it at times.
Col. Wellman was married, September 17, 1863, to Kate, daughter of Hon. Asher W. Miner, who, together with four children, (A. Miner, Roy, Guy, and Miss Blanche) survive him. A son just budding into a promising manhood, a noble, upright, Christian young man, (Raymond), was suddenly striken down a few years ago. This was at the commencement of the Colonels disease, and was a crushing blow to him and to his family.
For several successive years, commencing in 1866, he was supervisor of Friendship, and for the latter three years of the time was chairman of the Board of Supervisors.
In 1872 he was a delegate to the National Republican Convention at Philadelphia, that nominated Grant and Wilson.
In 1873 he was chosen as senator from the 30th senatorial district, which then comprised the counties of Allegany, Wyoming, and Livingston. His service in the senate continued through the years 1874, 1875, 1876 and 1877. He was assigned to four committees, being a member on Banks and internal affairs of towns and counties, also chairman of Militia and State prisons. In the latter capacity he had much to do with the framing of the legislation of that period relating to reform in the State Prison system, under the amended constitution, which resulted in a change so favorable to the revenues of the State.
Thus briefly is recalled the public life, military and civic, of one of god's noblest men! He was never accused of a single dishonest act, he never was dishonest. In politics and in business he was honest and upright.
He was the leader and stay of the Baptist church of Friendship, was its S. S. superintendent for 24 years, and it was through his indomitable will only that the imposing and magnificent house of worship that graces lower Main street was erected. He was a great Bible student and a conscientious Christian. His purse was always open to the poor, and his unostentatious and quiet acts of charity could not be told. The needy and destitute were cared for always by his liberal hand. He was more closely identified with the business interests and growth of the town than any other man, and in his death, the business interests of Friendship received a severe blow.
In his beautiful home he was a model husband—a most kind and indulgent parent. His was an ideal household of refined happiness and mutual felicity.
The funeral was held yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock, at the brick church and his remains were interred in the family lot beneath the statue-monument in Mt. Hope. All business was stopped and all business places closed from 1 until 4 o'clock—a just mark of respect and a meager tribute at best to a most honored and beloved citizen.
He will be missed in Friendship's business, religious and social circles—he will be missed in all the notable walks of life,--but his family will miss him so much more! To them, in general with the community, and personally, the editors of the DISPATCH extend saddest sympathy. We, too, have lost a friend dear and true.
He is ‘at rest.' Eternal peace, joy, happiness—the rich reward of a loving God to His faithful servant—are his enjoyments."

Son of Jonas & Kezia (Joslyn) Wellman.

Vet-CW: Hon discharge 3/24/1863 due to being severly wounded in the head at battle of Fair Oaks lon 5/31/1862 at which time he was a Lt. Col. in Co C 85th NY Vol

Note: 1872 delegate to National Republican convention at Philadelphia; in 1873 chosen as Senator from the 30th District and continued through 1877 -- per History of Allegany Co.

--------------

WELLMAN, Abijah Josyln – Belmont [NY] Weekly Dispatch, Tues., 6/111/1889 p?c2 (via Old Fulton NY Postcards) – OBIT #1
"COL. ABIJAH J. WELLMAN.
An Esteemed and Benevolent Man at Rest.
The saddest lot that befalls a newspaper man is to chronicle the death of a friend. Such is the task of the writer in this instance. Col. Abijah J. Wellman, of Friendship, for a period of nineteen years was a warm and substantial friend to the DISPATCH's editors, and it was with great grief that we learned of his death, which occurred at ten minutes after two o'clock the morning of the 8th inst. The deceased had been a sufferer from Bright's disease for a number of years, but had bravely fought for his life, and although in he had been rapidly failing this spring, his death cast a gloom over the entire town and was received with greatest regret throughout the county.
Colonel Abijah J. Wellman, son of Jonas and Kesiah [sic] Wellman, was born at Friendship, N. Y., on the 6th of May, 1836, and at the time of his demise was a few days more than 53 years of age.
His father was born in Vermont, 1799, removed to Friendship in 1829; was an eminently successful physician, and died in 1844, when Abijah was but eight years of age, in the prime of his manhood and in the midst of a highly successful career.
Col. Wellman engaged in the mercantile business in 1855, before he was of age, in banking in 1860, and in lumbering in 1864, in all of which he was actively engaged up to the time of his death. In 1882 he engaged extensively in the oil business, and was a large and successful operator in the Allegany oil field.
At the organization of the First National Bank of Friendship, in 1864, he was chosen its cashier, which position he held at the time of his death. The great success of this firm and reliable banking institution is due largely and mainly to his wise judgment and successful financeering.
In September, 1861, he was appointed Captain of a company of volunteers, recruited mostly by himself, and which subsequently became Company C, 85th N. Y. Volunteers. At the organization of the regiment he was appointed Major, with rank dating from Nov. 7, 1861; and was promoted to Lieutenant Colonel, March 14, 1862. He was severely wounded in the head at the battle of Fair Oaks, May 31, 1862, and carried a conspicuous scar the remainder of his life, as a reminder of that memorable and desperately fought engagement. It was by reason of disability, resulting from the above mentioned wound that he was discharged March 24, 1863, and it is thought by many that the wound indirectly was the prime cause of his death, as he suffered greatly from it at times.
Col. Wellman was married, September 17, 1863, to Kate, daughter of Hon. Asher W. Miner, who, together with four children, (A. Miner, Roy, Guy, and Miss Blanche) survive him. A son just budding into a promising manhood, a noble, upright, Christian young man, (Raymond), was suddenly striken down a few years ago. This was at the commencement of the Colonels disease, and was a crushing blow to him and to his family.
For several successive years, commencing in 1866, he was supervisor of Friendship, and for the latter three years of the time was chairman of the Board of Supervisors.
In 1872 he was a delegate to the National Republican Convention at Philadelphia, that nominated Grant and Wilson.
In 1873 he was chosen as senator from the 30th senatorial district, which then comprised the counties of Allegany, Wyoming, and Livingston. His service in the senate continued through the years 1874, 1875, 1876 and 1877. He was assigned to four committees, being a member on Banks and internal affairs of towns and counties, also chairman of Militia and State prisons. In the latter capacity he had much to do with the framing of the legislation of that period relating to reform in the State Prison system, under the amended constitution, which resulted in a change so favorable to the revenues of the State.
Thus briefly is recalled the public life, military and civic, of one of god's noblest men! He was never accused of a single dishonest act, he never was dishonest. In politics and in business he was honest and upright.
He was the leader and stay of the Baptist church of Friendship, was its S. S. superintendent for 24 years, and it was through his indomitable will only that the imposing and magnificent house of worship that graces lower Main street was erected. He was a great Bible student and a conscientious Christian. His purse was always open to the poor, and his unostentatious and quiet acts of charity could not be told. The needy and destitute were cared for always by his liberal hand. He was more closely identified with the business interests and growth of the town than any other man, and in his death, the business interests of Friendship received a severe blow.
In his beautiful home he was a model husband—a most kind and indulgent parent. His was an ideal household of refined happiness and mutual felicity.
The funeral was held yesterday afternoon at 2 o'clock, at the brick church and his remains were interred in the family lot beneath the statue-monument in Mt. Hope. All business was stopped and all business places closed from 1 until 4 o'clock—a just mark of respect and a meager tribute at best to a most honored and beloved citizen.
He will be missed in Friendship's business, religious and social circles—he will be missed in all the notable walks of life,--but his family will miss him so much more! To them, in general with the community, and personally, the editors of the DISPATCH extend saddest sympathy. We, too, have lost a friend dear and true.
He is ‘at rest.' Eternal peace, joy, happiness—the rich reward of a loving God to His faithful servant—are his enjoyments."


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