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 Caleb Dixon Septimus Brough

Caleb Dixon Septimus Brough

Birth
Silloth, Allerdale Borough, Cumbria, England
Death 19 Dec 1941 (aged 33)
At Sea
Burial Body lost at sea, Specifically: The ship he was on--the HMS Neptune--was sunk in World War II.
Memorial ID 91269119 · View Source
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Caleb Dixon Septimus Brough was born on 3 January 1908 in Silloth, Cumberland, England. He was the eighth child of Thomas Hodgson Brough and Mary Elizabeth Hetherington; and his Brough ancestry extends back to the 1600's in Cumberland, England.

Caleb was a Chief Petty Officer Telegraphist in the Royal Navy during World War II, and was killed-in-action when the HMS Neptune (a ship cruiser) was sunk on 19 December 1941 after hitting four mines in the Mediterranean Sea (between Malta and Libya). Caleb Brough was awarded the Royal Navy Service and Good Conduct Medal (see: Ancestry.com, "U.K. Naval Medal and Award Rolls, 1793-1972").

The following account of the sinking of the HMS Neptune is quoted here from Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/HMS_Neptune_(20):

HMS Neptune was a Leander class light cruiser with the Royal Navy during World War II. The Neptune was the fourth ship of its class and was the ninth Royal Navy vessel to carry the name. Built by Portsmouth Dockyard, the vessel was laid down on 24 September 1931, launched on 31 January 1933, and commissioned into the Royal Navy on 12 February 1934 with the pennant number "20". During World War II, Neptune operated with a crew drawn predominantly from the New Zealand Division of the Royal Navy.

The Royal Navy Task Force K was sent out on 18 December 1941, to intercept a convoy bound for Tripoli, Libya, right after the brief fleet engagement known as First Battle of Sirt. On the night of 19 December–20 December, Neptune, leading the line, struck two mines, part of a newly laid Italian minefield. The other cruisers present, Aurora and Penelope, also struck mines. While reversing out of the minefield, Neptune struck a third mine, which took off her propellers and left her dead in the water. Aurora was unable to render assistance as she was already down to 10 knots and needed to turn back to Malta. Penelope was also unable to assist. The destroyers Kandahar and Lively were sent into the minefield to attempt a tow. The former struck a mine and began drifting. Neptune then signalled for Lively to keep clear. (Kandahar was later evacuated and torpedoed by the destroyer HMS Jaguar to prevent her capture.) Neptune hit a fourth mine and quickly capsized. Only 30 seamen, out of her complement of 767, initially survived the sinking, and only one was still alive when their lifeboat was picked up five days later by the Italian torpedo boat Achille Papa.

Additional Internet sources about the sinking of the Neptune and its sole survivor can be found on-line at: http://ww2chat.com/war-sea/4614-service-hms-neptune.html.


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  • Created by: R. Clayton Brough
  • Added: 3 Jun 2012
  • Find A Grave Memorial 91269119
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Caleb Dixon Septimus Brough (2 Jan 1908–19 Dec 1941), Find A Grave Memorial no. 91269119, ; Maintained by R. Clayton Brough (contributor 47699379) Body lost at sea, who reports a The ship he was on--the HMS Neptune--was sunk in World War II..