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Fletcher Wilbur Stites

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Fletcher Wilbur Stites

Birth
Cape May, Cape May County, New Jersey, USA
Death
26 Jun 1933 (aged 51)
Narberth, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA
Burial
Bala Cynwyd, Montgomery County, Pennsylvania, USA Add to Map
Plot
Plymouth 216
Memorial ID
View Source
F.W. STITES.52, DIES AT NARBBERTH HOME
Former Penna. Senator Years Ago Won Distinction as Ball Player
Fletcher Stites, former Pennsylvania state senator and Philadelphia attorney, died suddenly last night at his home in Narberth, Pa. He was 52 and had been suffering for the last three years with high blood pressure.
Stites was born in Cape May and was educated in the schools there. While attending the University of Pennsylvania he won distinction on the baseball diamond, which brought him offers of contracts from major league teams. He was a third baseman. In summer seasons he played with the Cape May Collegians, then under the management of Roy Thomas, former Phillies outfielder, and was a popular figure in the cottage colony.
He was admitted to the bar in 1904 and in 1917 was elected to the State House of Representatives. As chairman of legislative committee to Investigate prisons in Pennsylvania, he was instrumental in bringing about reforms in the handling and housing of criminals. In 1922 he was elected to the State Senate.
In 1926, Stites was put forward as a candidate for the nomination of lieutenant governor of Pennsylvania, but withdrew from the race. He. stood attain for the Senate, but was defeated. Stites was president of the Keystone Indemnity Company, Philadelphia, operators of the Keystone Indemnity Exchange, which, was taken over by the Pennsylvania State Insurance Department a month ago.
The exchange approximately 20,000 members among motorists to whom it issued reciprocal automombile insurance policies.
Claims out standing against it at the time it was taken over by the state were reported to total about $175,000. Stites declared their "difficulties" were caused by the economic depression and that there were no irregularities.
This was followed by a declaration of Carl B. Metzger, conservator of the Narberth National Bank, that a heavy overdraft by Stites, a bank director, was probably the only thing preventing the bank being reopened on a 100 percent basis. The bank had been under restrictions since the moratorium, March 4.
Mr. Metzger said Stites had reduced the overdraft from $33,000 to $27,000 and was continuing to make weekly payments. Stites is survived by his widow, Mrs. Edith G. Austin Stites, and a son, Richard Lawrence Stites, a Harvard student and manager of the crew there.

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Tue, Jun 27, 1933, Page 1
F.W. STITES.52, DIES AT NARBBERTH HOME
Former Penna. Senator Years Ago Won Distinction as Ball Player
Fletcher Stites, former Pennsylvania state senator and Philadelphia attorney, died suddenly last night at his home in Narberth, Pa. He was 52 and had been suffering for the last three years with high blood pressure.
Stites was born in Cape May and was educated in the schools there. While attending the University of Pennsylvania he won distinction on the baseball diamond, which brought him offers of contracts from major league teams. He was a third baseman. In summer seasons he played with the Cape May Collegians, then under the management of Roy Thomas, former Phillies outfielder, and was a popular figure in the cottage colony.
He was admitted to the bar in 1904 and in 1917 was elected to the State House of Representatives. As chairman of legislative committee to Investigate prisons in Pennsylvania, he was instrumental in bringing about reforms in the handling and housing of criminals. In 1922 he was elected to the State Senate.
In 1926, Stites was put forward as a candidate for the nomination of lieutenant governor of Pennsylvania, but withdrew from the race. He. stood attain for the Senate, but was defeated. Stites was president of the Keystone Indemnity Company, Philadelphia, operators of the Keystone Indemnity Exchange, which, was taken over by the Pennsylvania State Insurance Department a month ago.
The exchange approximately 20,000 members among motorists to whom it issued reciprocal automombile insurance policies.
Claims out standing against it at the time it was taken over by the state were reported to total about $175,000. Stites declared their "difficulties" were caused by the economic depression and that there were no irregularities.
This was followed by a declaration of Carl B. Metzger, conservator of the Narberth National Bank, that a heavy overdraft by Stites, a bank director, was probably the only thing preventing the bank being reopened on a 100 percent basis. The bank had been under restrictions since the moratorium, March 4.
Mr. Metzger said Stites had reduced the overdraft from $33,000 to $27,000 and was continuing to make weekly payments. Stites is survived by his widow, Mrs. Edith G. Austin Stites, and a son, Richard Lawrence Stites, a Harvard student and manager of the crew there.

Courier-Post, Camden, New Jersey, Tue, Jun 27, 1933, Page 1

Gravesite Details

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