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 Richard Clarence Brookins

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Richard Clarence Brookins

Birth
Saint Louis, St. Louis County, Missouri, USA
Death
1933 (aged 53–54)
Oakland, Alameda County, California, USA
Burial
Hayward, Alameda County, California, USA
Memorial ID
91070944 View Source

Dick Brookins played several seasons in the Wisconsin State and Western Canada Leagues from 1906-1910.
Excerpt from Lancaster New Era, "The first Northern League disbanded in 1908, but before it did, Fargo infielder/outfield Richard Brookins reached a milestone -- 39 years before Jackie Robinson played for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Brookins became the first African-American to play organized baseball in the 20th century."

From Afros, Aboriginals and Amateur Sports in Pre World War One Canada: by Frank Cosentino
“An incident in western Canada provided some insight into the pecking order among Afros and Aboriginals in sports. In 1910 a man in the western Canada Baseball League named Brookins was declared ineligible as an “alleged black” to play for Regina against Medicine Hat. Although he did ultimately complete, the League supported Medicine Hat and awarded them the victory. In its defence Regina argued that Brookins was an Indian. But the League ruled otherwise. Its decision reflected “the one drop theory”, a relic of slavery and segregation, that divided humanity into two main races based on skin colour.”

Dick Brookins played several seasons in the Wisconsin State and Western Canada Leagues from 1906-1910.
Excerpt from Lancaster New Era, "The first Northern League disbanded in 1908, but before it did, Fargo infielder/outfield Richard Brookins reached a milestone -- 39 years before Jackie Robinson played for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Brookins became the first African-American to play organized baseball in the 20th century."

From Afros, Aboriginals and Amateur Sports in Pre World War One Canada: by Frank Cosentino
“An incident in western Canada provided some insight into the pecking order among Afros and Aboriginals in sports. In 1910 a man in the western Canada Baseball League named Brookins was declared ineligible as an “alleged black” to play for Regina against Medicine Hat. Although he did ultimately complete, the League supported Medicine Hat and awarded them the victory. In its defence Regina argued that Brookins was an Indian. But the League ruled otherwise. Its decision reflected “the one drop theory”, a relic of slavery and segregation, that divided humanity into two main races based on skin colour.”


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