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 Thomas “Tom” Campbell

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Thomas “Tom” Campbell

Birth
Carlisle, City of Carlisle, Cumbria, England
Death
30 Nov 1887 (aged 60)
Baltimore, Baltimore City, Maryland, USA
Burial
Baltimore, Baltimore City, Maryland, USA
Plot
Samuel D. Ross Lot 38, Area AA, Grave 3, 11 Walk 19 Lot South side
Memorial ID
90880857 View Source

Son of Robert and Elizabeth (Pollock) Campbell (married 14 November 1826, Parish of St. Mary, Carlisle, Cumberland, England). Until confirmation of Tom's birth or christening is found, alternate birthyears for him are 1826 and 1828, but the 1841 and 1851 English censuses yield an inferred birth year of 1827, and in his diary he claimed his birthday was April 30th. Burial and death records claim he died at age 60, which assertion yields a birth year of 1827. He was a grandson of Thomas Pollock, a weaver of Carlisle, and his wife, Ann Ruxton/Roxton Pollock.

At the age of 14 (1841 census) he was living with his family (including younger siblings Edward, Ann, Elizabeth, Jane, and Susannah) on the north side of Bridge Street in the Caldewgate section of Carlisle, Cumberland county, England, where his father worked as a warehouseman. By the time of the 1851 census, when he was 23, the family had moved to 10 Baxter Street in Hulme, Lancashire, England (today a neighborhood south of the city center of Manchester). There his father worked as a bookeeper, his brother Edward was a warehouseman, and he (Thomas) worked as a grocer.

Their father, Robert Campbell, died the following year (16 December 1852), age 50, of phthisis (tuberculosis), at his home at 37 Ravald Street in the Ancoats section of Manchester. Brother Edward, same address, was the informant for the death certificate. The 1861 and 1871 censuses subsequently show Robert Campbell's widow Elizabeth and her daughters living in Ancoats where the daughters were employed in the local mills.

The details of Tom Campbell's immigration to the United States are as yet unconfirmed. He may well have been the Thomas Campbell who emigrated to New York City from Liverpool on the ship WEST POINT, a 24-year-old clerk who arrived in July 1851. Tom did have an uncle and aunt, George and Mary Ann Pollock, living in Liverpool at that time. What is known is that by 1853 Tom lived in Zanesville, Ohio (where there were also Pollocks). He worked as a druggist in the drugstore of Bennet T. Whitaker and married his first wife, Margaret Smith, on 21 December 1853 (wedding performed and recorded in the Muskingum County marriage register by John Harrison, justice of the peace).

In his thirties, he fought for the Union in the Civil War, enlisting as a Private in the 122nd Regiment of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry, the Union Army's VI Corps, on 26 August 1862. He served as a hospital steward in Company I and kept a diary of his military adventures from 1862 to 1865, including a stint as a prisoner of war. He was mustered out 1 July 1865 at the war's end.

Margaret and Tom had at least six children all born in Zanesville and baptized at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church, including:

Robert Pollock Campbell (1855-1916)
Maria Louisa Campbell (1857 - ?)
Thomas W. Campbell (1859-1940)
Elizabeth Catherine ("Lizzie") Campbell (1861-1880)
Margaret Anna Campbell (1863-1865)
and a daughter born 19 April 1867, evidently died young, before baptism

After his first wife died, he married his second wife, Sarah J. Sears, at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church in Zanesville on 1 July 1869 (Fr. Thomas Cady, O.P., officiating). They had no children, and Sarah died within months, of consumption, on 6 November 1869.

He married his third wife, Emma Louisa Wehrheim (his former housekeeper), at the same church on 9 August 1870; they had five children, all born and baptized at St. Thomas' church in Zanesville:

Edward Creighton Campbell (1872-1920)
Mildred Jane Campbell (1874-1950)
Harry Herbert Campbell (1877-?)
Helen Forstee Campbell (1879-?)
Ross Phillip Campbell (1881-?)

Tom's third wife was originally from Baltimore and the Campbell family moved there from Ohio to live with her sister Mary (Mrs. Samuel D. Ross) and her family when Tom's health failed and he could no longer work or support his family on his Civil War disability pension.

They had only been in Baltimore for two months when Tom Campbell died, age 60, at 1038 Light Street, of chronic bronchitis and exhaustion. His death certificate is no. 4654, found in Vol. 9, p. 177, at the Maryland Hall of Records, Annapolis. Cemetery records show that two small children (Lila and Samuel Ross) had been buried previously (1871 and 1885) in his grave, a common practice among the poor (but not necessarily indigent). Tom Campbell was buried 2 December 1887. The grave remained unmarked until a U.S. government veteran's marker was installed by descendants in October 2000.

Two clippings (probably published 3 December 1887) of burial notices (undated, unidentified) probably from the Zanesville and Baltimore papers, found among the family's keepsakes, follow:

Burial of a Union Soldier. --Thomas Campbell, of Company I, 122d Regiment Ohio Volunteers, infantry, and a member of the Hazlett Post, No. 81, G.A.R. of Zanesville, Ohio, was buried yesterday in Baltimore Cemetery from the residence of his brother-in-law, S.D. Ross, No. 113 Light Street. Dodge Post, No. 44, G.A.R. had direction, with the following detailed as pall-bearers: H.B. Lewis, W.T. Kierle, P.W. Daish, John Bowers.

Funeral of an Ohio Veteran
The remains of Thomas Campbell, Sr. of Company I, Twenty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, and a member of Hazlett Post No. 81, G.A.R., of Zanesville, Ohio, were buried yesterday from the residence of his brother-in-law, S.D. Ross, No. 1113 Light street. The interment was under the auspices of Dodge Post, No. 44, G.A.R., the following detail serving as pall-bearers: H.B. Lewis, officer of the day; W.W.T. Kelso, senior vice commander; P.W. Darsh, A.D.C., and John Bowers inspector general.

Son of Robert and Elizabeth (Pollock) Campbell (married 14 November 1826, Parish of St. Mary, Carlisle, Cumberland, England). Until confirmation of Tom's birth or christening is found, alternate birthyears for him are 1826 and 1828, but the 1841 and 1851 English censuses yield an inferred birth year of 1827, and in his diary he claimed his birthday was April 30th. Burial and death records claim he died at age 60, which assertion yields a birth year of 1827. He was a grandson of Thomas Pollock, a weaver of Carlisle, and his wife, Ann Ruxton/Roxton Pollock.

At the age of 14 (1841 census) he was living with his family (including younger siblings Edward, Ann, Elizabeth, Jane, and Susannah) on the north side of Bridge Street in the Caldewgate section of Carlisle, Cumberland county, England, where his father worked as a warehouseman. By the time of the 1851 census, when he was 23, the family had moved to 10 Baxter Street in Hulme, Lancashire, England (today a neighborhood south of the city center of Manchester). There his father worked as a bookeeper, his brother Edward was a warehouseman, and he (Thomas) worked as a grocer.

Their father, Robert Campbell, died the following year (16 December 1852), age 50, of phthisis (tuberculosis), at his home at 37 Ravald Street in the Ancoats section of Manchester. Brother Edward, same address, was the informant for the death certificate. The 1861 and 1871 censuses subsequently show Robert Campbell's widow Elizabeth and her daughters living in Ancoats where the daughters were employed in the local mills.

The details of Tom Campbell's immigration to the United States are as yet unconfirmed. He may well have been the Thomas Campbell who emigrated to New York City from Liverpool on the ship WEST POINT, a 24-year-old clerk who arrived in July 1851. Tom did have an uncle and aunt, George and Mary Ann Pollock, living in Liverpool at that time. What is known is that by 1853 Tom lived in Zanesville, Ohio (where there were also Pollocks). He worked as a druggist in the drugstore of Bennet T. Whitaker and married his first wife, Margaret Smith, on 21 December 1853 (wedding performed and recorded in the Muskingum County marriage register by John Harrison, justice of the peace).

In his thirties, he fought for the Union in the Civil War, enlisting as a Private in the 122nd Regiment of the Ohio Volunteer Infantry, the Union Army's VI Corps, on 26 August 1862. He served as a hospital steward in Company I and kept a diary of his military adventures from 1862 to 1865, including a stint as a prisoner of war. He was mustered out 1 July 1865 at the war's end.

Margaret and Tom had at least six children all born in Zanesville and baptized at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church, including:

Robert Pollock Campbell (1855-1916)
Maria Louisa Campbell (1857 - ?)
Thomas W. Campbell (1859-1940)
Elizabeth Catherine ("Lizzie") Campbell (1861-1880)
Margaret Anna Campbell (1863-1865)
and a daughter born 19 April 1867, evidently died young, before baptism

After his first wife died, he married his second wife, Sarah J. Sears, at St. Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church in Zanesville on 1 July 1869 (Fr. Thomas Cady, O.P., officiating). They had no children, and Sarah died within months, of consumption, on 6 November 1869.

He married his third wife, Emma Louisa Wehrheim (his former housekeeper), at the same church on 9 August 1870; they had five children, all born and baptized at St. Thomas' church in Zanesville:

Edward Creighton Campbell (1872-1920)
Mildred Jane Campbell (1874-1950)
Harry Herbert Campbell (1877-?)
Helen Forstee Campbell (1879-?)
Ross Phillip Campbell (1881-?)

Tom's third wife was originally from Baltimore and the Campbell family moved there from Ohio to live with her sister Mary (Mrs. Samuel D. Ross) and her family when Tom's health failed and he could no longer work or support his family on his Civil War disability pension.

They had only been in Baltimore for two months when Tom Campbell died, age 60, at 1038 Light Street, of chronic bronchitis and exhaustion. His death certificate is no. 4654, found in Vol. 9, p. 177, at the Maryland Hall of Records, Annapolis. Cemetery records show that two small children (Lila and Samuel Ross) had been buried previously (1871 and 1885) in his grave, a common practice among the poor (but not necessarily indigent). Tom Campbell was buried 2 December 1887. The grave remained unmarked until a U.S. government veteran's marker was installed by descendants in October 2000.

Two clippings (probably published 3 December 1887) of burial notices (undated, unidentified) probably from the Zanesville and Baltimore papers, found among the family's keepsakes, follow:

Burial of a Union Soldier. --Thomas Campbell, of Company I, 122d Regiment Ohio Volunteers, infantry, and a member of the Hazlett Post, No. 81, G.A.R. of Zanesville, Ohio, was buried yesterday in Baltimore Cemetery from the residence of his brother-in-law, S.D. Ross, No. 113 Light Street. Dodge Post, No. 44, G.A.R. had direction, with the following detailed as pall-bearers: H.B. Lewis, W.T. Kierle, P.W. Daish, John Bowers.

Funeral of an Ohio Veteran
The remains of Thomas Campbell, Sr. of Company I, Twenty-second Ohio Veteran Volunteer Infantry, and a member of Hazlett Post No. 81, G.A.R., of Zanesville, Ohio, were buried yesterday from the residence of his brother-in-law, S.D. Ross, No. 1113 Light street. The interment was under the auspices of Dodge Post, No. 44, G.A.R., the following detail serving as pall-bearers: H.B. Lewis, officer of the day; W.W.T. Kelso, senior vice commander; P.W. Darsh, A.D.C., and John Bowers inspector general.


Inscription

[U.S. government veteran's upright marble marker installed September 2000:]

Thomas Campbell
Pvt Co I
122 Ohio
Apr 30 1826
Nov 30 1887


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