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 Nadezhda Mandelstam

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Nadezhda Mandelstam Famous memorial

Birth
Saratov, Saratov Oblast, Russia
Death
29 Dec 1980 (aged 81)
Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia
Burial
Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia
Plot
3
Memorial ID
9078741 View Source

Author. She met poet Osip Mandelstam in 1919 and married him three years later. After her husband's arrest and death in 1938 she saved his poetry by committing it all to memory, and saved herself by fleeing to the remote eastern regions of Russia. She was allowed to return to Moscow in 1956 and fought to get Osip's work back into print. In the late 1960's Mandelstam had her two monumental volumes of memoirs (unpublishable in the USSR) smuggled into the west, where they appeared as "Hope Against Hope" (1970) and "Hope Abandoned" (1974); together they offer a unique look at life among the Russian intelligentsia under Stalin and beyond. In her last years she was revered by Russian writers, who made endless pilgrimages to her one-room Moscow apartment, and endured petty harassment (such as denial of postal service and telephone) by Soviet authorities. When she died the KGB confiscated her body to prevent the religious funeral she had requested, but after a wave of protests from Russian artists she was allowed a decent burial.

Author. She met poet Osip Mandelstam in 1919 and married him three years later. After her husband's arrest and death in 1938 she saved his poetry by committing it all to memory, and saved herself by fleeing to the remote eastern regions of Russia. She was allowed to return to Moscow in 1956 and fought to get Osip's work back into print. In the late 1960's Mandelstam had her two monumental volumes of memoirs (unpublishable in the USSR) smuggled into the west, where they appeared as "Hope Against Hope" (1970) and "Hope Abandoned" (1974); together they offer a unique look at life among the Russian intelligentsia under Stalin and beyond. In her last years she was revered by Russian writers, who made endless pilgrimages to her one-room Moscow apartment, and endured petty harassment (such as denial of postal service and telephone) by Soviet authorities. When she died the KGB confiscated her body to prevent the religious funeral she had requested, but after a wave of protests from Russian artists she was allowed a decent burial.

Bio by: Bobb Edwards


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Bobb Edwards
  • Added: 10 Jul 2004
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 9078741
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9078741/nadezhda-mandelstam: accessed ), memorial page for Nadezhda Mandelstam (30 Oct 1899–29 Dec 1980), Find a Grave Memorial ID 9078741, citing Kuntsevskoye Cemetery, Moscow, Moscow Federal City, Russia; Maintained by Find a Grave.