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 Jeremiah Kirkland Smith

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Jeremiah Kirkland Smith

Birth
Smithtown, Suffolk County, New York, USA
Death
8 Aug 1860 (aged 86)
Patchogue, Suffolk County, New York, USA
Burial
Patchogue, Suffolk County, New York, USA
Plot
Section J Lot 1 & 8 Range 4
Memorial ID
90523520 View Source

Son of Zebulon Smith and Deborah Fleet, husband of Elizabeth Terry and father of Gilbert M. Smith.

Husband of Rebecca Gildersleeve and father of Zebulon, Lucius, Thomas W., Charity, Isabel, Israel, Deborah, Charlotte, Philetus, Platt, Sylvester and David C. Smith.

In 1850, Jeremiah Smith, aged 76, could be found living in the home of his daughter Charity, and her husband Edward Mulford, and their children; Walter, Charlotte, Mary, Jane, Jeremiah, Ann and Eveline Smith. Also living in the household was Abial Titus, aged 13.

In 1860, Jeremiah Smith, aged 87, was shown living in the home of his widowed daughter, Deborah (Smith) Biggs, and her children; Calvin J., Jeremiah S., Monroe L. and Isabella B. Biggs. Also in the household was his son, David Smith, aged 38.

"The following account of Jeremiah Smith (called Uncle Jerry) of South Beach, L.I. notoriety and fame, is received from E. S. Mulford, grandson, Patchogue.

Jeremiah Smith, was born in Suffolk county L.I. New York Sept. 15, 177 3. His occupation in early life was a farmer in Dix Hills and Clay Pits, Huntington, from thence went to Islip as a “Club house” Keeper and thence to Fire Island opposite and south of east Island, as Public House Keeper and watering place, and from thence to Patchogue L.I. where he died Aug. 8, 1860. He was a kind, affable man. His father’s name was Zebulon Smith a farmer in Huntington Township on the north side of L.I. and English decent, (note: Seversmith in his “Colonial Families of America” names Nicholas Seversmith b. 1635 in Netherlands the progenitor of this family through his son Samuel Smith). Jeremiah Smith was married twice and had a large family of children thirteen in number, as follows. His first wife was Miss Elizabeth Terry of Islip, by whom he had one son Gilbert M. born Feby. 5, 1796. His second wife was Miss Rebecca Gildersleeve by whom he had twelve children, born and named as follows.

The House of (Uncle Jerry) in the Beach at Fire Island , though simple in it’s construction, and not containing room enough for an outside cook-room, to a modern Hotel, was in the backward of time of seventy years ago. As famous on, many accounts as any of the stately Hotel edifices, with magnificent appointments, of modern times. In “Sketches of a Life on Fire Island” long since published Uncle Jerry, was the hero of its tales. He was always ready to assist in cases of Shipwreck, and wreck masters as well as all others, had the utmost confidence in his honesty in the saving of property from wrecked Vessels, and his courage and daring in saving the lives of those on board ship wrecked vessels driven on the shore of this dangerous coast, in the storms at inclement seasons of the year. He was a great and skillful fisherman, and not wanting in the power of expressing his thoughts in conversation, and on this account his ho use was the resort for fishers and gunners who were delighted with his stories of practical life on the Beach, as well as his occasional legendary lore.

The writer has some pleasant memories of Jeremiah Smith and his home for sojourners on the Beach. When he was a boy about sixty-five years ago, his father sent him, in charge of a friendly attendant, to the house Jeremiah smith at Fire Islands, that he might receive the benefits of frequent sea bathing in the Ocean, which had been prescribed by a physician as a remedy for a certain malady with which he was then afflicted. He stayed at the house of Jeremiah Smith for more than a week, and he remembers his stories about certain strange fish which he had then lately caught, calling them “mermaid, mermaids trumpets”. And he also remembers the manner in which the numerous guests at the house, himself among the numbers, took their repose during the nights. Blankets were spread upon the floors and on such common floor beds, all the guests, Gentlemen, fisherman, gunners, horse crab (or horsefoot) catchers, in promiscuous confusion, sought repose."

(Long Island Surnames; 1850 and 1860 US Federal Census; Seversmith, Herbert Furman: Colonial Families....has Nicholas Seversmith (Mary Tibbals), father of Samuel Smith (Mary Cory), grandfather of Isaac Smith (Sarah Titus) and great grandfather of Zebulon Smith Bap. 23 Sep 1741 Huntington, LI, NY. Died 20 Dec 1807. Married 8 Nov 17 63 Deborah Fleet daughter of Parrott Fleet and Abigail Wood Fleet.)

Son of Zebulon Smith and Deborah Fleet, husband of Elizabeth Terry and father of Gilbert M. Smith.

Husband of Rebecca Gildersleeve and father of Zebulon, Lucius, Thomas W., Charity, Isabel, Israel, Deborah, Charlotte, Philetus, Platt, Sylvester and David C. Smith.

In 1850, Jeremiah Smith, aged 76, could be found living in the home of his daughter Charity, and her husband Edward Mulford, and their children; Walter, Charlotte, Mary, Jane, Jeremiah, Ann and Eveline Smith. Also living in the household was Abial Titus, aged 13.

In 1860, Jeremiah Smith, aged 87, was shown living in the home of his widowed daughter, Deborah (Smith) Biggs, and her children; Calvin J., Jeremiah S., Monroe L. and Isabella B. Biggs. Also in the household was his son, David Smith, aged 38.

"The following account of Jeremiah Smith (called Uncle Jerry) of South Beach, L.I. notoriety and fame, is received from E. S. Mulford, grandson, Patchogue.

Jeremiah Smith, was born in Suffolk county L.I. New York Sept. 15, 177 3. His occupation in early life was a farmer in Dix Hills and Clay Pits, Huntington, from thence went to Islip as a “Club house” Keeper and thence to Fire Island opposite and south of east Island, as Public House Keeper and watering place, and from thence to Patchogue L.I. where he died Aug. 8, 1860. He was a kind, affable man. His father’s name was Zebulon Smith a farmer in Huntington Township on the north side of L.I. and English decent, (note: Seversmith in his “Colonial Families of America” names Nicholas Seversmith b. 1635 in Netherlands the progenitor of this family through his son Samuel Smith). Jeremiah Smith was married twice and had a large family of children thirteen in number, as follows. His first wife was Miss Elizabeth Terry of Islip, by whom he had one son Gilbert M. born Feby. 5, 1796. His second wife was Miss Rebecca Gildersleeve by whom he had twelve children, born and named as follows.

The House of (Uncle Jerry) in the Beach at Fire Island , though simple in it’s construction, and not containing room enough for an outside cook-room, to a modern Hotel, was in the backward of time of seventy years ago. As famous on, many accounts as any of the stately Hotel edifices, with magnificent appointments, of modern times. In “Sketches of a Life on Fire Island” long since published Uncle Jerry, was the hero of its tales. He was always ready to assist in cases of Shipwreck, and wreck masters as well as all others, had the utmost confidence in his honesty in the saving of property from wrecked Vessels, and his courage and daring in saving the lives of those on board ship wrecked vessels driven on the shore of this dangerous coast, in the storms at inclement seasons of the year. He was a great and skillful fisherman, and not wanting in the power of expressing his thoughts in conversation, and on this account his ho use was the resort for fishers and gunners who were delighted with his stories of practical life on the Beach, as well as his occasional legendary lore.

The writer has some pleasant memories of Jeremiah Smith and his home for sojourners on the Beach. When he was a boy about sixty-five years ago, his father sent him, in charge of a friendly attendant, to the house Jeremiah smith at Fire Islands, that he might receive the benefits of frequent sea bathing in the Ocean, which had been prescribed by a physician as a remedy for a certain malady with which he was then afflicted. He stayed at the house of Jeremiah Smith for more than a week, and he remembers his stories about certain strange fish which he had then lately caught, calling them “mermaid, mermaids trumpets”. And he also remembers the manner in which the numerous guests at the house, himself among the numbers, took their repose during the nights. Blankets were spread upon the floors and on such common floor beds, all the guests, Gentlemen, fisherman, gunners, horse crab (or horsefoot) catchers, in promiscuous confusion, sought repose."

(Long Island Surnames; 1850 and 1860 US Federal Census; Seversmith, Herbert Furman: Colonial Families....has Nicholas Seversmith (Mary Tibbals), father of Samuel Smith (Mary Cory), grandfather of Isaac Smith (Sarah Titus) and great grandfather of Zebulon Smith Bap. 23 Sep 1741 Huntington, LI, NY. Died 20 Dec 1807. Married 8 Nov 17 63 Deborah Fleet daughter of Parrott Fleet and Abigail Wood Fleet.)

Gravesite Details

Plot owner John J. and William Craven.


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