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 Lizette Woodworth Reese

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Lizette Woodworth Reese Famous memorial

Birth
Waverly, Baltimore City, Maryland, USA
Death
17 Dec 1935 (aged 79)
Baltimore, Baltimore City, Maryland, USA
Burial
Baltimore City, Maryland, USA
Memorial ID
9034658 View Source

Poet. She was an American poet, publishing her works in the late 19th century going into the 20th century. Mainly, her poems were about her rural life as a child, giving a fresh image of the beauty of nature. She was often compared to author Emily Dickinson. In 1931 she was named as the poet laureate of Maryland. Born one of the twin daughters of a Confederate soldier and his German wife, she was educated in private schools before beginning a 50-year career as a school teacher, which included for a time being assigned to a segregated colored school. She taught for 21 of those years at Western High School in Baltimore. According to the biography from the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame, her first poem, “The Abandoned House” was published in 1874 by “Southern Magazine,” and three years later, 33 poems appeared in her first book, “A Branch of May.” Other collections of poems soon followed: “A Handful of Lavender” in 1891 and “Pastures and Other Poems” in 1933, with a total of nine collections of poems and two long narrative poems. Considered non-fiction, her autobiographical “Victorian Village” was published in 1929 and “The York Road” in 1931. After she died, some of her poems were collected and published posthumously along with the novel “Worleys” in 1936. Of all the poems that she has written, "Tears" is her best-known piece and was published in “Scribner’s” magazine and widely anthologized. Although her twin sister married, she never married and stayed in the family’s home. In 1890 she was one of the ladies who founded the Women’s Literary Club of Baltimore, remaining active with this group for years. Being supported by critics, she toured the Northeastern United States promoting her books and encouraging women to be active in the literary world. She was inducted in the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame in 2016; received an honorary doctorate degree from Goucher College, a private liberal art college in Maryland; and from 1922, she was the honorary president of the Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore. There have been three biographies written about her.

Poet. She was an American poet, publishing her works in the late 19th century going into the 20th century. Mainly, her poems were about her rural life as a child, giving a fresh image of the beauty of nature. She was often compared to author Emily Dickinson. In 1931 she was named as the poet laureate of Maryland. Born one of the twin daughters of a Confederate soldier and his German wife, she was educated in private schools before beginning a 50-year career as a school teacher, which included for a time being assigned to a segregated colored school. She taught for 21 of those years at Western High School in Baltimore. According to the biography from the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame, her first poem, “The Abandoned House” was published in 1874 by “Southern Magazine,” and three years later, 33 poems appeared in her first book, “A Branch of May.” Other collections of poems soon followed: “A Handful of Lavender” in 1891 and “Pastures and Other Poems” in 1933, with a total of nine collections of poems and two long narrative poems. Considered non-fiction, her autobiographical “Victorian Village” was published in 1929 and “The York Road” in 1931. After she died, some of her poems were collected and published posthumously along with the novel “Worleys” in 1936. Of all the poems that she has written, "Tears" is her best-known piece and was published in “Scribner’s” magazine and widely anthologized. Although her twin sister married, she never married and stayed in the family’s home. In 1890 she was one of the ladies who founded the Women’s Literary Club of Baltimore, remaining active with this group for years. Being supported by critics, she toured the Northeastern United States promoting her books and encouraging women to be active in the literary world. She was inducted in the Maryland Women’s Hall of Fame in 2016; received an honorary doctorate degree from Goucher College, a private liberal art college in Maryland; and from 1922, she was the honorary president of the Edgar Allan Poe Society of Baltimore. There have been three biographies written about her.

Bio by: Linda Davis


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"I will sing unto the Lord a new song."


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Laurie
  • Added: 3 Jul 2004
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 9034658
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/9034658/lizette-woodworth-reese: accessed ), memorial page for Lizette Woodworth Reese (9 Jan 1856–17 Dec 1935), Find a Grave Memorial ID 9034658, citing Saint Johns Episcopal Cemetery, Baltimore City, Maryland, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave .