The Photo Request has been fulfilled.

 
 Ole Jensen

Ole Jensen

Birth
Langtjarn, Sunne kommun, Värmlands län, Sweden
Death 28 Aug 1876 (aged 52)
Richfield, Sevier County, Utah, USA
Burial Richfield, Sevier County, Utah, USA
Plot A.09.02.02
Memorial ID 89346 · View Source
Suggest Edits

My grandfather, Ole Jensen, was born March 4, 1824 at Grasmark, Vesmlan Sweden. My grandmother was born June 23, 1829 at Vernland, Sweden. Grandmother learned how to spin, weave, and knit when she was a young girl. These arts came in very handy in later years. Grandfather and Grandmother were married about 1857; they moved to Denmark a short time later. On the 30th of September 1858 a baby girl arrived. She was christened Alvina Jensen. Grandmother and Grandfather were converted to the church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints by Mormon Elders. After their conversion, they were very desirous of coming to Zion where they could worship God and live their religion as had been taught them by the Elders. All plans were made, and in April 1859 they bade their friends and loved ones goodbye. In a company with other Saints, they left their native land; their destination being Utah. They arrived at Liverpool by boat where they took passage on a ship to America. May of the Saints became ill during their journey, and the Elders held meetings and administered to them. After a trip of nine weeks, they arrived in New York, and from there continued by rail to Florence where they were assigned to a handcart company headed by Captain George Rowley. They handcart was loaded with cooking utensils, bedding, and food for their arduous trek across the countless miles of desert and plains. They left Florence June 9, 1859 with a company of 235 people, six wagons, and 60 handcarts. Grandfather pulled the handcart while Grandmother walked and carried her baby girl in her arms. September 4, 1859, they arrived in Salt Lake City, and made their residence at Grantsville for six years. December 14, 1860 a second baby girl was born and given the name of Amanda. Two years later another baby girl was born, bu her stay was very short. She died and was buried at Grantsville, Utah. The tiny casket was taken to the burial grounds by the only buggy which the town possessed while Grandfather and Grandmother walked arm in arm behind and their friends followed on foot. Another incident of which my Grandmother often spoke was of Grandfather standing guard over an Indian prisoner in the little meeting house at Grantsville. About 1865 they moved to Fountain Green, Utah by way of ox-team. The team consisted of one ox and the family cow. In Fountain Green they came into possession of two city lots. On one lot was built a two-room log house and on the other wheat was planted. This little wheat crop was protected from grasshoppers throughout the summer by Alvina and Amanda. Their weapon being a cloth tied around a stick. With this they went back and forth across the wheat field shooing the grasshoppers into a nearby pasture. Enough wheat was saved to make flour for the following winter. Grandmother often told us of the terrible experiences of real fright for Indian troubles. The citizens were often forced, when Indian tribes were threatening, to gather at a small fort in the center of town. It was built of a series of log room placed one against the other to form a wall and encircled a small area. The signal for gathering was a few beats on a big drum. At the sound of the drum, terror possessed everyone especially the children. On one occasion the Indians attacked three young men, who were herding the cows and horses of the townspeople. One, Lewis Lund, was killed having been shot through the head. Another was injured, being shot through the ankle. But the third one, in some miraculous way, escaped on his horse and raced to town to give the alarm. A dozen or more men went to try to repossess the herd which was being driven toward the hills by the Indians. The cows were recovered but the horses could not be overtaken. At the same time, other citizens were carrying the body of their friend back to town where everything was in a fearful state of excitement. People gathered at the fort. Many were hysterical with fright and grief as the young man's body was carried into the fort. The sight of the dad man was imprinted on the memory of the children also. A baby boy made his appearance at their home. He was given the name of Amel. They lived at Fountain Green for three years, during which time Grandfather engaged in helping the stranded citizens who were driven out of Richfield by the Indians. Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Jensen, father and mother of Mary Jensen Bean, and a family by the name of Clauson lived with Grandfather and Grandmother in their two room house until they could make a home for their families. While the house room was small, the east room was large. About 1869 they moved to Oak City where Grandfather tried to carry on ranch-life. This proved unsatisfactory, however, since they had only a few head of cattle. About 1871, they moved to Richfield where they lived in a small adobe house belonging to Mr. Fisher. It was located on the lot where E. W. Thurber lived. Their family cow was kept at the public corral, and it was Alvina's job to milk the cow. The times were very trying at this time. I remember when Grandmother took her rings from her fingers and sold them for 3 lbs of flour in order to keep her family from starving. Often Grandfather helped to bury some of the unfortunates who could not resist the hardships of those early days. Alvina and Amanda were called by H.P. Miller as Sunday School teachers in 1871. In 1874 Alvina married Amos Knute Nielson. Amanda married George Baker. Both girls lived in Richfield. Amel was called on a mission, and when he returned, he too, married and made a home of his own. About 1875 Grandfather died leaving a wife and family to mourn his passing. He was buried in the old cemetery, however, his body was later transferred to the new cemetery. Grandmother lived with Mother (Alvina) for a while. Later she moved to the old home with Amel and his wife. This is where she passed away. She was loved by all who knew her. She and her husband are sleeping side by side in the cemetery. Just a note of sweet remembrance, Just a memory fond and true, Just a token of Lord's devotion, That our hearts still long for you. Tho' your years of life were numbered, When a messenger whispered low, "The Master signals a call for thee" You answered, "I am ready to go." By Effie Dunn


Family Members


Advertisement

Advertisement

Advertisement

  • Maintained by: Marchelle Nielson
  • Originally Created by: Utah State Historical Society
  • Added: 2 Feb 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 89346
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Ole Jensen (3 Mar 1824–28 Aug 1876), Find A Grave Memorial no. 89346, citing Richfield City Cemetery, Richfield, Sevier County, Utah, USA ; Maintained by Marchelle Nielson (contributor 47199033) .