Advertisement

Norman Rockwell

Advertisement

Norman Rockwell Famous memorial Veteran

Birth
Manhattan, New York County, New York, USA
Death
8 Nov 1978 (aged 84)
Stockbridge, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA
Burial
Stockbridge, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA GPS-Latitude: 42.2864656, Longitude: -73.3197148
Memorial ID
View Source
Painter. He is recognized as a prolific 20th-century American painter and illustrator, who captured the American way of life, touching on current events and simple values. Most known as an oil-on-canvas painter, he produced over 4,000 paintings yet was a book illustrator of more than forty books. Born in New York City, he desired to be an artist from a very young age. At age 14, he enrolled in the Chase School of Art, which later became the New York School of Art. In 1910, he left to study art at the National Academy of Design and later transferred to the Art Students League, where he studied with famed artists Thomas Fogarty and George Bridgman. He found success early, painting his first commissioned pieces before his 16th birthday. As a teenager, he was hired as the Art Director for "Boy's Life," the official publication of the Boy Scouts of America. He remained in this relationship for 64 years. He lived in a house at 24 Lord Kitchener Road in the Bonnie Crest neighborhood of New Rochelle, New York, where he set up a studio and produced artwork for various magazines. Norman Rockwell was also a member of Bonnie Briar Country Club in nearby Larchmont. In 1916, he sold his first painting to "The Saturday Evening Post" magazine, starting a 47-year relationship. When he moved his family to Arlington, Vermont, his paintings began to reflect small-town America. In 1943, inspired by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech, he painted the series called the "Four Freedoms," which is considered by many to be his finest work. During World War II, he captured war-inspired events in paintings such as "Rosie Riveter" in July of 1943, "Willie Gillies: Package From Home" in 1941, and "Disabled Veteran" in 1944. With his unique sense of humor, his style included painting himself into any large crowd scenes and a 1960 self-portrait of him painting himself. In 1953, he moved his family to Stockbridge, Massachusetts. After 322 magazine covers, he ended his 47-year stretch with the "Saturday Evening Post" in 1962, moving to "Look" magazine, for whom he worked the next 10 years. During the 1960s, he painted a series of magazine covers documenting the Civil Rights era. In 1973, he established a trust to preserve his artistic legacy with the Stockbridge Historical Society, which founded the Norman Rockwell Museum. In 1977, in failing health, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor for an American citizen. He married three times: His first marriage was to his model, Irene O'Connor, and the 14-year marriage ended in divorce in 1930; the second was to a school teacher, Mary Barstow, and the couple had three sons; and as a widower, he married a retired teacher, Mary Punderson.
Painter. He is recognized as a prolific 20th-century American painter and illustrator, who captured the American way of life, touching on current events and simple values. Most known as an oil-on-canvas painter, he produced over 4,000 paintings yet was a book illustrator of more than forty books. Born in New York City, he desired to be an artist from a very young age. At age 14, he enrolled in the Chase School of Art, which later became the New York School of Art. In 1910, he left to study art at the National Academy of Design and later transferred to the Art Students League, where he studied with famed artists Thomas Fogarty and George Bridgman. He found success early, painting his first commissioned pieces before his 16th birthday. As a teenager, he was hired as the Art Director for "Boy's Life," the official publication of the Boy Scouts of America. He remained in this relationship for 64 years. He lived in a house at 24 Lord Kitchener Road in the Bonnie Crest neighborhood of New Rochelle, New York, where he set up a studio and produced artwork for various magazines. Norman Rockwell was also a member of Bonnie Briar Country Club in nearby Larchmont. In 1916, he sold his first painting to "The Saturday Evening Post" magazine, starting a 47-year relationship. When he moved his family to Arlington, Vermont, his paintings began to reflect small-town America. In 1943, inspired by President Franklin D. Roosevelt's speech, he painted the series called the "Four Freedoms," which is considered by many to be his finest work. During World War II, he captured war-inspired events in paintings such as "Rosie Riveter" in July of 1943, "Willie Gillies: Package From Home" in 1941, and "Disabled Veteran" in 1944. With his unique sense of humor, his style included painting himself into any large crowd scenes and a 1960 self-portrait of him painting himself. In 1953, he moved his family to Stockbridge, Massachusetts. After 322 magazine covers, he ended his 47-year stretch with the "Saturday Evening Post" in 1962, moving to "Look" magazine, for whom he worked the next 10 years. During the 1960s, he painted a series of magazine covers documenting the Civil Rights era. In 1973, he established a trust to preserve his artistic legacy with the Stockbridge Historical Society, which founded the Norman Rockwell Museum. In 1977, in failing health, he was awarded the Presidential Medal of Freedom, the highest civilian honor for an American citizen. He married three times: His first marriage was to his model, Irene O'Connor, and the 14-year marriage ended in divorce in 1930; the second was to a school teacher, Mary Barstow, and the couple had three sons; and as a widower, he married a retired teacher, Mary Punderson.

Bio by: Kit and Morgan Benson



Advertisement

Advertisement

How famous was Norman Rockwell ?

Current rating: 4.78016 out of 5 stars

373 votes

Sign-in to cast your vote.

  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Added: Apr 25, 1998
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/888/norman-rockwell: accessed ), memorial page for Norman Rockwell (3 Feb 1894–8 Nov 1978), Find a Grave Memorial ID 888, citing Stockbridge Cemetery, Stockbridge, Berkshire County, Massachusetts, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.