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 Harold Swensen Walker

Harold Swensen Walker

Birth
Lindon, Utah County, Utah, USA
Death 2 May 1976 (aged 82)
Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Utah, USA
Burial Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Utah, USA
Plot B-37-018-04
Memorial ID 86971 · View Source
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Harold was the son of Annie Swenson and Ezra Walker.

On September 10, 1919, he married Lucille Harvey in Salt Lake City, Utah.


I was a "September morn" kid. Sister Culmer came to help mother with me on the morning of Sept 18, 1893, I being the oldest son pf Ezra Foutz and Annie Swenson Walker. Our home was old soft-rock house that Father built from rocks taken from the old fort wall which ran along the north side of Grandfather Henson Walker's barn.
I was not what one would call a happy, contended child that first year. I cried and complained most of the time, althought I grew fat and healthy. As I grew older, mother amused me by letting me sit on the table, tie strings on chairs, drive four play horses, or play with our old dog, Bounce. I always seemed to have a broken leg if I was sent on an errand, like getting the pig's feed bucket. When I was six, I started in the chart class at the old south school in Lindon. I played traunt the second day, so Mother kept me home that year until I was seven. Later, the school moved to a new building on Lindon Hill. Here I attended 'til the sixth grade. When I graduated from the eighth grade I gave one of the addresses, as I was next to the valedictorian of the class. At high school I did mostly athletics--won a silver medal at BUY relay carnival, besides numerous pennants and ribbons. Also I played on the basketball team that won three Utah County championships. After graduating with the third graduating class in 1924, I attended BUY at Provo. I was active in the LDS church and did many church activities. Soon after the LDS church adopted the scout program, I began to lead a group of boys. In my scout activities I held almost every position that couold be held by a volunteer. I was awared an Eagle badge, Scoutmaster's Key, Arrowhead, and Silver Beaver, the highest award given by men by a local council for special service to boys. Now I have thirty years of service in scouting.
In the summer of 1915 I was called to go on a mission to the netherlands. I was thrilled and began making prepartions. Then in the Fall I received word that war conditions in Europe were such that no more missionaries were being sent overseas, and that I would fill a mission to the Eastern States. I spent most of two years in Vermont. Upon my return home, I was inducted into the Army Nov 8, 1918, and the Armistice was signed Nov. 11, 1918. I received my honorable dischagre Dec. 9, 1918.
Early in my life, while I was still a young man, Lucile Marie Harvey came to our house to visit my sister, Amee. She stayed two or three days and I was permitted to take her home at the end of her visit. When school started that fall I was found at her side carrying her books home for her. I took her with me on the basketball trips, when we were permitted to take girls. She was my sweetheart when we played in hte high school drama. We saw a lot of each other until I went on my mission. In fact, it was understood that we would be married, yet we had not made any formal announcement. Love by correspondence was not easy for us.
After being released to come home at the end of my mission I took a full month, making the trip, not withstanding the draft board was waiting for me and the 1918 flu epidemic was raging in every city in the nation.
The Sunday following my arrival home, I went down to Headquist Drug Store to get some hipo to develop some pictures. While making this purchase, Lucile came in the drug store and imeediately left. I can't now recall what happened to the kodak developer, but it is important that I followed the young lady and overtook her nad before I went home that morning we had patched up all our differences and we were able to begin where we left off. The spring and summer that followed the close of the war were a happy time, while we made our preparations to be married. I worked hard on a farm and spent almost every evening with her until I weighed only 150 pounds. We were married Sept. 10, 1919 in the Salt Lake City Temple. There were near 70 couples to be married in this temple session, which lasted from 7 a.m. to well after 5 p.m. The couples were called alphabetically so we came near the last. This was a trying day for Lucile, she was upset by the sudden death of little nephew, the oldest son of her sister. The little fellow died of meningitis two days before we had planned to be married. We honeymooned that night at the Hotel Newhouse and returned home the next Monday to attend the funeral of our little nephew.
They lived in his father's house. This year I was elected president of the Lindon-Orem Dairy Assoc., a position I held until I moved from Lindon. They have 3 children.
In MArch 1925, his father sold the farm and we moved back to Pleasant Grove. I attended the Spring Quarter at BYU, taking training to be a teacher. I got a job at the Farmer's Exchange, a feed and produce business, where they soon made me assistance manager. When Fall came I continued on there and never did teach school. From the Farmer's Exchange I went to work for Dixon Taylor Russell Co., and after going to Lehi where the company was to open a store but did not because of the feeling between the uptown and downtown people, I was called to Provo where I worked in the main store until June 1929. I then became manager of the Pleasant Grove store. When Sperry Flour Co., came and offered me a position as saleman for Central and Eastern Utah, I went with them. This work I followed until the General Mills closed out the Sperry Feed Co., and all the saleman in this area were laid off. I worked for Pleasant Grove Canning Company until 1940. One morning Mayor West called me and asked if I would like to be the city marshall, which position I accepted and held until I became the Chief Police of Pleasant Grove City. One's education could not be complete unless he has been a law enforcement officer. I also served two terms on the city council, both during the depression. In 1950 I was appointed director of civil defense in the community by Mayor Marrott and our city won the distrinction of being one of the best prepared cities in the country. I served two years as director of civil defense for Utah County.
Much of this time I was supervisor to the Primary in the stake and for years I was the chairman of the stake Aaronic Priesthood Committee. On Sunday Feb 2,1947, the Stake Presidency called the members of the new ward together and I was sustained bishop, with Brother Warnick and Brother Armistead as my counselors. The ward was called Grove Ward. On Wed. Fe.5, 1947 I was ordained a bishop by Spencer W. Kimball of the Quorm of Twelve. I was released on Nov. 26, 1950. During my adjusting period, I taught Sunday School and MIA and did ward teaching. Lucile was the Gleaner leader and I led the M-Men. We made a good team it seemed. While one receives blessings from our Heavenly Father for doing his work well, I was again called and awarded the highest award that the MIA gives to leaders of young men in the Church. I was presented with an Honorary Master M Man award on Mar 1954 and the year following, Lucile was awarded the Honorary Golden Gleaner Ward.
I had never really given up the interest I had formed while I was bishop in the men of our Church who still held the Aaronice Preisthood. Lucile and I were set apart for a mission to these fine people. It took us some time to get the thing worked out, but we have followed this work with great interest, not to say much joy and satisfaction, we were taking stock of this work in the ten years just passed. We have helped with the convenersion of four converts, and have helped twenty-five men from the Aaronice Priesthood to become Elders. Many of these men are not only active, but are leaders in our stake today.
He passed away, 2 May 1976, Pleasant Grove, UT.




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  • Maintained by: SRBentz
  • Originally Created by: Utah State Historical Society
  • Added: 2 Feb 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 86971
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Harold Swensen Walker (18 Sep 1893–2 May 1976), Find A Grave Memorial no. 86971, citing Pleasant Grove City Cemetery, Pleasant Grove, Utah County, Utah, USA ; Maintained by SRBentz (contributor 47051679) .