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 Helen Beverley

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Helen Beverley Famous memorial

Original Name
Helen Smuckler
Birth
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, USA
Death
15 Jul 2011 (aged 94)
Woodland Hills, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Burial
Culver City, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Plot
Acacia Gardens, Wall II, Crypt 612
Memorial ID
86696212 View Source

Actress. She is best remembered for her portrayal of the compassionate Wanda Mirova in "Overture to Glory" (1940). Born Helen Smuckler, she was raised in a traditional working-class family, the daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants. After beginning her career as a leading lady in stock companies, particularly Yiddish theatre, she was discovered by director Peretz Hirshbein while attending a social function at the Musuem of Natural History. Impressed by her dark good looks, slim physique, and articulate voice, he took notice of her potential and arranged for her to begin a career in the film industry beginning with her appearing under his supervision per a supporting role in "Green Fields" (1937). From there, she would go on to flourish as a notable character actress appearing in over 11 features; often typecast as wives, mothers, faithful friends, white-collared workers, nurses, secretaries, clergywomen, educators, housekeepers, and aristocrats. She appeared in such feature films as "The Light Ahead" (1939), "Black Magic" (1944), "The Master Race" (1944), "Stairway for a Star" (1947), "Playgirl" (1954), "The Shrike" (1955), and "Ada" (1961). On television, she appeared in numerous guest spots on such syndicated sitcoms as "The Rifleman" and "Marcus Welby, M.D." During her career, she was an honorary member of Actors Equity, was a member of the Screen Actors Guild, was supportive of the Motion Picture and Television Fund, had been a member of the Hollywood Democratic Committee, was a regular parishioner of the Temple Israel of Hollywood, presided as a chairwoman for her local charters of the American Red Cross and Save the Children, had been a theatrical instructor for the Pasadena Playhouse, was one of the founding members of the Canyon Theatre Guild, had been a commercial model for the Forbes Agency, and she was married to actor Lee J. Cobb from 1940 to 1952 (their union ended in divorce and produced two children, one of whom became actress Julie Cobb). Upon her 1975 retirement, she spent the remainder of her life being a generous benefactor for several public schools and state parks, and was involved in charitable and religious causes, until her death.

Actress. She is best remembered for her portrayal of the compassionate Wanda Mirova in "Overture to Glory" (1940). Born Helen Smuckler, she was raised in a traditional working-class family, the daughter of Russian Jewish immigrants. After beginning her career as a leading lady in stock companies, particularly Yiddish theatre, she was discovered by director Peretz Hirshbein while attending a social function at the Musuem of Natural History. Impressed by her dark good looks, slim physique, and articulate voice, he took notice of her potential and arranged for her to begin a career in the film industry beginning with her appearing under his supervision per a supporting role in "Green Fields" (1937). From there, she would go on to flourish as a notable character actress appearing in over 11 features; often typecast as wives, mothers, faithful friends, white-collared workers, nurses, secretaries, clergywomen, educators, housekeepers, and aristocrats. She appeared in such feature films as "The Light Ahead" (1939), "Black Magic" (1944), "The Master Race" (1944), "Stairway for a Star" (1947), "Playgirl" (1954), "The Shrike" (1955), and "Ada" (1961). On television, she appeared in numerous guest spots on such syndicated sitcoms as "The Rifleman" and "Marcus Welby, M.D." During her career, she was an honorary member of Actors Equity, was a member of the Screen Actors Guild, was supportive of the Motion Picture and Television Fund, had been a member of the Hollywood Democratic Committee, was a regular parishioner of the Temple Israel of Hollywood, presided as a chairwoman for her local charters of the American Red Cross and Save the Children, had been a theatrical instructor for the Pasadena Playhouse, was one of the founding members of the Canyon Theatre Guild, had been a commercial model for the Forbes Agency, and she was married to actor Lee J. Cobb from 1940 to 1952 (their union ended in divorce and produced two children, one of whom became actress Julie Cobb). Upon her 1975 retirement, she spent the remainder of her life being a generous benefactor for several public schools and state parks, and was involved in charitable and religious causes, until her death.

Bio by: Lowell Thurgood


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