Arthur George “Art” Waidelich

Arthur George “Art” Waidelich

Birth
Lafayette, Tippecanoe County, Indiana, USA
Death 5 Oct 1936 (aged 45)
Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Burial Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Plot Whispering Pines Map 3 Lot 1968 Space 3
Memorial ID 86688962 · View Source
Suggest Edits

FROM: Alexander Hamilton High School Yearbook, 1937, Page 90:
IN MEMORIAM
Two qualities contributed largely to Mr. Waidelich's success: a practical imagination which readily pictured the problem, visioned the difficulties and forecast the solutions a spirit of youth quite at home with young minds and unfailing in its sympathy with young hearts. Not soon will Mr. Waide1ich's place be filled.
-- SUSAN M. DORSEY Superintendent of Schools 1920-1929

The sudden passing of Arthur G. Waidelich was a severe blow to the school system of our city and in particular to the students and patrons of Alexander Hamilton High School, who in a short time had learned to respect and admire him for his intense devotion to the cause of youth and humanity, which he had served so well for many years.
-- A FRANK A. BOUELLE Superintendent of Schools 1929

To date he was my closest associate in the work of developing Frank Wiggins Trade School. Side by side we studied the problems that came in pioneering a new enterprise. Through such a relationship I gained from him continual inspiration and encouragement. He was courageous, and possessed the sound and growing philosophy of education, and vision which enabled him to build for the future. He was so human, and possessed such a fine spirit of good sportsmanship, that Working with him was a rare privilege.
-- HOWARD A. CAMPION Assistant Superintendent of Schools, Principal of Frank Wiggins Trade School 1925-1934

The two outstanding interests of Mr. Waidelich were his home and his profession. To these he devoted his entire time and strength. His life, fully absorbed in them, was successfully complete.
-- ARTHUR GOULD Deputy Superintendent of Schools
###

FROM: Alexander Hamilton High School Yearbook, 1937, Page 91:
ARTHUR GEORGE WAIDELICH 1890-1936
At noonday in the bustle of man's work-time Greet the unseen with a cheer! Bid him forward, breast and back as either should he, "Strive and thrive", cry: "Speed,-fight on, for ever There as here." -Browning
Courage and action were the keynotes of Mr. Waidelich's character. Those things which others dream of accomplishing when times or circumstances are favorable, he started to work upon, creating the situation in which he thought they could function. As a consequence, his plans were usually in operation while others were still talking about how it might be done. He possessed that rare combination which seems necessary in a leader: he was a dreamer of dreams regarding the purposes which he hoped to accomplishing he was a practical man of action in giving these visions reality. Difficulties did not deter him, but rather stimulated him to greater effort. A favorite comment of his was, "l am not interested in how it can't be done, but in how it can be done.' Throughout his life he had combined theory and practice, studiousness and activity. While still in college he was at the same time having the experience of teaching. After some years in the school room, during his studies at the University of Chicago, he was concerned with some of the educational frontiers of that day. His work during the World War as an officer in the United States Army was in the field of educational rehabilitation, as was his work after the close of the war with the Veterans' Welfare Bureau of the Southern California District, which he directed from 1920 to 1925. He won his reputation in the Los Angeles City Schools by his success as a pioneer in trade education in this part of the country with the establishment of Frank Wiggins Trade School. As its vice principal, he not only supervised curriculum, trade contacts, and personnel work, but he directed a series of vocational studies which were printed and sponsored jointly by the Los Angeles Board of Education and the California State Department of Public Instruction. His call to return to the field of secondary education came unexpectedly in the fall of 1932, when he was sent to Torrance High School. He found his greatest compensation there in working with young people of high school age, and he came to feel that this was the most challenging field of modern education, the one deserving the best time and thought of educators. Up to the moment of his untimely death he was engaged in the study of this problem with a group of outstanding educators of California, who were working for the doctorate at the University of Southern California. At the same time he was applying the principles of progressive education in Alexander Hamilton High School, whose head he had been since September, 1935. ln the stricken faces of the students whose grief was epitomized by one of their number in this line of her poem, "but Hamilton hearts are sore bereft," in the stunned silence of his associates, but best of all in the will to carry on in the direction toward which he had pointed, was found his sincerest tribute. "lt is rather for us the living to pledge ourselves to the unfinished Work," and thus to share in his immortality.
HARRIET C. ROBBINS M of Vi k of
###


Family Members

Spouse
Children

Sponsored by Ancestry

Advertisement

Plan a visit to Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale)?

Advertisement

Advertisement

  • Maintained by: Robin Agarwal
  • Originally Created by: Chris Mills
  • Added: 12 Mar 2012
  • Find A Grave Memorial 86688962
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Arthur George “Art” Waidelich (16 Dec 1890–5 Oct 1936), Find A Grave Memorial no. 86688962, citing Forest Lawn Memorial Park (Glendale), Glendale, Los Angeles County, California, USA ; Maintained by Robin Agarwal (contributor 47572011) .