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 Stefen “Steve” Michalak

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Stefen “Steve” Michalak

Birth
Poland
Death
28 Oct 1999 (aged 83)
Winnipeg, Greater Winnipeg, Manitoba, Canada
Burial
Cremated, Location of ashes is unknown
Memorial ID
86572549 View Source

Canadian Folk Figure, known to have witnessed the Falcon Lake Incident on May 20, 1967.

Michalak, a resident of Winnipeg, Manitoba, had taken a short vacation in Whiteshell Provincial Park to prospect veins of quartz near Falcon Lake when he spotted two cigar-shaped objects descending, one of which landed near him. Michelak says he saw a door open and heard voices from inside the object, after which he tried to make contact in English and other languages but got no response. He claims to have burned his hand while attempting to examine "colourful glass" found around the object and seen a grid-like exhaust vent that expelled gas that burned his clothing.

Michalak felt pain and sickness after his encounter and was treated at a hospital, initially claiming the burns were caused by airplane exhaust. Michalak's family physician reportedly stated that Michalak was confused and dazed but rational, and showed signs of hair loss and a series of raised oval-shaped sores on Michalak's chest and abdomen in a grid-like pattern, similar to a first-degree burn. Reportedly, health problems plagued Michalak for several months, including lack of appetite, weight loss, swelling, and fainting spells, despite a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist stating that Michalak was free of "significant mental or emotional illness."

By late June 1967, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) had taken an interest in Michalak's claims. On June 26, Michalak had located the site and recovered personal belongings he had left there. The RCMP obtained soil samples from the location, which they tested for radioactivity. The tests were negative.

On July 28, Michalak and RCMP officers together identified a semicircle on the rock face at the scene, 15 feet in diameter, where the moss had been somehow removed. There were traces of radiation in a fault in the rock across the center of the landing spot. No trace of radiation was found around the outer perimeter of the circle or in the moss or grass below the raised portion of the rock. The radioactive material found in the rock fault was radium 226, a naturally occurring isotope in wide commercial use and also found in nuclear reactor waste. They concluded that the level of radiation posed no danger to humans in the area.

BIO SOURCE: WikipediaStefan Michalak, 83, died peacefully at Victoria General Hospital in Winnepeg, Manitoba, Canada on Thursday, October 28, 1999.

Stefan was born in Poland on August 7, 1916. When he came of age, he enlisted in the Polish Army and began the training that would prepare him to attain a junior officers rank at the outbreak of the Second World War. With the defeat of the Polish Army, Stefan joined his comrades in the Polish Home Army and continued the struggle as a partisan, participating in clandestine operations, which earned him the respect of his peers.

It was during this turbulent time that he met the woman who would become his wife. They were married in 1946 only to be separated again for a ten-year period after his escape from Communist-held Poland in 1948. Stefan immigrated to Canada via the Allied occupation forces in Germany. He settled in Saskatchewan and, while working on a family farm as a hired hand, began a ten-year struggle to bring his wife, daughter and son to Canada from Poland. In 1957, he was reunited with his wife and family, and in 1958, a second son was born into the family. Subsequently he and his family moved to Winnipeg where he worked as an industrial mechanic and, before his retirement, as a millwright on hydro-electric projects in Manitoba's north.

Stefan became involved in an extraterrestrial event on May 19, 1967 when he encountered a UFO near Falcon Lake in Whiteshell Park, Manitoba. The aircraft spewed flames at Michalak, leaving a grid-like pattern of burns on his abdomen that smelt of sulfur. He had these burns for the rest of his life.

Having severed his ties with his homeland, Stefan embraced his new country and was, until the last, a proud Canadian citizen. His passion for this vast, new country developed into a love of nature, open spaces, animals and birds and a celebration of what Canadas unending wilderness had to offer. Geology became one of his hobbies and the reason for many trips to the wilderness to see the world in a grain of sand. He was an accomplished painter, his canvasses often reflecting his love of nature.

Left to mourn his passing is his wife, Maria; daughter Eva; sons, Mark and Stan; his granddaughters, Christy and Marnie; daughters-in-law, Leslie and Sybil; and family members in his native Poland. The family would like to thank the nursing staff of the Victoria General Hospital for their kindness and compassion and the Department of Veterans Affairs for their generous assistance.

Canadian Folk Figure, known to have witnessed the Falcon Lake Incident on May 20, 1967.

Michalak, a resident of Winnipeg, Manitoba, had taken a short vacation in Whiteshell Provincial Park to prospect veins of quartz near Falcon Lake when he spotted two cigar-shaped objects descending, one of which landed near him. Michelak says he saw a door open and heard voices from inside the object, after which he tried to make contact in English and other languages but got no response. He claims to have burned his hand while attempting to examine "colourful glass" found around the object and seen a grid-like exhaust vent that expelled gas that burned his clothing.

Michalak felt pain and sickness after his encounter and was treated at a hospital, initially claiming the burns were caused by airplane exhaust. Michalak's family physician reportedly stated that Michalak was confused and dazed but rational, and showed signs of hair loss and a series of raised oval-shaped sores on Michalak's chest and abdomen in a grid-like pattern, similar to a first-degree burn. Reportedly, health problems plagued Michalak for several months, including lack of appetite, weight loss, swelling, and fainting spells, despite a Mayo Clinic psychiatrist stating that Michalak was free of "significant mental or emotional illness."

By late June 1967, the Royal Canadian Mounted Police (RCMP) had taken an interest in Michalak's claims. On June 26, Michalak had located the site and recovered personal belongings he had left there. The RCMP obtained soil samples from the location, which they tested for radioactivity. The tests were negative.

On July 28, Michalak and RCMP officers together identified a semicircle on the rock face at the scene, 15 feet in diameter, where the moss had been somehow removed. There were traces of radiation in a fault in the rock across the center of the landing spot. No trace of radiation was found around the outer perimeter of the circle or in the moss or grass below the raised portion of the rock. The radioactive material found in the rock fault was radium 226, a naturally occurring isotope in wide commercial use and also found in nuclear reactor waste. They concluded that the level of radiation posed no danger to humans in the area.

BIO SOURCE: WikipediaStefan Michalak, 83, died peacefully at Victoria General Hospital in Winnepeg, Manitoba, Canada on Thursday, October 28, 1999.

Stefan was born in Poland on August 7, 1916. When he came of age, he enlisted in the Polish Army and began the training that would prepare him to attain a junior officers rank at the outbreak of the Second World War. With the defeat of the Polish Army, Stefan joined his comrades in the Polish Home Army and continued the struggle as a partisan, participating in clandestine operations, which earned him the respect of his peers.

It was during this turbulent time that he met the woman who would become his wife. They were married in 1946 only to be separated again for a ten-year period after his escape from Communist-held Poland in 1948. Stefan immigrated to Canada via the Allied occupation forces in Germany. He settled in Saskatchewan and, while working on a family farm as a hired hand, began a ten-year struggle to bring his wife, daughter and son to Canada from Poland. In 1957, he was reunited with his wife and family, and in 1958, a second son was born into the family. Subsequently he and his family moved to Winnipeg where he worked as an industrial mechanic and, before his retirement, as a millwright on hydro-electric projects in Manitoba's north.

Stefan became involved in an extraterrestrial event on May 19, 1967 when he encountered a UFO near Falcon Lake in Whiteshell Park, Manitoba. The aircraft spewed flames at Michalak, leaving a grid-like pattern of burns on his abdomen that smelt of sulfur. He had these burns for the rest of his life.

Having severed his ties with his homeland, Stefan embraced his new country and was, until the last, a proud Canadian citizen. His passion for this vast, new country developed into a love of nature, open spaces, animals and birds and a celebration of what Canadas unending wilderness had to offer. Geology became one of his hobbies and the reason for many trips to the wilderness to see the world in a grain of sand. He was an accomplished painter, his canvasses often reflecting his love of nature.

Left to mourn his passing is his wife, Maria; daughter Eva; sons, Mark and Stan; his granddaughters, Christy and Marnie; daughters-in-law, Leslie and Sybil; and family members in his native Poland. The family would like to thank the nursing staff of the Victoria General Hospital for their kindness and compassion and the Department of Veterans Affairs for their generous assistance.


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