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Bass Reeves
Cenotaph

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Bass Reeves Famous memorial Veteran

Birth
Crawford County, Arkansas, USA
Death
12 Jan 1910 (aged 71)
Muskogee, Muskogee County, Oklahoma, USA
Cenotaph
Muskogee, Muskogee County, Oklahoma, USA GPS-Latitude: 35.7768757, Longitude: -95.3625854
Memorial ID
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Western Lawman. Born as a slave, after the Civil War he went west to engage in farming. In 1875 he began a new career, receiving his commission as a U.S. Deputy Marshal, under the direction of Judge Isaac C. Parker in Ft. Smith, Arkansas. He was the first African American to receive a commission as a U.S. Deputy Marshal west of the Mississippi. He acquired a reputation as one of the best deputy marshals to ever work out of the Fort Smith Federal Court. By 1901, he had arrested more than three thousand men and women in his service as a deputy marshal. But no manhunt was harder for him than the one involving his own son who was charged with murder. He returned with his son who was found guilty and sent to Leavenworth Prison. With a citizen's petition and an exemplary prison record, his son was pardoned and lived the rest of his life as a model citizen. In 35 years service as a Federal Lawman, Bass Reeves' devotion to duty was beyond reproach, he had killed 14 men but only in self-defense. He was honored posthumously with the National Cowboy Hall of Fame's "Great Westerner Award."
Western Lawman. Born as a slave, after the Civil War he went west to engage in farming. In 1875 he began a new career, receiving his commission as a U.S. Deputy Marshal, under the direction of Judge Isaac C. Parker in Ft. Smith, Arkansas. He was the first African American to receive a commission as a U.S. Deputy Marshal west of the Mississippi. He acquired a reputation as one of the best deputy marshals to ever work out of the Fort Smith Federal Court. By 1901, he had arrested more than three thousand men and women in his service as a deputy marshal. But no manhunt was harder for him than the one involving his own son who was charged with murder. He returned with his son who was found guilty and sent to Leavenworth Prison. With a citizen's petition and an exemplary prison record, his son was pardoned and lived the rest of his life as a model citizen. In 35 years service as a Federal Lawman, Bass Reeves' devotion to duty was beyond reproach, he had killed 14 men but only in self-defense. He was honored posthumously with the National Cowboy Hall of Fame's "Great Westerner Award."

Bio by: John "J-Cat" Griffith

Gravesite Details

The gravesite is unmarked and is on private residential property.



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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: John "J-Cat" Griffith
  • Added: Apr 1, 2004
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8584642/bass-reeves: accessed ), memorial page for Bass Reeves (Jul 1838–12 Jan 1910), Find a Grave Memorial ID 8584642, citing Harding Memorial, Muskogee, Muskogee County, Oklahoma, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.