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 Justus Sturdevant

Justus Sturdevant

Birth
Connecticut, USA
Death 28 Dec 1825 (aged 83–84)
Addison County, Vermont, USA
Burial Weybridge, Addison County, Vermont, USA
Memorial ID 85203205 · View Source
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Following was taken from Vermont Historical Gazetteer by Abby Hemenway, Volumne I

NEW HAVEN
Page 69
Scarcely had the early settlers began to feel secure from the inroads of the Yorkers, before the Revolution broke out and in the first years of its progress they were entirely broken up. The history of the memorable raid made in the autumn of 1778, belongs properly to Weybridge, as that town now embraces most of the section that was the scene of that merciless foray. There were two families, whose farms and places of location are now in Weybridge, that were then in New Haven. These were the families Justus Sturdevant and David Stow. This raid was made by Indians, British, and Tories. The adult males were carried off; the women and children were left, but left without shelter, or any means of subsistence. All buildings were burned; and by burning, or other modes of destruction, grain and cattle were destroyed. David Stow, and Thos. Sandford, a near neighbor, had gone to Crown Point, to mill, in a canoe. This took them down the creek to the falls, a distance of 9 miles. Here they took their canoe and grist around the falls, and then proceeded to the lake 8 miles further. They then passed up the lake, and crossed over to Crown Point. The route could not have been less than 30 miles. They were returning with their grist, and had got above the fa1ls, when they were met by the marauding party, captured with their grist taken on with the rest of the prisoners and booty. Sandford, and others, subsequently found their way back from Quebec, whither they were taken;…

WEYBRIDGE
Page 109
Thomas Sanford and Claudius Brittell, with their families, came into the unbroken forests of Weybridge; and commenced a settlement in 1775. David Stow and Justus Sturdevant , with their families, settled about the same time, in that part of New Haven now Weybridge, the former on the south side of the creek and the latter on the north. They came in boats up the creek, and located upon its banks, where they sustained themselves until the 8th of Nov. 1778, when they were taken prisoners by Indians and Tories, who burnt their houses, destroyed most of their property, and selected Mr. T. Sanford and son Robert, Mr. C. Brittell and son Claudius, Jr., Mr. D. Stow and son Clark, and Mr. Justus Sturdevant, and took then to Quebec. Mrs. T. Sanford, Mrs. C. Britte1l, and Mrs. D. Stow, and their younger children, and Mrs. Justus Sturdevant and children, were left almost destitute. The only shelter they had was a cellar, made in the ground, and covered with earth, where they remained 8 or 10 days, until the American troops came from Pittsford, and rescued them. David Stow died in prison, Dec. 31, 1778. Thomas Sanford escaped from prison, and traveling through Maine and New Hampshire, reached his family. The other prisoners, after extreme suffering, were discharged in 1782. In 1788, those families began to return to their farms in Weybridge, and other families soon came, and commenced permanent settlements…

Husband of Sarah "Sally" Hastings and Hannah Strong.


Family Members


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  • Created by: as
  • Added: 19 Feb 2012
  • Find A Grave Memorial 85203205
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Justus Sturdevant (1741–28 Dec 1825), Find A Grave Memorial no. 85203205, citing First Weybridge Hill Cemetery, Weybridge, Addison County, Vermont, USA ; Maintained by as (contributor 46814607) .