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Arthur C. “Dutch” Lonborg

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Arthur C. “Dutch” Lonborg

Birth
Gardner, Grundy County, Illinois, USA
Death
31 Jan 1985 (aged 86)
Lawrence, Douglas County, Kansas, USA
Burial
Horton, Brown County, Kansas, USA Add to Map
Memorial ID
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KANSAS SPORTS LEGEND LONBORG DIES OF ILLNESS: - February 2, 1985

Arthur C. "Dutch" Lonborg, who led the University of Kansas during one of its athletic golden eras, died Thursday night at his home after an extended illness.

Longborg, who would have been 86 on March 16, was athletic director at his alma mater from 1950 until his retirement in 1964. During those 14 years, the Jayhawks won 38 conference championships in various sports and four NCAA titles, including the national basketball crown in 1952.

Several athletic facilities still in use were built or expanded during Lonborg's tenure. Allen Field House, the home of the Jayhawk basketball team, and Quigley Field, the KU baseball field, were built during that period, and major expansion was completed at Memorial Stadium for football.

Lonborg lettered in football, basketball and baseball at Kansas. He earned all-conference honors in football and basketball, was a three-year starter at third base in baseball and was named second-team quarterback on the Walter Camp All-American team in 1920.

He earned a law degree in 1921 from KU, but never practiced the profession. He opted instead to take his winning ways into coaching, at McPherson College and Washburn University, before moving on to Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., a Chicago suburb.

IN 1973, he was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass., along with professional basketball star Dolph Schayes, a longtime star with the Syracuse Nationals, the forerunner of the Philadelphia 76ers. With Lonborg's induction, he joined Kansas immortals, such as Dr. Forrest C. "Phog" Allen, Adolph Rupp and Dr. James Naismith in the Hall of Fame.

Lonborg also was a member of the Washburn University Hall of Fame; the Helms Foundation Hall of Fame; and the Kansas Hall of Fame.

At McPherson, he had a 23-4 record in basketball before moving to Washburn, where he compiled a 63-17 record. At Northwestern over 23 seasons, his teams were 237-198 and captured two Big 10 titles.

At the time of his resignation as Kansas athletic director in 1964, he listed the high points of his career:

* The 1925 National AAU basketball title won by his Washburn University team.

* The Big Ten basketball championship won by his 1931 Northwestern Wildcats, the first basketball crown in the school's history.

* The Olympic gold medal won at Rome by the 1960 United States basketball team of which Lonborg was manager.

LONBORG'S PARENTS emigrated to the U.S. from Denmark when his mother was 18 and his father 21. He was born in Gardner, Ill., and was brought to Norton, by his parents when he was 3.

As a child he spoke Danish at home and when he got to grade school, he once explained, "I sounded so Dutchy that I acquired a nickname which has lasted a lifetime."

He served as chairman of the NCAA Basketball Tournament Committee for 13 years, from 1947 to 1960. Under his direction the NCAA tournament grew from an eight-team format to a 25-team event. He was chairman of the U.S. Basketball Committee for the 1959 Pan American Games and 1960 Olympics and was named to the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame during the 1972-73 year.

HE WAS named athletic director-emeritus at KU following his retirement and continued some duties with the university's athletic staff.

Lonborg is survived by his wife, Edna; a son, Arthur C. Lonborg of Wichita, and two brothers, John Lonborg of Liberty, Mo., and Adolph Lonborg of Kansas City, Kan.

Funeral arrangements are pending with Warren-McElwain Mortuary.
KANSAS SPORTS LEGEND LONBORG DIES OF ILLNESS: - February 2, 1985

Arthur C. "Dutch" Lonborg, who led the University of Kansas during one of its athletic golden eras, died Thursday night at his home after an extended illness.

Longborg, who would have been 86 on March 16, was athletic director at his alma mater from 1950 until his retirement in 1964. During those 14 years, the Jayhawks won 38 conference championships in various sports and four NCAA titles, including the national basketball crown in 1952.

Several athletic facilities still in use were built or expanded during Lonborg's tenure. Allen Field House, the home of the Jayhawk basketball team, and Quigley Field, the KU baseball field, were built during that period, and major expansion was completed at Memorial Stadium for football.

Lonborg lettered in football, basketball and baseball at Kansas. He earned all-conference honors in football and basketball, was a three-year starter at third base in baseball and was named second-team quarterback on the Walter Camp All-American team in 1920.

He earned a law degree in 1921 from KU, but never practiced the profession. He opted instead to take his winning ways into coaching, at McPherson College and Washburn University, before moving on to Northwestern University in Evanston, Ill., a Chicago suburb.

IN 1973, he was inducted into the Basketball Hall of Fame in Springfield, Mass., along with professional basketball star Dolph Schayes, a longtime star with the Syracuse Nationals, the forerunner of the Philadelphia 76ers. With Lonborg's induction, he joined Kansas immortals, such as Dr. Forrest C. "Phog" Allen, Adolph Rupp and Dr. James Naismith in the Hall of Fame.

Lonborg also was a member of the Washburn University Hall of Fame; the Helms Foundation Hall of Fame; and the Kansas Hall of Fame.

At McPherson, he had a 23-4 record in basketball before moving to Washburn, where he compiled a 63-17 record. At Northwestern over 23 seasons, his teams were 237-198 and captured two Big 10 titles.

At the time of his resignation as Kansas athletic director in 1964, he listed the high points of his career:

* The 1925 National AAU basketball title won by his Washburn University team.

* The Big Ten basketball championship won by his 1931 Northwestern Wildcats, the first basketball crown in the school's history.

* The Olympic gold medal won at Rome by the 1960 United States basketball team of which Lonborg was manager.

LONBORG'S PARENTS emigrated to the U.S. from Denmark when his mother was 18 and his father 21. He was born in Gardner, Ill., and was brought to Norton, by his parents when he was 3.

As a child he spoke Danish at home and when he got to grade school, he once explained, "I sounded so Dutchy that I acquired a nickname which has lasted a lifetime."

He served as chairman of the NCAA Basketball Tournament Committee for 13 years, from 1947 to 1960. Under his direction the NCAA tournament grew from an eight-team format to a 25-team event. He was chairman of the U.S. Basketball Committee for the 1959 Pan American Games and 1960 Olympics and was named to the Naismith Basketball Hall of Fame during the 1972-73 year.

HE WAS named athletic director-emeritus at KU following his retirement and continued some duties with the university's athletic staff.

Lonborg is survived by his wife, Edna; a son, Arthur C. Lonborg of Wichita, and two brothers, John Lonborg of Liberty, Mo., and Adolph Lonborg of Kansas City, Kan.

Funeral arrangements are pending with Warren-McElwain Mortuary.


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