Charles Coker Wilson

Charles Coker Wilson

Birth
Hartsville, Darlington County, South Carolina, USA
Death 26 Jan 1933 (aged 68)
Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina, USA
Burial Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina, USA
Memorial ID 84442186 · View Source
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Son of Dr. Furman Edwards Wilson and Jane Lide Coker Wilson. He married Adeline Selby of Columbia, and they had two daughters, Elizabeth and Jean.

He was an architect based in Columbia, South Carolina. Charles graduated from South Carolina College with an engineering degree in 1886, continuing on to receive his master's in 1888. He briefly studied architecture in the Atelier Duray at the École des Beaux-Arts in Paris. Much of his work contained Beaux-Arts elements. A number of his works are listed on the U.S. National Register of Historic Places.

CHARLES C. WILSON DIES AT HOSPITAL
Eminent Architect Passes After Operation
Devoted Columbia
Designer Of Many Buildings In Six States

Charles Coker Wilson, eminent architect, died at 8:15 o'clock yesterday morning at the Columbia Hospital. Nearly two weeks ago, Mr. Wilson underwent an operation at the hospital from which it was expected that he would recover. He was taken to his home, 1420 Gervais Street a week ago, but he showed no improvement and Wednesday afternoon he became suddenly worse and it was necessary to take him to the hospital again for a second operation, and he died yesterday morning without regaining consciousness.

Charles Coker Wilson was born in Hartsville, November 20, 1864, and was the son of Dr. Furman Edwards Wilson and his wife, Mrs. Jane Lide Coker Wilson. His ancestors were Scotch-Irish and Welsh, early settlers in the Pee Dee section of South Carolina. His four grandfathers, Dr. James P. Wilson, Enoch Evans, Thomas Coker and Maj. Robert Lide did service on the patriot side in the American Revolution, serving under General Francis Marion. Mr. Wilson spent his boyhood in Hartsville and on a plantation in the Society Hill section of Darlington County. He attended the South Carolina college and in 1886 graduated in the course of mechanics and engineering under the especial guidance of that great West Pointer, Maj. Benjamin Sloan. Upon graduation he secured a position as assistant civil engineer on the Columbia, Newberry & Laurens railroad, then building, under Charles Ellis, chief engineer. In this work he was stationed in Columbia, and he took advantage of this to pursue his studies and win the degree of C.E. in 1888. Subsequently he took a course in modern languages and was given the degree of master of arts. in 1899 and 1900 Mr. Wilson studied architecture in Paris in the Atelier Duray.

Returning to Columbia he first gave a good part of his time to civil engineering and he found much to do in railway location and construction, highways, water supplies, sewerage and sewage disposal. He built the bridge for the Columbia, Newberry & Laurens railroad over the Saluda. This was subsequently swept away by a flood. He supervised the paving on South Main Street from the Union Station, north. He was the first to propose and compound the formula for sand-clay roads which were a blessing to SC and other states before they thought they had money enough to build paved roads. His love for Columbia was great and he dreamed great dreams for this city. His latest project was the housing plans and the eradication of the LaMotte's bottoms eyesore of the city. His preference was for architecture, and he was a devoted student of the life and works of the great American architect, Robert Mills, a South Carolinian by birth. Mills was supervising architect of the government buildings in Washington and Mills continued so until his death in about 1854. It was but fitting that Mr. Wilson should have been appointed to the commission which now has supervision of the reconstruction of Washington city. Mr. Wilson's architectural clientele extended over North and South Carolina, Virginia, Georgia, Florida and Alabama. For some years he maintained a branch office in Gastonia, N.C., near which city he did a great amount of the mill construction. He built LeConte and Davis colleges and Thornwell and Woodrow dormitories at the University of SC. He was the architect for the great Halifax hospital at Daytona Beach, Fla., St. Luke's hospital, Tryon, Meredith college, Raleigh, NC and a great number of public and private buildings in the states named.

Mr. Wilson is survived by his widow, who was before marriage Miss Adeline Selby, whom he married December 23, 1889; two daughters, Mrs. Benjamin A. Knowlton of Newberry who has three children, Charles Wilson, Benjamin A. and Elizabeth Winslow Wilson Knowlton and Mrs. Robert Lide Carroll of Los Angeles, Calif., who has one child, a son, Robert Lide Carroll, Jr. Mrs. Carroll is on her way to Columbia by airplane, and is expected to arrive in Atlanta tomorrow and in Columbia probably Saturday morning. Other survivors are three brothers, James Lide Wilson of Greenwood, William Coker Wilson of Darlington, and Edward Furman Wilson of Irwin, Pa.; four sisters, Mrs. Robert Lide of Greenville, Miss Marion Evans Wilson, Miss Fannie P. Wilson and Miss Sue S. Wilson of Society Hill.

Published in The State, January 27, 1933



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  • Created by: robin pellicci moore
  • Added: 3 Feb 2012
  • Find A Grave Memorial 84442186
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Charles Coker Wilson (20 Nov 1864–26 Jan 1933), Find A Grave Memorial no. 84442186, citing Elmwood Memorial Gardens, Columbia, Richland County, South Carolina, USA ; Maintained by robin pellicci moore (contributor 46903322) .