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 Benjamin Brundage

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Benjamin Brundage

Birth
Seneca County, Ohio, USA
Death
29 Jan 1911 (aged 76)
Bakersfield, Kern County, California, USA
Burial
Bakersfield, Kern County, California, USA
Plot
Haven of Rest, 62-15
Memorial ID
84246753 View Source

HON. BENJAMIN BRUNDAGE.— The genealogical records of the Brundage family bear evidence concerning their long and honorable identification with America as well as their Anglo-Saxon extraction, indicating also that the name was established in the new world by three brothers from England, one of whom settled in York state, another in New Jersey and the third in Pennsylvania. Thomas, a native of New York and a descendant of the original immigrant to that state, followed the tide of migration into Ohio, where he took up raw land near McCutchenville, Wyandot county, and improved a large farm.

In his family there was a son, Benjamin, who became a successful attorney and honored jurist of Rakersfield, rising to influence through his own unaided efforts and the development of his splendid mental faculties. Working his way to the law through faithful services as a teacher, he was ad-
mitted to the bar and practiced law at Sandusky, Ohio. At the time of Morgan's raid he enlisted and served as a private in a regiment of Ohio state militia. Immediately after receiving an honorable discharge from the army in the spring of 1865 he came to California and for a few months sojourned in San Francisco, where he acted as agent for an insurance company.

During the autumn of 1865 he arrived in Kern county and opened a law office at Havilah, then the county-seat. In a short time his ability had won recognition. When the question of county-seat removal began to be agitated he was engaged by citizens of Bakersfield to appear before the state legislature and secure the passage of a bill for the removal, which task he engineered to a successful and satisfactory consummation. Shortly afterward he removed his office to the new county-seat and continued his practice from this point. On the adoption of the new constitution he was elected the first superior judge and filled the position for one term, later returning to his private practice, which he conducted with unimpaired ability until six years prior to his demise. The close of his useful existence came January 29, 1911, when he had reached the age of seventy-seven years.

Upon coming west Judge Brundage was unmarried and it was in California that he first met the young lady who became his wife in the city of Sacramento, March 27, 1870. Mary B. Lively was born in Yelvington, Daviess county, Ky., and is now a resident of Bakersfield. At a very early age she was brought to the west by her father. Dr. Joseph Lively, who crossed the plains with wagon and oxen during the summer of 1850, and after a short sojourn in Nevada county began to practice medicine at Santa Clara in the county of that name. Later he removed to Glennville, Kern county, where from 1866 until his removal to Irvington, Alameda county, he engaged in professional work. For a time he also conducted the Hotel Glennville. His demise occurred at Watsonville. At the time of the removal of the family to Kern county the daughter was a young lady, well educated for tliat day and a decided accession to the social and educational circles of the community. She was one of tlie first school teacliers in Havilah and there she met Judge Brundasje, who filled the office of school trustee. Their marriage was blessed with three children and two of these, Benjamin L. and George H., are still living. Tiiroughout the county where for so many years he made his home Judge Brundage was well known and universally honored.

Source: (Public Domain) History of Kern County, California, with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the present.

HON. BENJAMIN BRUNDAGE.— The genealogical records of the Brundage family bear evidence concerning their long and honorable identification with America as well as their Anglo-Saxon extraction, indicating also that the name was established in the new world by three brothers from England, one of whom settled in York state, another in New Jersey and the third in Pennsylvania. Thomas, a native of New York and a descendant of the original immigrant to that state, followed the tide of migration into Ohio, where he took up raw land near McCutchenville, Wyandot county, and improved a large farm.

In his family there was a son, Benjamin, who became a successful attorney and honored jurist of Rakersfield, rising to influence through his own unaided efforts and the development of his splendid mental faculties. Working his way to the law through faithful services as a teacher, he was ad-
mitted to the bar and practiced law at Sandusky, Ohio. At the time of Morgan's raid he enlisted and served as a private in a regiment of Ohio state militia. Immediately after receiving an honorable discharge from the army in the spring of 1865 he came to California and for a few months sojourned in San Francisco, where he acted as agent for an insurance company.

During the autumn of 1865 he arrived in Kern county and opened a law office at Havilah, then the county-seat. In a short time his ability had won recognition. When the question of county-seat removal began to be agitated he was engaged by citizens of Bakersfield to appear before the state legislature and secure the passage of a bill for the removal, which task he engineered to a successful and satisfactory consummation. Shortly afterward he removed his office to the new county-seat and continued his practice from this point. On the adoption of the new constitution he was elected the first superior judge and filled the position for one term, later returning to his private practice, which he conducted with unimpaired ability until six years prior to his demise. The close of his useful existence came January 29, 1911, when he had reached the age of seventy-seven years.

Upon coming west Judge Brundage was unmarried and it was in California that he first met the young lady who became his wife in the city of Sacramento, March 27, 1870. Mary B. Lively was born in Yelvington, Daviess county, Ky., and is now a resident of Bakersfield. At a very early age she was brought to the west by her father. Dr. Joseph Lively, who crossed the plains with wagon and oxen during the summer of 1850, and after a short sojourn in Nevada county began to practice medicine at Santa Clara in the county of that name. Later he removed to Glennville, Kern county, where from 1866 until his removal to Irvington, Alameda county, he engaged in professional work. For a time he also conducted the Hotel Glennville. His demise occurred at Watsonville. At the time of the removal of the family to Kern county the daughter was a young lady, well educated for tliat day and a decided accession to the social and educational circles of the community. She was one of tlie first school teacliers in Havilah and there she met Judge Brundasje, who filled the office of school trustee. Their marriage was blessed with three children and two of these, Benjamin L. and George H., are still living. Tiiroughout the county where for so many years he made his home Judge Brundage was well known and universally honored.

Source: (Public Domain) History of Kern County, California, with biographical sketches of the leading men and women of the county who have been identified with its growth and development from the early days to the present.


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