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 Sam Flint

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Sam Flint Famous memorial

Original Name
Samuel Addison Ethridge
Birth
Lawrenceville, Gwinnett County, Georgia, USA
Death
17 Oct 1980 (aged 97)
Woodland Hills, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Burial
Houston, Harris County, Texas, USA
Plot
Oak Hill - Section 22
Memorial ID
83728170 View Source

Actor. He is best remembered for his portrayal of the staunch Henry Wilson in "Timber Fury" (1950). Born Samuel Ethridge, he was raised within a family of wealth and position, the son of a naval office and a well-respected socialite, after receiving his formal education in several private schools, he began his career as a leading man on the stage in stock companies. Upon being introduced to director Charles Vidor while attending a dinner party at the prestigious Beverly Hills Hotel, he was so impressed by his dark good looks, slim physique, and booming voice, that he took notice of his potential and arranged for him to begin a career in the film industry beginning with him appearing under his supervision per a supporting role in "Sensational Hunters" (1933). From there, he would go on to flourish as a notable character actor appearing in over 370 features; often typecast as husbands, fathers, aristocrats, white-collared workers, doctors, politicians, lawyers, judges, senators, district attorneys, military men, sergeants, policemen, detectives, reporters, sheriffs, policemen, managers, businessmen, coroners, clergymen, retail clerks, captains, bankers, colonels, cowboys, guards, eccentrics, curmudgeons, landlords, neighbors, educators, administrators, wealthy bachelors, and patriarchs. He appeared in such feature films as "Mr. Skitch" (1933), "The Girl from Missouri" (1934), "Wings in the Dark" (1935), "A Face in the Fog" (1936), "Man of the People" (1937), "State Police" (1938), "I Take This Oath" (1940), "Road to Happiness" (1941), "Wildcat" (1942), "Dead Men Walk" (1943), "Cover Girl" (1944), "I'll Remember April" (1945), "Junior Prom" (1946), "Lost Honeymoon" (1947), "Phantom Valley" (1948), "Ringside" (1949), "Bright Leaf" (1950), "Belle Le Grand" (1951), "Road Agent" (1952), "Devil's Canyon" (1953), "Loophole" (1954), "Unchained" (1955), "The Brass Legend" (1956), "Snowfire" (1957), "Gunman's Walk" (1958), "The FBI Story" (1959), "Psycho" (1960), "Snow White and the Three Stooges" (1961), "Sunday in New York" (1963), "The Swinger" (1966), and "Head" (1968). On television, he appeared in numerous guest spots on such syndicated sitcoms as "The Stu Erwin Show," "Boston Blackie," "Rebound," "Beulah," "The Lone Ranger," "Adventures of Superman," "Family Theatre," "Captain Midnight," "Fireside Theatre," "Treasury Men in Action," "Sky King," "Cavalcade of America," "Hey, Jeannie!," "Annie Oakley," "Broken Arrow," "Highway Patrol," "Maverick," "The Red Skelton Hour," "Father Knows Best," "The Donna Reed Show," "My Three Sons," "The Untouchables," "Dr. Kildare," "Cheyenne," "Perry Mason," "Death Valley Days," "Gunsmoke," "The Wild Wild West," "and "Iron Horse". During his career, he was a member of the Screen Actors Guild, was supportive of the Motion Picture and Television Fund, had been a regular parishioner of the Episcopal church, was a member of the Hollywood Republican Committee, presided as a chairman for his local charters of the American Red Cross and the Boys & Girls Clubs, was a theatrical instructor for the Pasadena Playhouse, had been a commercial model for the Forbes Agency, and he was married to fellow character actress Ella Ethridge from 1920 until his death (their union produced no children). Following his 1968 retirement, he spent the remainder of his life centered on charitable and religious causes until his death.

Actor. He is best remembered for his portrayal of the staunch Henry Wilson in "Timber Fury" (1950). Born Samuel Ethridge, he was raised within a family of wealth and position, the son of a naval office and a well-respected socialite, after receiving his formal education in several private schools, he began his career as a leading man on the stage in stock companies. Upon being introduced to director Charles Vidor while attending a dinner party at the prestigious Beverly Hills Hotel, he was so impressed by his dark good looks, slim physique, and booming voice, that he took notice of his potential and arranged for him to begin a career in the film industry beginning with him appearing under his supervision per a supporting role in "Sensational Hunters" (1933). From there, he would go on to flourish as a notable character actor appearing in over 370 features; often typecast as husbands, fathers, aristocrats, white-collared workers, doctors, politicians, lawyers, judges, senators, district attorneys, military men, sergeants, policemen, detectives, reporters, sheriffs, policemen, managers, businessmen, coroners, clergymen, retail clerks, captains, bankers, colonels, cowboys, guards, eccentrics, curmudgeons, landlords, neighbors, educators, administrators, wealthy bachelors, and patriarchs. He appeared in such feature films as "Mr. Skitch" (1933), "The Girl from Missouri" (1934), "Wings in the Dark" (1935), "A Face in the Fog" (1936), "Man of the People" (1937), "State Police" (1938), "I Take This Oath" (1940), "Road to Happiness" (1941), "Wildcat" (1942), "Dead Men Walk" (1943), "Cover Girl" (1944), "I'll Remember April" (1945), "Junior Prom" (1946), "Lost Honeymoon" (1947), "Phantom Valley" (1948), "Ringside" (1949), "Bright Leaf" (1950), "Belle Le Grand" (1951), "Road Agent" (1952), "Devil's Canyon" (1953), "Loophole" (1954), "Unchained" (1955), "The Brass Legend" (1956), "Snowfire" (1957), "Gunman's Walk" (1958), "The FBI Story" (1959), "Psycho" (1960), "Snow White and the Three Stooges" (1961), "Sunday in New York" (1963), "The Swinger" (1966), and "Head" (1968). On television, he appeared in numerous guest spots on such syndicated sitcoms as "The Stu Erwin Show," "Boston Blackie," "Rebound," "Beulah," "The Lone Ranger," "Adventures of Superman," "Family Theatre," "Captain Midnight," "Fireside Theatre," "Treasury Men in Action," "Sky King," "Cavalcade of America," "Hey, Jeannie!," "Annie Oakley," "Broken Arrow," "Highway Patrol," "Maverick," "The Red Skelton Hour," "Father Knows Best," "The Donna Reed Show," "My Three Sons," "The Untouchables," "Dr. Kildare," "Cheyenne," "Perry Mason," "Death Valley Days," "Gunsmoke," "The Wild Wild West," "and "Iron Horse". During his career, he was a member of the Screen Actors Guild, was supportive of the Motion Picture and Television Fund, had been a regular parishioner of the Episcopal church, was a member of the Hollywood Republican Committee, presided as a chairman for his local charters of the American Red Cross and the Boys & Girls Clubs, was a theatrical instructor for the Pasadena Playhouse, had been a commercial model for the Forbes Agency, and he was married to fellow character actress Ella Ethridge from 1920 until his death (their union produced no children). Following his 1968 retirement, he spent the remainder of his life centered on charitable and religious causes until his death.

Bio by: Lowell Thurgood


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: gordonphilbin
  • Added: 20 Jan 2012
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 83728170
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/83728170/sam-flint: accessed ), memorial page for Sam Flint (19 Oct 1882–17 Oct 1980), Find a Grave Memorial ID 83728170, citing Forest Park Cemetery, Houston, Harris County, Texas, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.