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Rev Friedrich Konrad Dietrich Wyneken

Rev Friedrich Konrad Dietrich Wyneken

Birth
Germany
Death 4 May 1876 (aged 65)
San Francisco, San Francisco County, California, USA
Burial Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA
Plot Section G, Lot 42, Grave 27
Memorial ID 83714205 · View Source
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Friedrich's parents were HEINRICH CHRISTOPH WYNEKEN & ANNE CATHERINE LOUISE nee MEYER. He was the tenth of eleven children (six sons and five daughters) nine of which survived infancy. His father, pastor of St. Andreas Church in Verden, died when Wyneken was only five years old, leaving his mother to raise nine children. She did an admirable job; all six sons went on to a university (three studied theology and three studied law) and two daughters married pastors.

He was ordained on 08 May 8 1837 at St. Wilhadi Church in Stade. Leaving his family and friends, the twenty-eight year old Friedrich embarked for America in May 1838. He was an itinerant preacher from Baltimore to Pennsylvania until September 1838 when he went to Indiana, and was first active in preaching the Gospel to the poor scattered German Lutherans in Adams County; but he soon came to Ft. Wayne and became minister to St. Paul congregation, and so continued for seven years, then in Baltimore for 5 years, subsequently for 4 years in St Louis, and after stepping down from his office as president of synod, for another 10 years in Cleveland West.

On August 31, 1841, he was married to SOPHIA BUUCH, daughter of the first settler in Friedheim - Preble Township (Adams County), IN. Shortly after this, Pastor Wyneken and his new bride embarked for Germany for the purpose of seeking treatment for his throat ailment and to appeal for help for the German Lutherans in America.

He died on May 04, 1876 in San Francisco, a week short of his sixty-sixth birthday. He had traveled from Cleveland to reside with his daughter's family, hoping the climate would improve his health. On the 6th in San Francisco there was a very emotional funeral at which Wyeneken's son-in-law, Pastor Buehler, preached. The next morning, as Lindemann recounts, Mrs. Wyneken and her son-in-law left for St. Louis, accompanying the body. They arrived on what would have been Wyneken's sixty-sixth birthday, the evening of the 13th. The next day, C.F.W. Walther preached a funeral sermon at Trinity where the body was on view. The sermon text was I Corinthians 2:2, "For I determined to know nothing among you save Jesus Christ and him crucified." Walther's sermon manuscript does not appear to have survived. As Lindemann recounts, the body arrived in Ft. Wayne on the 15th. A procession of pastors, students and members of St. Paul's escorted the casket into the church. Dr. Sihler preached. He had followed Wyneken as pastor of St. Paul's in 1845. On the 16th Wyneken's wife and son-in-law arrived with the body in Cleveland. The final funeral was held at 2:00 p.m. with an overflowing crowd. Burial was in Cleveland, OH.

REV. WYNEKEN IN BALTIMORE, MD
Lutheranism in Baltimore had its beginnings in 1760 when a group of members of the German Reformed Church withdrew to establish the first German Lutheran Church. This was located on Saratoga Street. The church soon outgrew its building and moved to Gay and Lexington Streets in 1808. Known as Zion Lutheran, this church still stands. Friction developed over the lax attitude of the Council concerning questions of doctrine. The Reverend J. C. P. Haesbert along with 150 members left Zion and established a church in a building on Holliday and Saratoga Streets on 01 November 1835. This congregation became the Second German Evangelical Lutheran Church. The church grew in numbers. In 1837 a school building was added. Pastor Haesbert resigned in 1844 and was succeeded by the Reverend F. C. D. Wyneken, who ministered to the scattered Germans throughout Ohio and Indiana and established 53 congregations, soon found that the practices of the church were not strictly Lutheran. A goodly number of parishioners were of the Reformed faith and would not be convinced otherwise, so he simply advised them to separate and form a church of their own. Thus the First German Reformed Church, located on Calvert Street, originated. The Lutheran group changed the congregation's name to St. Paul. The church was in walking distance for most of the congregation, however, the distance was too far to send their children to school there. The parish was divided into three school districts, Eastern, Western and Southern. This was done under the leadership of Friedrich Konrad Dietrich Wyneken. Pastor Wyneken enlarged the school and laid plans for establishing branch schools in East, Northwest, and South Baltimore. After five years of service he accepted a call from the Trinity Church in St. Louis. Because of his ability as a missionary organizer, he was later chosen to become the second President of the Missouri Synod, which he had helped organize in 1847. As his successor at St. Paul he recommended the Reverend E. G. W. Keyl, who had been active in missionary work in the Missouri Valley and helped design the "Saxon Community" in Perry County, Missouri, birthplace of the LCMS. (Pastor Keyl was a brother-in-law of Dr. Carl F. W. Walther, who also came over from Saxony and settled in Missouri with Walther and established the LCMS)



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  • Created by: donald knopf
  • Added: 19 Jan 2012
  • Find A Grave Memorial 83714205
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Rev Friedrich Konrad Dietrich Wyneken (13 May 1810–4 May 1876), Find A Grave Memorial no. 83714205, citing Lutheran Cemetery, Cleveland, Cuyahoga County, Ohio, USA ; Maintained by donald knopf (contributor 5792782) .