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Dr Frank Taylor Reynolds

Dr Frank Taylor Reynolds

Birth
Springville, Utah County, Utah, USA
Death 7 Nov 1979 (aged 84)
Provo, Utah County, Utah, USA
Burial Springville, Utah County, Utah, USA
Plot Sec. D Lot 23 Pos. 2
Memorial ID 83438 · View Source
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Married Alice Deal on Feb 4, 1920 in Springville, UT
(bio by: Loose Moose)
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The life of Joseph Darnbrough Reynolds
Written by one of his grandson Dr. Frank Taylor Reynolds

My grandfather, Joseph Darnbrough Reynolds, was born 3 February 1833 in Campsall, Yorkshire, England. He was the son of Mark Reynolds and Martha Darnbrough and was the second child in the family of eight, five girls and three boys. His father was a very stern man and his word was law. He was a gentleman gardener and each season would put on a fair of his garden. He was sent for by people many miles around to judge fruits and flowers.
Before grandfather was ten years old, he went to a Mrs. Pearson's private school where there were children from the ages of six to ten. The school was held in her home and the children had jolly good times. When he turned ten years old, he went several miles away to the National School for Boys for two and a half years. It was at this school that he met George Storrs who was also a student there.
On 9 March 1846, when only a lad of thirteen years, he was apprenticed as a tailor. George Storrs lived about two miles from the Reynolds' home and grandfather lived with him for seven years to learn the art of tailoring. He said the food was of the coursest sort and many times he did not have enough to eat.
During those boyhood days, Mary Woolerton, a devout Methodist, had taken great interest in grandfather. She later joined the L.D.S. Church and was anxious to tell him about it. She gave him several tracts and had him read of the Fulness of the Gospel. At this time, he had been making some clothes for George Storrs' father. Mr. Storrs had been baptized and was very anxious that grandfather should be also. On 3 June 1849, when the Elders came, he went to hear them talk of The Restoration of The Gospel and on the Apostasy. He had the Gospel come to him so forcibly that he knew at once it was true. That very day, he was baptized at age sixteen.
His family belonged to the Primative Methodist Church. His father was a trustee in that church and very opposed to Grandfather joining the Mormon Church. His parents contacted a rich uncle in London who offered him an interest in a large mercantile business if he would only listen to reason.
But he was obstinate and refused to do so thus separating himself from old associates and relatives. He no doubt felt the force of the Gospel as it takes character and stamina to turn yourself as a youth from all that is dear.
Joseph was ordained a Priest on 5 August 1849 and he and two other members were sent to surrounding villages on Sundays to tract and preach. On 15 Aug 1852, he was ordained an Elder and was chosen as the Branch President. He presided over the Branch for two years and then moved to the Sheffield Branch about thirty miles away on 27 November 1854. It was the time of the Russian Crimean War and he left his apprenticeship for there was a great demand for uniforms and other wearing apparel. He worked in eight different shops and in one year saved enough money to make the journey to Utah.
On Sunday, 22 Apr 1855, there were 581 Saints, under the direction of Israel Barlow, who set sail from Liverpool. It was the maiden voyage of the ship "Samuel Carling" named after its captain. The first part of the voyage was very pleasant until the ship swerved from its course and they found themselves in the midst of icebergs. They sailed in this area for a day and a night and as they neared Newfoundland the wind and storm became so severe that they could no longer control the ship. They had to let it steer its own course and trusted in the Lord to save them all. For three days, the storm raged and no one was allowed on deck during this time. At the end of the third day, the Saints were called together and they fasted and prayed. In great faith they called upon the Lord to calm the maddened sea. Soon an extreme calm fell upon the waters and the vessel was still for three days. The captain of the ship afterwards joined the Church, for he said he knew it was the prayers of the Saints that had saved their lives. The buffeting of the storm had torn the sails of the ship into shreds and father was called on to use his tailoring ability to mend the damaged sails. Finally, a good wind came up and carried them south and they docked safely in New York Harbor on 27 May 1855. Brother Maben, who was in the Presidency of the Manti Temple about fifty years ago, was in the same company and he told many times of this terrible experience.
From New York, the Saints continued by rail to Pittsburgh and then by steamboat past St. Louis, Missouri and eventually stopped at Atchison, Kansas. While on the journey down the Mississippi, there was a severe cholera epidemic, but, by the power of the Priesthood, all the Saints recovered before the end of the journey. They camped at Mormon Grove for six weeks and grandfather occupied himself by making tents and wagon covers. They soon started west again in the company of Captain Harper; there were five Lieutenants in the company who had charge of five wagons each.
At this time, grandfather was 22 years of age. Some of his friends were hired out to drive teams for private persons and were to receive pay for the same. One of the authorities persuaded grandfather to drive an ox team for the Church without pay to Salt Lake City and prophesied he would have more money when he arrived there than any of his friends. He delighted in telling that he arrived with one English penny in his pocket while the others were completely broke. One afternoon, while they were on the march, they were surrounded by Indians. Captain Harper made everything ready for the expected attack, but peace was negotiated at last by 2 o'clock in the morning. The Indians were given food and the Saints were left unmolested. They arrived in Salt Lake City on Monday 29 October 1855, there being 39 wagons in all.
Grandfather and several men friends lived in Salt Lake City during that first winter. A friend visited him and advised him that he could find a better place to live, so on 1 April 1856 he moved to the home of Samuel Grange on the corner of 1st South and 2nd West. It was here that he met and married Elizabeth Taylor on 11 Mar 1857. She and her mother had been in the frozen handcart co. that came west in the fall of 1856. The bride and groom were later sealed to each other in the Endowment House. Grandfather moved his bride to a section of the old fort where they experienced many hardships in making their new home together. He spent much of his time with the needle to make ends meet.
In 1860, he took his wife and two small children to Camp Floyd where he made clothes for Johnston's Army before they were moved to Mexico and then the eastern states. In 1866, he served as a home guard during the Black Hawk War. It was about this time that he purchased property on the corner of Main Street and 2nd South in Springville and built a very fine six-room house. In 1902 this house was torn down to build the big Reynolds Store on that corner.
He had a twenty acre farm in Dry Creek that kept him and his sons busy. Each morning, one of them would walk to Maple Canyon for his ox team. The family was kept busy with a farm on Sage Creek. He was often called the "broad- cloth farmer" for he had purchased a lot of material in England before coming here. He had planned on being a tailor and not a farmer and work clothes were very hard to come by. He made most of his suits in England and wore them a few times to save taxes. Most of his tailoring work was done before breakfast and after supper. Often he would sit on his tailoring table with legs crossed until after midnight to finish some special suit that had been ordered. Until 1872 all of his work had been done by hand. At this time he purchased a special sewing machine which was a great help to him. He did all the upholstering and made curtains for the old white meeting house.
On 22 November 1877, his wife, Elizabeth, passed away leaving him with seven children; one daughter had died when a small child. On 9 May 1878, he married my grandmother Jane Sinclair, my mother eventually being their only child, and also Samantha Jane Sellers who became the mother of six children.
Grandfather always took part in community affairs but never forgot what had brought him to America. His Church was always uttermost in his thoughts and actions. He was ordained a Seventy 15 March 1865 and a High Priest 29 April 1893. He was an excellent penman and for over 35 years was a clerk in the Priesthood Quorums. He was also a heavy donator to church and civic affairs. His home, on Main Street, was a gathering place for the Saints and open house for the church authorities when they came to Springville. For a number of years he was an active school trustee.
In 1882, he started a mercantile business with his second son Henry. His credit was excellent and he always paid a debt before it was due. He was set apart as a missionary by Heber J. Grant. In 1887, he married Sarah Ann Williams and the same year left for a mission to England. He was received very kindly by his family in England but was successful in converting only a very few of them. He converted a Robinson family while there and helped them to emigrate to Utah. (They have a burial plot beside the Pace plot in the City Cemetery in Springville) He gathered much genealogy of his ancestors while in England and also of my grandmother's and they completed an enormous temple work. He also donated a great deal to make it possible for others to do work for the dead.
Joseph Darnbrough Reynolds was remembered by all his friends and neighbors as one of the most quiet and unassuming of men. He was beloved by all wherever he happened to be. He was a great defender of the Faith and leaned on the Lord, but he never did push himself forward. He would always befriend anyone in need of help, whether financial or otherwise. He was a very modest man but when in the right he would fight for the right.
After a short illness, he passed away 2 March 1913. His life was gentle and the elements so mixed in him that nature might stand up and say to all the world "This was a man."

Bio by: Loose Moose


Gravesite Details Cause of Death: Short Illness

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  • Maintained by: Rose Wright
  • Originally Created by: Utah State Historical Society
  • Added: 2 Feb 2000
  • Find A Grave Memorial 83438
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Dr Frank Taylor Reynolds (7 Sep 1895–7 Nov 1979), Find A Grave Memorial no. 83438, citing Evergreen Cemetery, Springville, Utah County, Utah, USA ; Maintained by Rose Wright (contributor 46889763) .