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 Philippa d'Avesnes of Hainault

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Philippa d'Avesnes of Hainault Famous memorial

Birth
Valenciennes, Departement du Nord, Nord-Pas-de-Calais, France
Death
14 Aug 1369 (aged 56)
Windsor, Windsor and Maidenhead Royal Borough, Berkshire, England
Burial
Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England
Plot
south side of the Confessor's chapel
Memorial ID
8341702 View Source

English Queen Consort. She was the daughter of Guillaume I, Comte de Hainault, referred to as "the Good," and his wife, Jeanne de Valois, a sister of Philip VI, King of France. Philippa was betrothed at the age of thirteen to the future King Edward III of England, cementing an alliance between her homeland and England, but also between her father and Edward III's mother, Isabella of France, in support of Isabella's efforts to seize the throne from her husband, King Edward II. They were officially married at York Minster on January 24, 1328, less than one year after Edward III had been crowned following the deposition of his father, King Edward II. A papal dispensation had been required as they were second cousins, both being great-grandchildren of King Philip III of France. She was crowned as queen consort on February 18, 1330 at Westminster Abbey while pregnant with her first child, Edward, Prince of Wales, more commonly known as Edward the Black Prince. Philippa was admired as a model queen and stood in stark contrast to her scheming mother-in-law, Dowager Queen Isabella, widow of King Edward II. She was admired for her gentleness, which was shown famously in an incident that occurred at Calais. Following the English victory at the Battle of Crécy, Edward III had laid siege to Calais (September 4, 1346-August 3, 1347). The city had been ordered by King Philip VI of France to hold out and not surrender, but starvation forced them to do so. Jean Froissart, a contemporary chronicler, recorded that Edward offered to spare the citizens of Calais in exchange for the surrender of six burghers, who were directed to wear nooses around their necks and carry the keys to the city with them. The burghers fully expected their lives to be forfeit, but Philippa intervened with her husband and convinced him to show mercy, sparing their lives. Conversely, she could show great bravery and martial zeal when necessary. Acting as regent for Edward III while he was on a military campaign in France, she repelled a Scottish invasion of England which had been made at the behest of their French allies, assembling an army and confronting the Scots at the Battle of Neville's Cross on October 17, 1346, half a mile west of Durham, England. Philippa rallied the English soldiers while on horseback prior to the battle and it proved to be a resounding English victory in which the Scottish king, David II, was taken prisoner. She demonstrated her loyalty to her husband by frequently accompanying him on his military campaigns in Scotland and on the European continent. Philippa was shrewd and benefitted from being born and raised in a European commercial center. Her advice to Edward III was instrumental in advocating England's commercial expansion and she is credited with establishing the textile industry in the city of Norwich. Queen Philippa was invested in 1358 as a Lady of the Order of the Garter, an order of chivalry founded by her husband. While at Windsor Castle she died on August 15, 1369 and was widely mourned, by her husband, her family, and the people of England.

English Queen Consort. She was the daughter of Guillaume I, Comte de Hainault, referred to as "the Good," and his wife, Jeanne de Valois, a sister of Philip VI, King of France. Philippa was betrothed at the age of thirteen to the future King Edward III of England, cementing an alliance between her homeland and England, but also between her father and Edward III's mother, Isabella of France, in support of Isabella's efforts to seize the throne from her husband, King Edward II. They were officially married at York Minster on January 24, 1328, less than one year after Edward III had been crowned following the deposition of his father, King Edward II. A papal dispensation had been required as they were second cousins, both being great-grandchildren of King Philip III of France. She was crowned as queen consort on February 18, 1330 at Westminster Abbey while pregnant with her first child, Edward, Prince of Wales, more commonly known as Edward the Black Prince. Philippa was admired as a model queen and stood in stark contrast to her scheming mother-in-law, Dowager Queen Isabella, widow of King Edward II. She was admired for her gentleness, which was shown famously in an incident that occurred at Calais. Following the English victory at the Battle of Crécy, Edward III had laid siege to Calais (September 4, 1346-August 3, 1347). The city had been ordered by King Philip VI of France to hold out and not surrender, but starvation forced them to do so. Jean Froissart, a contemporary chronicler, recorded that Edward offered to spare the citizens of Calais in exchange for the surrender of six burghers, who were directed to wear nooses around their necks and carry the keys to the city with them. The burghers fully expected their lives to be forfeit, but Philippa intervened with her husband and convinced him to show mercy, sparing their lives. Conversely, she could show great bravery and martial zeal when necessary. Acting as regent for Edward III while he was on a military campaign in France, she repelled a Scottish invasion of England which had been made at the behest of their French allies, assembling an army and confronting the Scots at the Battle of Neville's Cross on October 17, 1346, half a mile west of Durham, England. Philippa rallied the English soldiers while on horseback prior to the battle and it proved to be a resounding English victory in which the Scottish king, David II, was taken prisoner. She demonstrated her loyalty to her husband by frequently accompanying him on his military campaigns in Scotland and on the European continent. Philippa was shrewd and benefitted from being born and raised in a European commercial center. Her advice to Edward III was instrumental in advocating England's commercial expansion and she is credited with establishing the textile industry in the city of Norwich. Queen Philippa was invested in 1358 as a Lady of the Order of the Garter, an order of chivalry founded by her husband. While at Windsor Castle she died on August 15, 1369 and was widely mourned, by her husband, her family, and the people of England.

Bio by: CMWJR


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: Kristen Conrad
  • Added: 1 Feb 2004
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 8341702
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8341702/philippa-d'avesnes_of_hainault: accessed ), memorial page for Philippa d'Avesnes of Hainault (24 Jun 1313–14 Aug 1369), Find a Grave Memorial ID 8341702, citing Westminster Abbey, Westminster, City of Westminster, Greater London, England; Maintained by Find a Grave.