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Sgt Edwin Stillman Bliss

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Sgt Edwin Stillman Bliss

Birth
Little Genesee, Allegany County, New York, USA
Death
6 Jul 1911 (aged 75)
Alfred, Allegany County, New York, USA
Burial
Alfred, Allegany County, New York, USA GPS-Latitude: 42.2682004, Longitude: -77.7789291
Memorial ID
View Source
Civil War Veteran
Commissary Sgt. Edwin Stillman Bliss
136th New York Infantry

Adjutant General:
Bliss, Edwin S--Age, 26 years. Enlisted, August 14, 1862, at Clarksville, to serve three years; mustered in as corporal, Co. A, September 26, 1862; transferred to Sixteenth Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps, January 9, 1864; promoted commissary sergeant, no date; mustered out, July 3, 1865, at Harrisburg, Pa.
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Suffered injury to abdoman
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Occupation: farmer
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Married Sarah M. Humphrey
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Sabbath Recorder
August 19, 1911

In Memory of Edwin Stillman Bliss.

Edwin S. Bliss was born in Little Genesee, June 15, 1836, and died July 6, 1911, in Alfred, N. Y., after a gradual decline for about three years, aged 75 years and 21 days.
He was the son of Ebenezer David and Martha (Boss) Bliss. They reared eight children, only one of whom is now living - Mrs. Abby W. Berry of Independence, N. Y. The youngest of the family died in the US army during the Civil War in 1862. Brother Bliss' mother was the daughter of William Boss, who was the son of Joseph Boss, born in 1732 and died in 1807. His father, Ebenezer David, was the son of Thomas Ward Bliss, who was the son of Rev. William Bliss of Newport, RI. The latter held a captain's commission in the French War, which terminated with the disbanding of the troops in 1763.
He was ordained in 1779 and from about that time to his death in 1808, he was the efficient and much-loved pastor of the first Seventh-day Baptist church in America, which was located at Newport. He had two sons, Arnold and John who were ordained as evangelists. Elder William Bliss also had a grandson, William B. Maxson, who became a prominent minister in the Seventh-day Baptist Denomination and an editor of the Seventh-day Baptist Missionary Magazine, the publication of which was proposed by him at the conference in 1820. Elder William Bliss was the son of Josiah Bliss, who was a member of the Seventh-day Baptist church of Newport and it is believed that he was the son of John and Damaris Arnold Bliss. Damaris was also a member of the Seventh-day Baptist church of Newport and a daughter of Governor Arnold, who speaks of her in his will, dated 1677, and 'gives to his daughter, Damaris Bliss, wife of John Bliss, a parcel of land in the precincts of Newport'.
We see the blood of the early pioneers of New England and of Seventh-day Baptists, largely coursed in Brother Bliss' veins and we could reasonably expect to find in him a patriotic citizen, a Seventh-day Baptist Christian, and an industrious, hard laborer, with the strong mechanical tendencies which were early manifested by him in the use of tools.
When about fourteen years of age he was baptized by Rev. James Bailey, the pastor of the Seventh-day Baptist church of Little Genesee.
His education was largely obtained in the district school , and at Alfred Academy, during 1856-1858. In the meantime, he taught at Stanard's Corners, Alfred Station, and later at Bolivar.
In September 1861, he was married to Sarah M. Humphrey, and they only lacked until next September of completing fifty years of wedded life. In the spring of '62, they settled on a farm in the town of Clarksville, just over the line from the town of Genesee. In August of the same year, very soon after the death of his brother William in the United States' service, he responded to the call of President Lincoln for more troops and enlisted in the 136th Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. After a year of service, he was, on account of ill health, transferred to the 16th Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps. For some time he was commissary sergeant. He was honorably discharged July 2, 1865, having served his country two years, ten months, and nineteen days.
Returning home he came to Richburg and opened a grocery store, August 15, 1865. While living here, four children came to cheer their home: Myrta Stella Bassett, of Alfred, Edna Alice, a teacher at Suffern, N. Y., Edwin LeRue, electrical machinist, Lynn, Mass., and Theron Coit, a dentist, Dalton, N. Y.
The sixteen years of Brother Bliss' residence at Richburg were years of active labor in the Seventh-day Baptist church of which he and his wife became members, and where he was an able counselor and generous contributor in its social, religious, and financial activities. He was superintendent of the Sabbath school ten years, and in this capacity he manifested great zeal and aptness. Nothing seemed too good for the school, and it was greatly strengthened and interested by his novel devices and plans in its behalf.
In society and business he was a moving spirit. He was interested in various manufacturing interests, as well as some farming and finally in the oil business. With others, he leased 1,000 acres of land in the vicinity and put down the oil well that opened up the Richburg oil field, which in a few days transformed the quiet little village of Richburg into a thriving, hustling oil center.
About this time Mr. Bliss' long felt desire to see the children in the Sabbath schools and others of the denomination provided with a good weekly Sabbath school paper, was made possible of realization by a generous gift of an oil lease, which Brother and Sister Bliss donated for this purpose.
This was given in the autumn of '81, and the next March Our Sabbath Visitor was launched, and continued under different editors for twenty years, a helpful, efficient and purely Christian periodical, sowing its good seed for a number of years in the fertile soil of young hearts. In 1902 it became The Sabbath Visitor of the present day.
Mr. Bliss was a trustee of Alfred University for some years, and while in Richburg a member of the Cassius Maxson GAR Post of that place, but after coming to Alfred he became a member of the B. Frank Maxson GAR Post No. 428.
Our brother, a radical temperance man, became in the early days of the prohibition movement a strong Prohibitionist, and was faithful and loyal to his party to the end.
As long as it was possible, he industriously attended to business. But whether in prosperity or adversity he sought to obey Christ's command, 'Seek first the kingdom of heaven and its righteousness.' During his long sickness, when strength of body and mind and earthly accumulations had largely forsaken him, still one object and hope remained and he pressed 'toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus,' and thus entered into his reward.
We think of him as a stalwart man, a fearless believer, a devoted husband, and loving father who in the weakness and infirmities of age, has lain off the militant uniform and gone to report to the Chief Captain and receive his new commission in the heavenly host.
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Civil War Veteran
Commissary Sgt. Edwin Stillman Bliss
136th New York Infantry

Adjutant General:
Bliss, Edwin S--Age, 26 years. Enlisted, August 14, 1862, at Clarksville, to serve three years; mustered in as corporal, Co. A, September 26, 1862; transferred to Sixteenth Regiment, Veteran Reserve Corps, January 9, 1864; promoted commissary sergeant, no date; mustered out, July 3, 1865, at Harrisburg, Pa.
--------------
Suffered injury to abdoman
--------------
Occupation: farmer
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Married Sarah M. Humphrey
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Sabbath Recorder
August 19, 1911

In Memory of Edwin Stillman Bliss.

Edwin S. Bliss was born in Little Genesee, June 15, 1836, and died July 6, 1911, in Alfred, N. Y., after a gradual decline for about three years, aged 75 years and 21 days.
He was the son of Ebenezer David and Martha (Boss) Bliss. They reared eight children, only one of whom is now living - Mrs. Abby W. Berry of Independence, N. Y. The youngest of the family died in the US army during the Civil War in 1862. Brother Bliss' mother was the daughter of William Boss, who was the son of Joseph Boss, born in 1732 and died in 1807. His father, Ebenezer David, was the son of Thomas Ward Bliss, who was the son of Rev. William Bliss of Newport, RI. The latter held a captain's commission in the French War, which terminated with the disbanding of the troops in 1763.
He was ordained in 1779 and from about that time to his death in 1808, he was the efficient and much-loved pastor of the first Seventh-day Baptist church in America, which was located at Newport. He had two sons, Arnold and John who were ordained as evangelists. Elder William Bliss also had a grandson, William B. Maxson, who became a prominent minister in the Seventh-day Baptist Denomination and an editor of the Seventh-day Baptist Missionary Magazine, the publication of which was proposed by him at the conference in 1820. Elder William Bliss was the son of Josiah Bliss, who was a member of the Seventh-day Baptist church of Newport and it is believed that he was the son of John and Damaris Arnold Bliss. Damaris was also a member of the Seventh-day Baptist church of Newport and a daughter of Governor Arnold, who speaks of her in his will, dated 1677, and 'gives to his daughter, Damaris Bliss, wife of John Bliss, a parcel of land in the precincts of Newport'.
We see the blood of the early pioneers of New England and of Seventh-day Baptists, largely coursed in Brother Bliss' veins and we could reasonably expect to find in him a patriotic citizen, a Seventh-day Baptist Christian, and an industrious, hard laborer, with the strong mechanical tendencies which were early manifested by him in the use of tools.
When about fourteen years of age he was baptized by Rev. James Bailey, the pastor of the Seventh-day Baptist church of Little Genesee.
His education was largely obtained in the district school , and at Alfred Academy, during 1856-1858. In the meantime, he taught at Stanard's Corners, Alfred Station, and later at Bolivar.
In September 1861, he was married to Sarah M. Humphrey, and they only lacked until next September of completing fifty years of wedded life. In the spring of '62, they settled on a farm in the town of Clarksville, just over the line from the town of Genesee. In August of the same year, very soon after the death of his brother William in the United States' service, he responded to the call of President Lincoln for more troops and enlisted in the 136th Regiment, N. Y. State Volunteers. After a year of service, he was, on account of ill health, transferred to the 16th Regiment Veteran Reserve Corps. For some time he was commissary sergeant. He was honorably discharged July 2, 1865, having served his country two years, ten months, and nineteen days.
Returning home he came to Richburg and opened a grocery store, August 15, 1865. While living here, four children came to cheer their home: Myrta Stella Bassett, of Alfred, Edna Alice, a teacher at Suffern, N. Y., Edwin LeRue, electrical machinist, Lynn, Mass., and Theron Coit, a dentist, Dalton, N. Y.
The sixteen years of Brother Bliss' residence at Richburg were years of active labor in the Seventh-day Baptist church of which he and his wife became members, and where he was an able counselor and generous contributor in its social, religious, and financial activities. He was superintendent of the Sabbath school ten years, and in this capacity he manifested great zeal and aptness. Nothing seemed too good for the school, and it was greatly strengthened and interested by his novel devices and plans in its behalf.
In society and business he was a moving spirit. He was interested in various manufacturing interests, as well as some farming and finally in the oil business. With others, he leased 1,000 acres of land in the vicinity and put down the oil well that opened up the Richburg oil field, which in a few days transformed the quiet little village of Richburg into a thriving, hustling oil center.
About this time Mr. Bliss' long felt desire to see the children in the Sabbath schools and others of the denomination provided with a good weekly Sabbath school paper, was made possible of realization by a generous gift of an oil lease, which Brother and Sister Bliss donated for this purpose.
This was given in the autumn of '81, and the next March Our Sabbath Visitor was launched, and continued under different editors for twenty years, a helpful, efficient and purely Christian periodical, sowing its good seed for a number of years in the fertile soil of young hearts. In 1902 it became The Sabbath Visitor of the present day.
Mr. Bliss was a trustee of Alfred University for some years, and while in Richburg a member of the Cassius Maxson GAR Post of that place, but after coming to Alfred he became a member of the B. Frank Maxson GAR Post No. 428.
Our brother, a radical temperance man, became in the early days of the prohibition movement a strong Prohibitionist, and was faithful and loyal to his party to the end.
As long as it was possible, he industriously attended to business. But whether in prosperity or adversity he sought to obey Christ's command, 'Seek first the kingdom of heaven and its righteousness.' During his long sickness, when strength of body and mind and earthly accumulations had largely forsaken him, still one object and hope remained and he pressed 'toward the mark for the prize of the high calling of God in Christ Jesus,' and thus entered into his reward.
We think of him as a stalwart man, a fearless believer, a devoted husband, and loving father who in the weakness and infirmities of age, has lain off the militant uniform and gone to report to the Chief Captain and receive his new commission in the heavenly host.
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