Advertisement

William Diamond

Advertisement

William Diamond Veteran

Birth
Boston, Suffolk County, Massachusetts, USA
Death
29 Jul 1828 (aged 73)
Peterborough, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA
Burial
Peterborough, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA GPS-Latitude: 42.8801112, Longitude: -71.937703
Memorial ID
View Source
Died at age 73. Daughters of The American Revolution (DAR): Ancestor #A032263
A Revolutionary War drummer at Lexington and Bunker Hill.
Here is the rest of the story Samuel Adams and John Hancock were wanted men. In mid-April of 1775, they were secreted away in the parsonage of Rev. Jonas Clarke in Lexington, Massachusetts while on their way to Philadelphia and the Second Continental Congress, which was to convene on May 10 of that year. General Thomas Gage, the British commander in Boston, had two reasons for marching westward toward Lexington. One was to capture a supply of arms and powder that his spies had told him might be there. He was more confident that arms would be found farther down the road in Concord. He also wanted to seize Adams and Hancock. On the evening of April 18, he sent his army across the Charles River to begin the long march. Paul Revere had arranged for signals to be briefly displayed in the bell-tower of Boston's Old North Church and the local Sons of Liberty recognized that two lanterns meant that Gage's troops were to cross the river. Revere was already on the other side, in Charlestown, when he heard the news. He began to give the alarm as he rode through Medford and Menotomy (now Arlington) and other small villages along the way. On orders from Dr. Joseph Warren, a leader of the Sons of Liberty, William Dawes took the longer route through Boston Neck, shouting to everyone within earshot, "The Regulars are out!" After meeting Dawes in Menotomy, Revere entered Lexington only a few minutes ahead of his comrade, quickly warning Hancock and Adams. Dr. Samuel Prescott, courting a young lady in Lexington (Lydia Mulliken), decided to join the other two in riding on to Concord, where another cache of arms was stored. On their way to Concord, the intrepid trio soon encountered a roadblock manned by 4 British soldiers and tried to overpower them by riding through them. Prescott and his steed jumped a stone wall and escaped. Dawes and Revere both regained their freedom, but their success was extremely short-lived. They were soon confronted by 6 Regulars at another roadblock. While Revere was being arrested, Dawes escaped again and returned to Lexington. After his fortunate escape, Dr. Prescott went on to notify the residents of Concord of what was happening. The church bell was rung and the militia met on Lexington Common to the beat of 16 year-old William Diamond's drum (born July 20, 1758) and the peal of 17 year-old Jonathan Harrington's fife. Captain John Parker assembled the men of the town and there they waited in dawn's early light for their appointment with destiny. While they waited, the fifer and drummer played tunes that the men all knew and some of them sang along.

In June, 1775, Diamond led the Lexington militia to the Battle of Bunker Hill (Breed's Hill). He later became a foot soldier and served for the duration of the war. He was present at the British surrender at Yorktown. He died on July 29, 1828 and is buried in Petersborough, New Hampshire. The fife playing Harrington is not to be confused with his cousin, also Jonathan Harrington of about age 30, who was mortally wounded in the first British volley and died in the arms of his wife on his doorstep. The younger Harrington was the last survivor of the Battle of Lexington and died in 1854. A straggling handful perhaps forty in all of Massachusetts farmers answered the call of William Diamond's drum. Some of them were experienced fighters, veterans of the bloody French and Indians Wars, well versed in guerrilla tactics and undercover fighting. But they were no match for the seven hundred gleaming, handsomely uniformed British regulars bearing down on the small green meadow known as Lexington Common. The minutemen's historic stand against the cream of General Gage's Boston occupation army has become a legend, the subject of innumerable songs and poems an American
"Thermopylae." What happened that April morning on Lexington Common
and, a few hours later, at Concord Bridge and the dramatic events which preceded and followed the two battles all this is revealed in Arthur Bernon Tourtellot's fully documented, fascinating history.

In the clear chill of an early April morning in 1775, twenty-one
companies of picked British soldiers grenadiers, the tallest, most
heavily armed of infantrymen, traditionally the first to attack,
and light infantry, the agile flanking troops of the regiments
marched out from Boston across the softly rolling countryside of
Middlesex. After a restless night of alarms, counsels, musters and dismissals of militia, mysterious couriers, intelligence and counter-intelligence, a forty-five-year-old veteran of Rogers' Rangers in
the French and Indian wars, Captain John Parker, commanding the Lexington minutemen, directed his drummer boy to go across the road to the Common and beat the call to arms. And when William Diamond, bringing the enthusiasm of his sixteen years to the beating of his gaily emblazoned drum, rolled out the call to the village's minutemen, the War of the American Revolution began.

Everyone, including Captain Parker, knew where the British were headed: Concord, five miles to the west. To get there, the British regulars had to march right into Lexington's Common, a two-acre triangular patch that divided the road into two branches. As William Diamond continued to beat the call on his drum, the Lexington minutemen perhaps thirty of them assembled on the Common. Captain Parker directed Orderly Sergeant William Munroe to form the men in ranks. Eventually Captain Parker had thirty-eight men strung out
thinly in one line and in part of a second. "I was stationed about
in the centre of the company," said Sylvanus Wood. "While we
were standing, I left my place and went from one end of the
company to the other, and counted every man who was paraded,
and the whole number was thirty-eight and no more."

The rolling beat of William Diamond's drum began to drown out, in the ears of the approaching British, the soft thud of their own marching feet on the unpaved roadway. Aware that the drum was sounding a military assembly, the British officers halted their
troops, the light infantry in front and the grenadiers in the rear.
Orders were given to stop, prime and load their guns, double their
ranks, and then to proceed again at double-quick time. All the elements of an inevitable, if ludicrously one-sided, battle were now present in almost geometric simplicity: a little band of armed yeomen, their number perhaps swelled into the forties now, stood in one and a half straggly rows, their guns primed and loaded; up the road, headed toward them on the double, came several hundred soldiers, their guns also primed and loaded. Now this was an odd situation, a suicidal situation, for Captain Parker and his minutemen all of them hard and practical men to get themselves into.
First of all, the British threat in itself did not call for a
Thermopylaean stand. The British soldiers represented about one
sixth of the strength of General Gage's peacetime occupation army
garrisoned in Boston. The little army had been stationed there for
nearly a full year all through the summer of 1774 and the re-markably mild winter of 1774-75; in all that time they had molested no one, destroyed no property. Except for the kind of minor and isolated encounters common between townspeople and the military in garrison towns a taunting remark, a drunken argument, a dispute over a woman the occupation was wholly peaceful.
(contributed by David Bruty 3 46939293)
Died at age 73. Daughters of The American Revolution (DAR): Ancestor #A032263
A Revolutionary War drummer at Lexington and Bunker Hill.
Here is the rest of the story Samuel Adams and John Hancock were wanted men. In mid-April of 1775, they were secreted away in the parsonage of Rev. Jonas Clarke in Lexington, Massachusetts while on their way to Philadelphia and the Second Continental Congress, which was to convene on May 10 of that year. General Thomas Gage, the British commander in Boston, had two reasons for marching westward toward Lexington. One was to capture a supply of arms and powder that his spies had told him might be there. He was more confident that arms would be found farther down the road in Concord. He also wanted to seize Adams and Hancock. On the evening of April 18, he sent his army across the Charles River to begin the long march. Paul Revere had arranged for signals to be briefly displayed in the bell-tower of Boston's Old North Church and the local Sons of Liberty recognized that two lanterns meant that Gage's troops were to cross the river. Revere was already on the other side, in Charlestown, when he heard the news. He began to give the alarm as he rode through Medford and Menotomy (now Arlington) and other small villages along the way. On orders from Dr. Joseph Warren, a leader of the Sons of Liberty, William Dawes took the longer route through Boston Neck, shouting to everyone within earshot, "The Regulars are out!" After meeting Dawes in Menotomy, Revere entered Lexington only a few minutes ahead of his comrade, quickly warning Hancock and Adams. Dr. Samuel Prescott, courting a young lady in Lexington (Lydia Mulliken), decided to join the other two in riding on to Concord, where another cache of arms was stored. On their way to Concord, the intrepid trio soon encountered a roadblock manned by 4 British soldiers and tried to overpower them by riding through them. Prescott and his steed jumped a stone wall and escaped. Dawes and Revere both regained their freedom, but their success was extremely short-lived. They were soon confronted by 6 Regulars at another roadblock. While Revere was being arrested, Dawes escaped again and returned to Lexington. After his fortunate escape, Dr. Prescott went on to notify the residents of Concord of what was happening. The church bell was rung and the militia met on Lexington Common to the beat of 16 year-old William Diamond's drum (born July 20, 1758) and the peal of 17 year-old Jonathan Harrington's fife. Captain John Parker assembled the men of the town and there they waited in dawn's early light for their appointment with destiny. While they waited, the fifer and drummer played tunes that the men all knew and some of them sang along.

In June, 1775, Diamond led the Lexington militia to the Battle of Bunker Hill (Breed's Hill). He later became a foot soldier and served for the duration of the war. He was present at the British surrender at Yorktown. He died on July 29, 1828 and is buried in Petersborough, New Hampshire. The fife playing Harrington is not to be confused with his cousin, also Jonathan Harrington of about age 30, who was mortally wounded in the first British volley and died in the arms of his wife on his doorstep. The younger Harrington was the last survivor of the Battle of Lexington and died in 1854. A straggling handful perhaps forty in all of Massachusetts farmers answered the call of William Diamond's drum. Some of them were experienced fighters, veterans of the bloody French and Indians Wars, well versed in guerrilla tactics and undercover fighting. But they were no match for the seven hundred gleaming, handsomely uniformed British regulars bearing down on the small green meadow known as Lexington Common. The minutemen's historic stand against the cream of General Gage's Boston occupation army has become a legend, the subject of innumerable songs and poems an American
"Thermopylae." What happened that April morning on Lexington Common
and, a few hours later, at Concord Bridge and the dramatic events which preceded and followed the two battles all this is revealed in Arthur Bernon Tourtellot's fully documented, fascinating history.

In the clear chill of an early April morning in 1775, twenty-one
companies of picked British soldiers grenadiers, the tallest, most
heavily armed of infantrymen, traditionally the first to attack,
and light infantry, the agile flanking troops of the regiments
marched out from Boston across the softly rolling countryside of
Middlesex. After a restless night of alarms, counsels, musters and dismissals of militia, mysterious couriers, intelligence and counter-intelligence, a forty-five-year-old veteran of Rogers' Rangers in
the French and Indian wars, Captain John Parker, commanding the Lexington minutemen, directed his drummer boy to go across the road to the Common and beat the call to arms. And when William Diamond, bringing the enthusiasm of his sixteen years to the beating of his gaily emblazoned drum, rolled out the call to the village's minutemen, the War of the American Revolution began.

Everyone, including Captain Parker, knew where the British were headed: Concord, five miles to the west. To get there, the British regulars had to march right into Lexington's Common, a two-acre triangular patch that divided the road into two branches. As William Diamond continued to beat the call on his drum, the Lexington minutemen perhaps thirty of them assembled on the Common. Captain Parker directed Orderly Sergeant William Munroe to form the men in ranks. Eventually Captain Parker had thirty-eight men strung out
thinly in one line and in part of a second. "I was stationed about
in the centre of the company," said Sylvanus Wood. "While we
were standing, I left my place and went from one end of the
company to the other, and counted every man who was paraded,
and the whole number was thirty-eight and no more."

The rolling beat of William Diamond's drum began to drown out, in the ears of the approaching British, the soft thud of their own marching feet on the unpaved roadway. Aware that the drum was sounding a military assembly, the British officers halted their
troops, the light infantry in front and the grenadiers in the rear.
Orders were given to stop, prime and load their guns, double their
ranks, and then to proceed again at double-quick time. All the elements of an inevitable, if ludicrously one-sided, battle were now present in almost geometric simplicity: a little band of armed yeomen, their number perhaps swelled into the forties now, stood in one and a half straggly rows, their guns primed and loaded; up the road, headed toward them on the double, came several hundred soldiers, their guns also primed and loaded. Now this was an odd situation, a suicidal situation, for Captain Parker and his minutemen all of them hard and practical men to get themselves into.
First of all, the British threat in itself did not call for a
Thermopylaean stand. The British soldiers represented about one
sixth of the strength of General Gage's peacetime occupation army
garrisoned in Boston. The little army had been stationed there for
nearly a full year all through the summer of 1774 and the re-markably mild winter of 1774-75; in all that time they had molested no one, destroyed no property. Except for the kind of minor and isolated encounters common between townspeople and the military in garrison towns a taunting remark, a drunken argument, a dispute over a woman the occupation was wholly peaceful.
(contributed by David Bruty 3 46939293)


Advertisement

  • Maintained by: Becky Gardipee Relative Grandchild
  • Originally Created by: Kevin Murphy
  • Added: Nov 12, 2003
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/8079381/william-diamond: accessed ), memorial page for William Diamond (21 Jul 1755–29 Jul 1828), Find a Grave Memorial ID 8079381, citing Old Street Cemetery, Peterborough, Hillsborough County, New Hampshire, USA; Maintained by Becky Gardipee (contributor 48707574).