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Archibald Alexander Hill

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Archibald Alexander Hill

Birth
Anchorage, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA
Death
25 Nov 1907 (aged 36)
San Diego, San Diego County, California, USA
Burial
Louisville, Jefferson County, Kentucky, USA Add to Map
Plot
Section G Lot 98 Grave 6
Memorial ID
View Source
THE COURIER-JOURNAL, LOUISVILLE, KY., SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1907
Funeral services for Archibald Hill will be held at 2 o'clock this afternoon at the home of his mother, Mrs. Martha J. Hill, 1109 Second street. The body of Mr. Hill, who died in San Diego, Cal., was brought to Louisville last night and taken to the home of his mother. The services this afternoon, both at the residence and at the grave in Cave Hill cemetery, will be private. This is owing to the recent serious illness of Mrs. Hill and the strain during the long period of waiting while the body was being brought to Louisville.
The Rev. Dr. Charles R. Hemphill, assisted by the Rev. Dr. Egbert Watson Smith, pastor of the Second Presbyterian church, and the Rev. Dr. J. Watson Graybill, pastor of the Westminister Presbyterian church, will conduct the services. Pallbearers selected are: Charles F. Huhlein, J. B. Judah, H. John Dolan, Adger Stewart and August Schachner.

DEATH OF ARCHIBALD HILL
The death of Archibald Alexander Hill marks the passing of a great man from our midst. He burned out his life in service for his brother - man. His keen appreciation of the fact that all men are related by the very condition of life, spurred him to bend every righteous force toward a amelloration of that condition. He laid down his life as a tribute to his zeal for social betterment. His real heartfelt brotherhood knew no limit of class, caste or creed - no condescension or patronage.
He sounded the keynote of the new social thought eleven years ago, when he dedicated his services to Neighborhood House, which had its beginning in two rooms of an old saloon building at Preston and Jefferson streets. The sympathy, love and enthusiasm sown then has grown, and the house on First street stands as a monument to his memory to-day.
In 1899, when New York called him, he took charge of the West Side Neighborhood House. Two years later he married Miss Mary Dorsey Anderson, and together they devoted their lives to the social problems of New York. One son was born to them.
In 1904 Mr. Hill became secretary of the Tenement-house Committee of the Charity Organization Society, and in the same year wisely administered the $100,000 relief fund raised for the benefit of the families of those killed and injured in the burning of the excursion steamer Gen. Slocum.
Last week at the twenty-fifth anniversary meeting of the Charity Organization Society, Mayor McClellan in his address testified to his appreciation of Mr. Hill's able handling of that difficult situation.
In 1906 Mr. Hill was secretary to the Mayor's committee for the investigation of the pushcart problem, and from 1905 to 1907 he was secretary of the Metropolitan Parks Association. In this capacity he was instrumental in the city's acquiring cheap seaside parks, on the outskirts of which recuperative hospitals are to be built, in order that thousands of the convalescents forced to leave too soon in order to make room so others may have a place, where they may fully regain their strength before resuming their duties.
He was a charter member of the Executive Committee of the Playground Association of America, and a member of the New York State and National Conference of Charities and Corrections, the Association of Neighborhood Workers, the Tenement Shade Tree Committee, the Board of Managers of the People's Symphony Concerts, the American Civic Association and a departmental editor of Cahrities and Commons.
His capacity for work and his wonderful personality made it possible for him to accomplish in thirty-six years what few men can do in three score and ten.
Frances Ingram.
THE COURIER-JOURNAL, LOUISVILLE, KY., SUNDAY, DECEMBER 1, 1907
Funeral services for Archibald Hill will be held at 2 o'clock this afternoon at the home of his mother, Mrs. Martha J. Hill, 1109 Second street. The body of Mr. Hill, who died in San Diego, Cal., was brought to Louisville last night and taken to the home of his mother. The services this afternoon, both at the residence and at the grave in Cave Hill cemetery, will be private. This is owing to the recent serious illness of Mrs. Hill and the strain during the long period of waiting while the body was being brought to Louisville.
The Rev. Dr. Charles R. Hemphill, assisted by the Rev. Dr. Egbert Watson Smith, pastor of the Second Presbyterian church, and the Rev. Dr. J. Watson Graybill, pastor of the Westminister Presbyterian church, will conduct the services. Pallbearers selected are: Charles F. Huhlein, J. B. Judah, H. John Dolan, Adger Stewart and August Schachner.

DEATH OF ARCHIBALD HILL
The death of Archibald Alexander Hill marks the passing of a great man from our midst. He burned out his life in service for his brother - man. His keen appreciation of the fact that all men are related by the very condition of life, spurred him to bend every righteous force toward a amelloration of that condition. He laid down his life as a tribute to his zeal for social betterment. His real heartfelt brotherhood knew no limit of class, caste or creed - no condescension or patronage.
He sounded the keynote of the new social thought eleven years ago, when he dedicated his services to Neighborhood House, which had its beginning in two rooms of an old saloon building at Preston and Jefferson streets. The sympathy, love and enthusiasm sown then has grown, and the house on First street stands as a monument to his memory to-day.
In 1899, when New York called him, he took charge of the West Side Neighborhood House. Two years later he married Miss Mary Dorsey Anderson, and together they devoted their lives to the social problems of New York. One son was born to them.
In 1904 Mr. Hill became secretary of the Tenement-house Committee of the Charity Organization Society, and in the same year wisely administered the $100,000 relief fund raised for the benefit of the families of those killed and injured in the burning of the excursion steamer Gen. Slocum.
Last week at the twenty-fifth anniversary meeting of the Charity Organization Society, Mayor McClellan in his address testified to his appreciation of Mr. Hill's able handling of that difficult situation.
In 1906 Mr. Hill was secretary to the Mayor's committee for the investigation of the pushcart problem, and from 1905 to 1907 he was secretary of the Metropolitan Parks Association. In this capacity he was instrumental in the city's acquiring cheap seaside parks, on the outskirts of which recuperative hospitals are to be built, in order that thousands of the convalescents forced to leave too soon in order to make room so others may have a place, where they may fully regain their strength before resuming their duties.
He was a charter member of the Executive Committee of the Playground Association of America, and a member of the New York State and National Conference of Charities and Corrections, the Association of Neighborhood Workers, the Tenement Shade Tree Committee, the Board of Managers of the People's Symphony Concerts, the American Civic Association and a departmental editor of Cahrities and Commons.
His capacity for work and his wonderful personality made it possible for him to accomplish in thirty-six years what few men can do in three score and ten.
Frances Ingram.


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