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Bonnie Elizabeth Parker

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Bonnie Elizabeth Parker Famous memorial

Birth
Rowena, Runnels County, Texas, USA
Death
23 May 1934 (aged 23)
Gibsland, Bienville Parish, Louisiana, USA
Burial
Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, USA GPS-Latitude: 32.8674176, Longitude: -96.8639119
Memorial ID
View Source
Alleged Criminal, American Folk Figure. She made an American legend of herself when she joined with her boyfriend Clyde Barrow to commit robberies and murders in the American Southwest between 1931 and 1934. Their exploits became highly captivating to the American public, and after their deaths, they have become preserved in American lore as "Bonnie and Clyde." Born the middle child and oldest daughter of a laboring family, her mother moved the family to the West Dallas area called "Cement City" after the death of her father in 1914. In her youth, she was known for being kind, an honor student and a poet, as well as other creative writing endeavors. By sixteen, she was a high school dropout, and in 1926, she married high-school sweetheart Roy Thornton. Despite the rocky and sometimes abusive marriage and Roy's imprisonment in 1929, she remained married to him until she died. To support herself, she worked as a waitress. She became friends with future Dallas County sheriff deputy Ted Hinton, who would ironically be a member of the posse that would ambush her and Barrow. She met Clyde Barrow in 1930 through his sister and it was love at first sight. Shortly after, he was arrested and sentenced to a prison term. She smuggled a gun into the prison to help him escape, which he did, but he was rearrested and sent back to prison. She decided to join him in his criminal activities after his release on parole two years later. Over a two-year period, the couple was credited with killing at least twelve people, including nine law enforcement officers in three different states, in addition to a host of robberies and auto thefts. Although their time of crime was exciting and romantic to her, she was seriously injured with a third-degree burn on her thigh in an auto accident during an escape. After their notorious crime sprees, they were eventually stopped when a posse of six law enforcement officials ambushed their car, and after Barrow pulled his gun, the couple were killed in a hail of bullets not too far away from their Louisiana hideout. Before her death, she sent the reporters her infamous "Story of Bonnie and Clyde," which was published. She was never a convicted criminal. The 1967 film "Bonnie and Clyde," starring Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty, portrays a glamorous version, whereas the 2019 version, the "Highwaymen" starring Kevin Costner, portrays a more realistic version.
Alleged Criminal, American Folk Figure. She made an American legend of herself when she joined with her boyfriend Clyde Barrow to commit robberies and murders in the American Southwest between 1931 and 1934. Their exploits became highly captivating to the American public, and after their deaths, they have become preserved in American lore as "Bonnie and Clyde." Born the middle child and oldest daughter of a laboring family, her mother moved the family to the West Dallas area called "Cement City" after the death of her father in 1914. In her youth, she was known for being kind, an honor student and a poet, as well as other creative writing endeavors. By sixteen, she was a high school dropout, and in 1926, she married high-school sweetheart Roy Thornton. Despite the rocky and sometimes abusive marriage and Roy's imprisonment in 1929, she remained married to him until she died. To support herself, she worked as a waitress. She became friends with future Dallas County sheriff deputy Ted Hinton, who would ironically be a member of the posse that would ambush her and Barrow. She met Clyde Barrow in 1930 through his sister and it was love at first sight. Shortly after, he was arrested and sentenced to a prison term. She smuggled a gun into the prison to help him escape, which he did, but he was rearrested and sent back to prison. She decided to join him in his criminal activities after his release on parole two years later. Over a two-year period, the couple was credited with killing at least twelve people, including nine law enforcement officers in three different states, in addition to a host of robberies and auto thefts. Although their time of crime was exciting and romantic to her, she was seriously injured with a third-degree burn on her thigh in an auto accident during an escape. After their notorious crime sprees, they were eventually stopped when a posse of six law enforcement officials ambushed their car, and after Barrow pulled his gun, the couple were killed in a hail of bullets not too far away from their Louisiana hideout. Before her death, she sent the reporters her infamous "Story of Bonnie and Clyde," which was published. She was never a convicted criminal. The 1967 film "Bonnie and Clyde," starring Faye Dunaway and Warren Beatty, portrays a glamorous version, whereas the 2019 version, the "Highwaymen" starring Kevin Costner, portrays a more realistic version.

Bio by: Linda Davis


Inscription

As The Flowers Are All Made Sweeter By
The Sunshine And The Dew, So This Old
World Is Made Brighter By The Lives
Of Folks Like You.



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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Added: Apr 25, 1998
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID:
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/791/bonnie_elizabeth-parker: accessed ), memorial page for Bonnie Elizabeth Parker (1 Oct 1910–23 May 1934), Find a Grave Memorial ID 791, citing Crown Hill Memorial Park, Dallas, Dallas County, Texas, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.