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 Maude Eburne

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Maude Eburne Famous memorial

Birth
Ontario, Canada
Death
15 Oct 1960 (aged 84)
Hollywood, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Burial
Cremated, Ashes given to family or friend
Memorial ID
7901275 View Source

Actress. She is best remembered for her portrayal of the sarcastic Aunt Charlotte in "The Passionate Plumber" (1932). Born into a prominent theatrical family, she began her career on the stage appearing through stock companies within her native Canada and New York City, New York. While appearing in "Many a Slip", she was discovered by a talent scout who brought her out to California for some screen and vocal tests. Upon being reviewed by director Russell Mack, he was so impressed by her distinctive voice, mature appearance, and dark looks, he arranged for her to begin a career in the film industry beginning with her being under his supervision per a supporting role in "Lonely Wives" (1931). From there, she would go on to flourish as a notable character actress in over 115 feature films. Although, primarily cast as old maids and curmudgeons, she also was noted for performing as either a wife, mother, grandmother, white-collared worker, retail clerk, nanny, housekeeper, secretary, eccentric, or dowdy matron. She appeared in such feature films as "The Man in Possession" (1931), "Panama Flo" (1932), "The Vampire Bat" (1932), "Lazy River" (1934), "Ruggles of Red Gap" (1935), "Poppy" (1936), "Champaign Waltz" (1937), "Rivers of the Black Hills" (1938), "Undercover Agent" (1939), "Colorado" (1940), "They Meet Again" (1941), "To Be or Not to Be" (1942), "The Crystal Ball" (1943), "Bowery to Broadway" (1944), "Man from Oklahoma" (1945), "Mother Wore Tights" (1948), "Arson, Inc." (1949), and "Belle Le Grand" (1951). During her career, she was an honorary member of Actors Equity, was a member of the Screen Actors Guild, held dual citizenship between the United States and Canada, had been an active member of the Hollywood Democratic Committee, was a regular parishioner of the Episcopal church, had been a theatrical instructor for the Pasadena Playhouse, presided as a chairwoman for her local charters of the American Red Cross and the March of Dimes, and she was was married to fellow stage actor Eugene Johnson Hall from 1906 until his death in 1932 (their union produced one child). Upon her 1951 retirement, she spent the final years of her life being a generous benefactor for several libraries and state parks, as well as being focused on charitable and religious causes, until her death from the complications of undisclosed causes.

Actress. She is best remembered for her portrayal of the sarcastic Aunt Charlotte in "The Passionate Plumber" (1932). Born into a prominent theatrical family, she began her career on the stage appearing through stock companies within her native Canada and New York City, New York. While appearing in "Many a Slip", she was discovered by a talent scout who brought her out to California for some screen and vocal tests. Upon being reviewed by director Russell Mack, he was so impressed by her distinctive voice, mature appearance, and dark looks, he arranged for her to begin a career in the film industry beginning with her being under his supervision per a supporting role in "Lonely Wives" (1931). From there, she would go on to flourish as a notable character actress in over 115 feature films. Although, primarily cast as old maids and curmudgeons, she also was noted for performing as either a wife, mother, grandmother, white-collared worker, retail clerk, nanny, housekeeper, secretary, eccentric, or dowdy matron. She appeared in such feature films as "The Man in Possession" (1931), "Panama Flo" (1932), "The Vampire Bat" (1932), "Lazy River" (1934), "Ruggles of Red Gap" (1935), "Poppy" (1936), "Champaign Waltz" (1937), "Rivers of the Black Hills" (1938), "Undercover Agent" (1939), "Colorado" (1940), "They Meet Again" (1941), "To Be or Not to Be" (1942), "The Crystal Ball" (1943), "Bowery to Broadway" (1944), "Man from Oklahoma" (1945), "Mother Wore Tights" (1948), "Arson, Inc." (1949), and "Belle Le Grand" (1951). During her career, she was an honorary member of Actors Equity, was a member of the Screen Actors Guild, held dual citizenship between the United States and Canada, had been an active member of the Hollywood Democratic Committee, was a regular parishioner of the Episcopal church, had been a theatrical instructor for the Pasadena Playhouse, presided as a chairwoman for her local charters of the American Red Cross and the March of Dimes, and she was was married to fellow stage actor Eugene Johnson Hall from 1906 until his death in 1932 (their union produced one child). Upon her 1951 retirement, she spent the final years of her life being a generous benefactor for several libraries and state parks, as well as being focused on charitable and religious causes, until her death from the complications of undisclosed causes.

Bio by: Lowell Thurgood


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: TLS
  • Added: 25 Sep 2003
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 7901275
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/7901275/maude-eburne: accessed ), memorial page for Maude Eburne (10 Nov 1875–15 Oct 1960), Find a Grave Memorial ID 7901275, ; Maintained by Find a Grave Cremated, Ashes given to family or friend.