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George W. Allen

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George W. Allen Veteran

Birth
Adams County, Illinois, USA
Death
26 Jun 1911 (aged 67)
Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa, USA
Burial
Cedar Rapids, Linn County, Iowa, USA GPS-Latitude: 41.976781, Longitude: -91.6476167
Memorial ID
View Source
Civil War veteran Company A 20th Iowa Infantry Regiment. Enlisted Aug 2, 1862. Mustered Aug 22, 1862. Mustered out July 8, 1865 in Mobile, Alabama.

G. W. Allen

Outside of Cedar Rapids there are many progressive and energetic business men in Linn County who have met with excellent success in their undertakings, and are now quite wealthy. Among these is numbered G. W. Allen, a well-known merchant of Bertram. He was born in Adams county, Illinois, September 25, 1843, and is a son of Franklin and Rebecca (Myers) Allen. His father was born in Dresden, New York, April 15, 1818, and came west during the 30's. He assisted in building Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and was engaged in rafting down the Missouri river for a time in connection with a brother who was drowned while following that pursuit. Franklin Allen then went to Illinois, where he engaged in milling, and in that state he was married October 10, 1842, to Rebecca Myers, who was born in Richland county, Ohio, July 25, 1825. ©2005 Transcribed for the Project.

Subsequently they removed to Missouri, where he also followed milling until the Mexican war broke out. In 1846 he enlisted with five hundred others, and was in the service for sixteen months. He then returned to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he had left his family, and followed his chosen occupation there until the spring of 1852. Being a Mormon at that time, he, with a colony and train of forty wagons, went to Salt Lake City, Utah, where he made his home until 1857, when he returned to Iowa and settled in Cedar county. He operated a mill in that place for two years, and then came to Linn county, where he followed the same occupation near Bertram until 1862.

During that year he again entered the service of his country enlisting in Company A, Twentieth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, but was discharged fifteen months later on account of disability and returned to his home in this county. He subsequently had the misfortune to lose an arm in the machinery of Scott's mill, near Bertram, and then removed to Bertram and embarked in mercantile business. He remained a resident of that place until his death, which occured December 16, 1890, and he was laid to rest in Campbell's cemetery. During the latter part of his life he was a member of the Freewill Baptist Church, and was always a supporter of the men and measures of the Democratic party. His patriotism and loyalty were manifested by his service in two wars, and he was ever recognized as a valued citizen of his community. His estimable wife died February 16. 1885.

Unto them were born fourteen children, of whom G. W., our subject, is the oldest; Samuel, the next in order of birth, died in infancy; Matilda is the wife of Thompson Kountz, of Bertram township, this county; Franklin married Nancy Bickford and lives in Maquoketa, Iowa; Vina, deceased, was the wife of Peter Flanagan, of Oxford, Iowa; Rebecca is the wife of James Moore, of Clinton; Jacob died April 23, 1895; Amanda is the widow of Alexander Blair and a resident of Rock Island, Illinois; Daniel died in infancy; Sarah died in childhood; Henry married and resides in Davenport; Wesley married Jessie Murphy, and is also a resident of Davenport; Edith is the wife of O. J. Knapp, of Marion; and another child died in infancy.

G. W. Allen accompanied his parents on their various removals during his boyhood, and was principally educated in the subscription schools of Salt Lake City and the district schools of Cedar and Linn counties, Iowa, but his opportunities along that line were rather limited. At the age of seventeen he commenced assisting his father in the mill, and he also engaged in the timber and tie business, and followed that until the breaking out of the war.

Mr. Allen remained at home until he joined the boys in blue during the war of the rebellion, enlisting at Cedar Rapids, August 11, 1862, in Company A, Twentieth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. After being mustered in at Clinton he went with his command to Davenport and later to St. Louis and Rolla, Missouri, where they drew accoutrements. For some time they were engaged in skirmishing between Springfield, that state, and Fayetteville, Arkansas, and took part in the battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas, December 7, 1862.

Later they were in a number of skirmishes in that state and Missouri until June, 1863, when they returned to St. Louis, where Mr. Allen was taken sick from exposure and was sent to the hospital in Jefferson City, Missouri. Subsequently he was granted a thirty-day furlough, which he spent at home, and on the expiration of that time rejoined his regiment at Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, where they remained six months. They next went to Brownsville, opposite Matamoras, Mexico, and from there to St. Mary's Light House, where they boarded a vessel, which carried them to New Orleans.

They marched up White river and were engaged in scouting around Duvall's Bluff for a time, and then returned to New Orleans, from which place they were ordered to Fort Morgan, and assisted in the capture of that stronghold. After this engagement they returned to New Orleans and later took a steamer to Pensacola, Florida, and from there went to Fort Barancas, Florida, and then to Fort Blakely, near Mobile, arriving in time to take an active part in the siege and capture of the fort. This practically closed the war, and they were mustered out at Mobile in April, 1865. By steamer they went to St. Louis, and from there returned to Clinton, Iowa, where they were discharged on the 27th of July.

Returning to his home in Bertram, Allen assisted his father in business until March, 1866, when he went to a point on the Missouri river near Omaha and engaged in rafting and flat boating on the river for some years. In 1879 we again find him in Linn county, and he devoted his time to railroad construction work until July 3, 1883, when he opened a general store in Bertrand and has since successfully engaged in business at that place, having the largest store of the kind in this section of the county.

He is a most progressive and up-to-date business man, and has been remarkably successful in his financial ventures. Besides his business property he owns town lots in Bertram, one lot in Marion, four and a half lots in Cedar Rapids, two hundred and sixty acres of land in this county, three hundred and twenty acres in South Dakota, five hundred and twenty acres in Missouri, eighty acres in Kansas, and eighty acres in Nebraska.

Near Tipton, Cedar county, Iowa, Mr. Allen was married, February 16, 1881, to Miss Ida Wirick, who was born December 26, 1854, in Richland county, Ohio, of which her parents, Joseph and Sarah (Myers) Wirick, were also natives. Mr. and Mrs. Wirick were married in Cedar county, this state, April 1, 1852, and then returned to Ohio to visit his parents, remaining there three years, during which time two children were born to them. In the fall of 1849 they returned to Cedar county, where Mr. Wirick engaged in farming until his death, which occurred November 7, 1891.

In 1896 his wife came to Linn county, and now makes her home with her children. Unto them were born fifteen children, namely Thomas married Ella Fulwider and lives in Boulder, Colorado; Mrs. Allen is next in order of birth; Loduska is engaged in missionary work at Tokyo, Japan; Cassius M. who is professor of chemistry in the Boys' Manual Training School of Chicago, married Fannie Pearce and second Cora Rhinerson; Plimpton is an expert machinist, living in Greensboro, North Carolina; Orange married Addie Foster, and is engaged in mining in Salina, Colorado; Asher married Catherine Thompson, and is a blacksmith in Cedar Bluffs, Iowa; Viola married John D. Werling, and died in Carbondale, Colorado, May 14, 1889; Minnie is the widow of John Howard, and resident of Clarence, Iowa; Myrta is the wife of William Werling, a farmer, of Cedar county; Lulu is a tailoress of Salina, Colorado; Helen married Isaac Collar, and died in Cedar county, Iowa, in November, 1896; Frank is a farmer living near Tipton, Iowa; Beatrice is the wife of Frank Hunter, of Bertram; and Lucian, twin brother of Beatrice, died at the age of eleven months. Mr. and Mrs. Allen have two daughters: Cora R., born June 1884; and Oma, born December 14, 1885, on the anniversary of George Washington's death. Both will graduate from the Bertram schools in 1901. ©2005 Transcribed for the IAGenWeb Project.

Socially Mr. Allen affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and T. Z. Cook Post, No. 235, G. A. R., of Cedar Rapids, and politically he is identified with the Democracy. Public spirited and enterprising he takes a very active interest in public affairs, and has acceptably filled a number of local offices, serving many years as a member of the school board and also as township clerk and treasurer for a number of years, as well as postmaster of Bertram. He is one of the most popular and influential citizens of his community.

Source: Biographical Record of Linn County, Iowa. Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1901. Pages 644-9.

Civil War veteran Company A 20th Iowa Infantry Regiment. Enlisted Aug 2, 1862. Mustered Aug 22, 1862. Mustered out July 8, 1865 in Mobile, Alabama.

G. W. Allen

Outside of Cedar Rapids there are many progressive and energetic business men in Linn County who have met with excellent success in their undertakings, and are now quite wealthy. Among these is numbered G. W. Allen, a well-known merchant of Bertram. He was born in Adams county, Illinois, September 25, 1843, and is a son of Franklin and Rebecca (Myers) Allen. His father was born in Dresden, New York, April 15, 1818, and came west during the 30's. He assisted in building Fort Leavenworth, Kansas, and was engaged in rafting down the Missouri river for a time in connection with a brother who was drowned while following that pursuit. Franklin Allen then went to Illinois, where he engaged in milling, and in that state he was married October 10, 1842, to Rebecca Myers, who was born in Richland county, Ohio, July 25, 1825. ©2005 Transcribed for the Project.

Subsequently they removed to Missouri, where he also followed milling until the Mexican war broke out. In 1846 he enlisted with five hundred others, and was in the service for sixteen months. He then returned to Council Bluffs, Iowa, where he had left his family, and followed his chosen occupation there until the spring of 1852. Being a Mormon at that time, he, with a colony and train of forty wagons, went to Salt Lake City, Utah, where he made his home until 1857, when he returned to Iowa and settled in Cedar county. He operated a mill in that place for two years, and then came to Linn county, where he followed the same occupation near Bertram until 1862.

During that year he again entered the service of his country enlisting in Company A, Twentieth Iowa Volunteer Infantry, but was discharged fifteen months later on account of disability and returned to his home in this county. He subsequently had the misfortune to lose an arm in the machinery of Scott's mill, near Bertram, and then removed to Bertram and embarked in mercantile business. He remained a resident of that place until his death, which occured December 16, 1890, and he was laid to rest in Campbell's cemetery. During the latter part of his life he was a member of the Freewill Baptist Church, and was always a supporter of the men and measures of the Democratic party. His patriotism and loyalty were manifested by his service in two wars, and he was ever recognized as a valued citizen of his community. His estimable wife died February 16. 1885.

Unto them were born fourteen children, of whom G. W., our subject, is the oldest; Samuel, the next in order of birth, died in infancy; Matilda is the wife of Thompson Kountz, of Bertram township, this county; Franklin married Nancy Bickford and lives in Maquoketa, Iowa; Vina, deceased, was the wife of Peter Flanagan, of Oxford, Iowa; Rebecca is the wife of James Moore, of Clinton; Jacob died April 23, 1895; Amanda is the widow of Alexander Blair and a resident of Rock Island, Illinois; Daniel died in infancy; Sarah died in childhood; Henry married and resides in Davenport; Wesley married Jessie Murphy, and is also a resident of Davenport; Edith is the wife of O. J. Knapp, of Marion; and another child died in infancy.

G. W. Allen accompanied his parents on their various removals during his boyhood, and was principally educated in the subscription schools of Salt Lake City and the district schools of Cedar and Linn counties, Iowa, but his opportunities along that line were rather limited. At the age of seventeen he commenced assisting his father in the mill, and he also engaged in the timber and tie business, and followed that until the breaking out of the war.

Mr. Allen remained at home until he joined the boys in blue during the war of the rebellion, enlisting at Cedar Rapids, August 11, 1862, in Company A, Twentieth Iowa Volunteer Infantry. After being mustered in at Clinton he went with his command to Davenport and later to St. Louis and Rolla, Missouri, where they drew accoutrements. For some time they were engaged in skirmishing between Springfield, that state, and Fayetteville, Arkansas, and took part in the battle of Prairie Grove, Arkansas, December 7, 1862.

Later they were in a number of skirmishes in that state and Missouri until June, 1863, when they returned to St. Louis, where Mr. Allen was taken sick from exposure and was sent to the hospital in Jefferson City, Missouri. Subsequently he was granted a thirty-day furlough, which he spent at home, and on the expiration of that time rejoined his regiment at Corpus Christi Bay, Texas, where they remained six months. They next went to Brownsville, opposite Matamoras, Mexico, and from there to St. Mary's Light House, where they boarded a vessel, which carried them to New Orleans.

They marched up White river and were engaged in scouting around Duvall's Bluff for a time, and then returned to New Orleans, from which place they were ordered to Fort Morgan, and assisted in the capture of that stronghold. After this engagement they returned to New Orleans and later took a steamer to Pensacola, Florida, and from there went to Fort Barancas, Florida, and then to Fort Blakely, near Mobile, arriving in time to take an active part in the siege and capture of the fort. This practically closed the war, and they were mustered out at Mobile in April, 1865. By steamer they went to St. Louis, and from there returned to Clinton, Iowa, where they were discharged on the 27th of July.

Returning to his home in Bertram, Allen assisted his father in business until March, 1866, when he went to a point on the Missouri river near Omaha and engaged in rafting and flat boating on the river for some years. In 1879 we again find him in Linn county, and he devoted his time to railroad construction work until July 3, 1883, when he opened a general store in Bertrand and has since successfully engaged in business at that place, having the largest store of the kind in this section of the county.

He is a most progressive and up-to-date business man, and has been remarkably successful in his financial ventures. Besides his business property he owns town lots in Bertram, one lot in Marion, four and a half lots in Cedar Rapids, two hundred and sixty acres of land in this county, three hundred and twenty acres in South Dakota, five hundred and twenty acres in Missouri, eighty acres in Kansas, and eighty acres in Nebraska.

Near Tipton, Cedar county, Iowa, Mr. Allen was married, February 16, 1881, to Miss Ida Wirick, who was born December 26, 1854, in Richland county, Ohio, of which her parents, Joseph and Sarah (Myers) Wirick, were also natives. Mr. and Mrs. Wirick were married in Cedar county, this state, April 1, 1852, and then returned to Ohio to visit his parents, remaining there three years, during which time two children were born to them. In the fall of 1849 they returned to Cedar county, where Mr. Wirick engaged in farming until his death, which occurred November 7, 1891.

In 1896 his wife came to Linn county, and now makes her home with her children. Unto them were born fifteen children, namely Thomas married Ella Fulwider and lives in Boulder, Colorado; Mrs. Allen is next in order of birth; Loduska is engaged in missionary work at Tokyo, Japan; Cassius M. who is professor of chemistry in the Boys' Manual Training School of Chicago, married Fannie Pearce and second Cora Rhinerson; Plimpton is an expert machinist, living in Greensboro, North Carolina; Orange married Addie Foster, and is engaged in mining in Salina, Colorado; Asher married Catherine Thompson, and is a blacksmith in Cedar Bluffs, Iowa; Viola married John D. Werling, and died in Carbondale, Colorado, May 14, 1889; Minnie is the widow of John Howard, and resident of Clarence, Iowa; Myrta is the wife of William Werling, a farmer, of Cedar county; Lulu is a tailoress of Salina, Colorado; Helen married Isaac Collar, and died in Cedar county, Iowa, in November, 1896; Frank is a farmer living near Tipton, Iowa; Beatrice is the wife of Frank Hunter, of Bertram; and Lucian, twin brother of Beatrice, died at the age of eleven months. Mr. and Mrs. Allen have two daughters: Cora R., born June 1884; and Oma, born December 14, 1885, on the anniversary of George Washington's death. Both will graduate from the Bertram schools in 1901. ©2005 Transcribed for the IAGenWeb Project.

Socially Mr. Allen affiliates with the Independent Order of Odd Fellows and T. Z. Cook Post, No. 235, G. A. R., of Cedar Rapids, and politically he is identified with the Democracy. Public spirited and enterprising he takes a very active interest in public affairs, and has acceptably filled a number of local offices, serving many years as a member of the school board and also as township clerk and treasurer for a number of years, as well as postmaster of Bertram. He is one of the most popular and influential citizens of his community.

Source: Biographical Record of Linn County, Iowa. Chicago: The S. J. Clarke Publishing Company, 1901. Pages 644-9.



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