Claudius Britton II

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Claudius Britton II Veteran

Birth
Windham, Windham County, Vermont, USA
Death
22 Feb 1850 (aged 88)
Pinckney, Livingston County, Michigan, USA
Burial
Pinckney, Livingston County, Michigan, USA GPS-Latitude: 42.4577567, Longitude: -83.9522387
Plot
Section 1 Lot 40 Grave 4
Memorial ID
View Source
Father: Claudius Britton I
Mother: Alethea Owen

On March 12, 1835 Claudius Britton II, then a resident of Pittsfield Twp., Michigan applied for a Revolutionary War Pension. Witnessing that pension was John Allen, the Founder of Ann Arbor. It was denied on the grounds that he did not serve a full six months because back then time as a POW did not count as service. He served from VT as a Scout for Captain Zadoc Averist, under Major Smith.

On November 6th 1778 in Weybridge, Vermont his father, himself, and about forty other neighbors were taken prisoner by a Canadian scouting party commanded by Major Carlton and taken to Quebec where he was imprisoned for three years in Quebec. He was put in the dungeon for trying to escape once. and then on a Prison Ship on Murray Bay. In July 1783 during preparations for a prisoner exchange of about 350 people Claudius signed the Exchange Bill at St. Johns July 14th, 1783 and was marched into Vermont and then discharged.

He then moved to Tinmouth, Vermont until 1812 when he moved to Batavia, New York and then to Ann Arbor in 1825 where he bought land on the corner of what is now Washtenaw Ave and Huron Parkway. In 1836 he sold it to the county for $1,200 so they could establish a Poor Farm, which would eventually become County Farm Park and the Washtenaw Recreation Center. He and his family then moved to Pinckney. His sons Claudius III and Roswell served in the War of 1812.

His grave was marked with a VA headstone in 1950.
Father: Claudius Britton I
Mother: Alethea Owen

On March 12, 1835 Claudius Britton II, then a resident of Pittsfield Twp., Michigan applied for a Revolutionary War Pension. Witnessing that pension was John Allen, the Founder of Ann Arbor. It was denied on the grounds that he did not serve a full six months because back then time as a POW did not count as service. He served from VT as a Scout for Captain Zadoc Averist, under Major Smith.

On November 6th 1778 in Weybridge, Vermont his father, himself, and about forty other neighbors were taken prisoner by a Canadian scouting party commanded by Major Carlton and taken to Quebec where he was imprisoned for three years in Quebec. He was put in the dungeon for trying to escape once. and then on a Prison Ship on Murray Bay. In July 1783 during preparations for a prisoner exchange of about 350 people Claudius signed the Exchange Bill at St. Johns July 14th, 1783 and was marched into Vermont and then discharged.

He then moved to Tinmouth, Vermont until 1812 when he moved to Batavia, New York and then to Ann Arbor in 1825 where he bought land on the corner of what is now Washtenaw Ave and Huron Parkway. In 1836 he sold it to the county for $1,200 so they could establish a Poor Farm, which would eventually become County Farm Park and the Washtenaw Recreation Center. He and his family then moved to Pinckney. His sons Claudius III and Roswell served in the War of 1812.

His grave was marked with a VA headstone in 1950.

Inscription

[CHRISTIAN CROSS]
CLAUDIUS BRITTON
VERMONT
SCOUT CAPT ZADOC AVERIS CO
REV WAR
SEP 15 1761 FEB 22 1850

Gravesite Details

In the Front North East Corner of the cemetery.
National Society Sons of the American Revolution Patriot Emblem Marker