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 Robert “Buzz” Henry

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Robert “Buzz” Henry Famous memorial

Birth
Colorado, USA
Death
30 Sep 1971 (aged 40)
Los Angeles, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Burial
Mission Hills, Los Angeles County, California, USA
Memorial ID
76616244 View Source

Actor. He received notoriety as an American actor during the 20th century. As a four-year-old actor with large brown eyes using the name of “Buzz” Henry, he had the role of the heroine's little brother in the 1935 Columbia Studios B-western film, “Western Frontier.” He had a major role in the 1940 film “Buzzy Rides the Range” and in 1941 “Phantom Pinto.” In the 1943 film “Calling Wild Bill Elliot,” he mounts a horse and races at a speed equaled to the camera mounted on the truck traveling parallel beside him. As an adult actor, he was a stuntman doubling for actors such as Frank Sinatra, Glenn Ford, and James Coburn. Since his mother managed horse stables, he learned how to ride a horse at an early age. Having a daredevil personality, he often appeared as a rodeo performer in Western movies. His film appearances included “The Last Command” in 1955, “3:10 to Yuma” in 1957, “Tonka” in 1958, “The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond” in 1960, “Shenandoah” and “Von Ryan's Express” in 1965, and “El Dorado” in 1966. He was stunt coordinator and second unit director for the 1972 John Wayne film “The Cowboys”. While apparently drag racing , he was killed in an auto-motorcycle accident on the street in front of Forest Lawn Cemetery.

Actor. He received notoriety as an American actor during the 20th century. As a four-year-old actor with large brown eyes using the name of “Buzz” Henry, he had the role of the heroine's little brother in the 1935 Columbia Studios B-western film, “Western Frontier.” He had a major role in the 1940 film “Buzzy Rides the Range” and in 1941 “Phantom Pinto.” In the 1943 film “Calling Wild Bill Elliot,” he mounts a horse and races at a speed equaled to the camera mounted on the truck traveling parallel beside him. As an adult actor, he was a stuntman doubling for actors such as Frank Sinatra, Glenn Ford, and James Coburn. Since his mother managed horse stables, he learned how to ride a horse at an early age. Having a daredevil personality, he often appeared as a rodeo performer in Western movies. His film appearances included “The Last Command” in 1955, “3:10 to Yuma” in 1957, “Tonka” in 1958, “The Rise and Fall of Legs Diamond” in 1960, “Shenandoah” and “Von Ryan's Express” in 1965, and “El Dorado” in 1966. He was stunt coordinator and second unit director for the 1972 John Wayne film “The Cowboys”. While apparently drag racing , he was killed in an auto-motorcycle accident on the street in front of Forest Lawn Cemetery.

Bio by: Linda Davis


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  • Maintained by: Find a Grave
  • Originally Created by: gordonphilbin
  • Added: 16 Sep 2011
  • Find a Grave Memorial ID: 76616244
  • Find a Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com/memorial/76616244/robert-henry: accessed ), memorial page for Robert “Buzz” Henry (4 Sep 1931–30 Sep 1971), Find a Grave Memorial ID 76616244, citing San Fernando Mission Cemetery, Mission Hills, Los Angeles County, California, USA; Maintained by Find a Grave.