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 Juan Ramón Jiménez

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Juan Ramón Jiménez Famous memorial

Birth
Moguer, Provincia de Huelva, Andalucia, Spain
Death
29 May 1958 (aged 76)
San Juan, San Juan Municipality, Puerto Rico, USA
Burial
Moguer, Provincia de Huelva, Andalucia, Spain
Memorial ID
7533271 View Source

Nobel Prize Recipient. He received world-wide recognition as a prolific 20th century writer in the Spanish language. For this work, he was the 1956 Nobel Prize in Literature recipient. He received only five nominations for the Nobel candidacy. Writing poems and painting as a child, he dropped his interest in writing to attend the University of Seville to study law and art. Later, he returned to his first love and moved to Madrid to follow the "modernismo movement" in Spanish literature. After the sudden death of his father, he wrote his first volumes of poetry in 1900, "Almas de violeta" or "Souls of Violet" and "Ninfeas" or "Water Lilies." Published in the colors of violet and green, he regretted this option in his later years. His early poetry was influenced by W. B. Yeats, German Romanticism and French Symbolism. From 1905 to 1912, he was living in his hometown in isolation and wrote "Elejia puras" or "Pure Elegies" in 1908, "La soledad sonora" or "Sonorous Solitude" in 1911, and "Poemas mágicos y dolientes." or "Magic Poems of Sorrow" in 1911. Today, his 1914 book, "Platero y yo" or "Platero and I" is analyzed and memorized by students in all the schools in Spain. In 1968, it was adapted to a Spain film. The use of colors can be seen in his early and latter poetry. Suffering for profound depression most of his life, he was hospitalized three times for months at a time in a sanatorium for treatment. He often wrote about death. While in the United States in 1916, he married Zenobia Camprubi, a writer, poet and translator. He assisted his wife with translations. Although he was considered a brilliant writer, he was a frail man physically and emotionally. Eventually, his wife became his companion, collaborator and at times, caregiver. The newly-weds moved to Portugal. In 1917 he published "Diario de un poeta recién casado" or "Diary of a Poet Recently Married." This was published in 1948 under the title "Diario de un poeta y mar" or "Diary of a Poet and the Sea," which marked his transition to what he called "la poesía desnuda" or "naked poetry. " In the 1920s, he became the leader of the new generation of poets. He became a critic as well as the editor of several literary journals. In 1930 he and his wife retired to Seville. He was offered the post of Spanish Ambassador to the United States in 1936 but refused. At that point, he left Spain because of the Spanish Civil War. He became very involved with the care of war orphans. He and his wife lived first in Cuba; then Puerto Rico; for nearly twelve years in the United States, in Florida and Washington D.C.; and returning to Puerto Rico in 1951. During this time, he taught in universities and published books. The University of Puerto Rico and the University of Maryland have buildings on their campus named in his honor. His last book Animal de Fondo" or "Animals of Depth" reveals his deep preoccupation with religion that filled his last years. Two days after receiving the Nobel Prize, his wife died of ovarian cancer. His grief was overwhelming. He became depressed, unable to concentrate and write, and he died two years later. He donated his papers and books to the University of Puerto Rico at Río Piedras as he had taught a course on modernism there in 1953. Selections of most of his works were published in 1963 with an English translation in "Selected Writing of Juan Romon Jimenez" and the collection, "Three Hundred Poems, 1903 to 1953." In 2007 about a hundred of his erotic theme poems were published under the title of "Libro de Amor" or "Books of Love." His image was on the Spanish currency, the peseta.

Nobel Prize Recipient. He received world-wide recognition as a prolific 20th century writer in the Spanish language. For this work, he was the 1956 Nobel Prize in Literature recipient. He received only five nominations for the Nobel candidacy. Writing poems and painting as a child, he dropped his interest in writing to attend the University of Seville to study law and art. Later, he returned to his first love and moved to Madrid to follow the "modernismo movement" in Spanish literature. After the sudden death of his father, he wrote his first volumes of poetry in 1900, "Almas de violeta" or "Souls of Violet" and "Ninfeas" or "Water Lilies." Published in the colors of violet and green, he regretted this option in his later years. His early poetry was influenced by W. B. Yeats, German Romanticism and French Symbolism. From 1905 to 1912, he was living in his hometown in isolation and wrote "Elejia puras" or "Pure Elegies" in 1908, "La soledad sonora" or "Sonorous Solitude" in 1911, and "Poemas mágicos y dolientes." or "Magic Poems of Sorrow" in 1911. Today, his 1914 book, "Platero y yo" or "Platero and I" is analyzed and memorized by students in all the schools in Spain. In 1968, it was adapted to a Spain film. The use of colors can be seen in his early and latter poetry. Suffering for profound depression most of his life, he was hospitalized three times for months at a time in a sanatorium for treatment. He often wrote about death. While in the United States in 1916, he married Zenobia Camprubi, a writer, poet and translator. He assisted his wife with translations. Although he was considered a brilliant writer, he was a frail man physically and emotionally. Eventually, his wife became his companion, collaborator and at times, caregiver. The newly-weds moved to Portugal. In 1917 he published "Diario de un poeta recién casado" or "Diary of a Poet Recently Married." This was published in 1948 under the title "Diario de un poeta y mar" or "Diary of a Poet and the Sea," which marked his transition to what he called "la poesía desnuda" or "naked poetry. " In the 1920s, he became the leader of the new generation of poets. He became a critic as well as the editor of several literary journals. In 1930 he and his wife retired to Seville. He was offered the post of Spanish Ambassador to the United States in 1936 but refused. At that point, he left Spain because of the Spanish Civil War. He became very involved with the care of war orphans. He and his wife lived first in Cuba; then Puerto Rico; for nearly twelve years in the United States, in Florida and Washington D.C.; and returning to Puerto Rico in 1951. During this time, he taught in universities and published books. The University of Puerto Rico and the University of Maryland have buildings on their campus named in his honor. His last book Animal de Fondo" or "Animals of Depth" reveals his deep preoccupation with religion that filled his last years. Two days after receiving the Nobel Prize, his wife died of ovarian cancer. His grief was overwhelming. He became depressed, unable to concentrate and write, and he died two years later. He donated his papers and books to the University of Puerto Rico at Río Piedras as he had taught a course on modernism there in 1953. Selections of most of his works were published in 1963 with an English translation in "Selected Writing of Juan Romon Jimenez" and the collection, "Three Hundred Poems, 1903 to 1953." In 2007 about a hundred of his erotic theme poems were published under the title of "Libro de Amor" or "Books of Love." His image was on the Spanish currency, the peseta.

Bio by: Linda Davis


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