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 Charles Bean Rounds

Charles Bean Rounds

Birth
Danville, Androscoggin County, Maine, USA
Death 16 Nov 1903 (aged 68)
Calais, Washington County, Maine, USA
Burial Calais, Washington County, Maine, USA
Memorial ID 74164263 · View Source
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Proceedings of the Washington County, Maine, Bar, in relation to the death of Hon. Charles Bean Rounds, April term, S.J. court, Calais, . He had died November 16, 1903, and this was a memorial exercise included remarks by Richard J. McGarrigle, Esquire. "May it please the Court: In rising to offer some remarks in connection with the resolution just now adopted, I feel like my long and intimate relations with our friend and brother, and my knowledge of his character gained through nearly 25 years of unbroken, uninterrupted and unreserved friendship justify, if they do not require from me on this occasion, an expression of my own deep conviction of his true character and some reference to a few of his most striking characteristics of both mind and heart."
"Brother Rounds' life was like that of many a New England man who lived during the period that he did. His early struggles for an education, his service in the army during the war of the rebellion are well known, but aside from this his life was that of a lawyer, pure and simple. All the years of his active life were given to the law. His professional life was wholly spent at the bar. It is here, in this court building, that he labored faithfully, ably and successfully to have built; it is here, and by this bar,and by this court, in this, to him, most honored spot where he spent so many hours of the latter months of his life, even when sickness was troubling him, giving his time and advice free, that this building might be a credit and pride to our city and county, due honor should be paid his memory, and more than formal expressions of sorrow be given, as we so sadly miss his every welcome presence in our midst."
"Brother Rounds was an able counsellor and a successful advocate. He entertained a high opinion of the science of law, and a profound admiration and respect for the great authors who have illustrated it, and the courts who have administered it. In his practice, while he was faithful to his client, he did not forget that in the temple of justice he was also a priest to guard its sacred precincts.. Barring the infirmities of human nature, he faithfully kept his solemn oath when admitted to the bar, to do no falsehood, or consent to the doing of any in the court, and to conduct himself, in the office of an attorney within the courts according to the best of his knowledge, and with all fidelity, as well as to the courts as to his clients. However humble or poor, no one ever in vain solicited his services, from want of influence or money, and no client was ever oppressed for the payment of the compensation he had justly earned. His kindness was conspicuously manifested in his cordial treatment of the younger members of the bar. He never sought to discomfort them by the display of his superior knowledge, but rather, to encourage them by courteous acts and encouraging words. He was a good citizen, and in the public positions with which his fellow citizens honored him, and in the private walks of life, which he always adorned with his many good qualities, he successfully tried to do his duty."
"I have alluded to my intimate personal relations with our late brother. I first became acquainted with him in 1878, and two years later entered his office as a student, and upon my admission to the bar in 1882, I became associated with him in business and remained with him until his death, a period of almost 25 years. He was not naturally demonstrative, or accustomed to exhibit outwardly his inmost feelings. He was never profuse in expressions of friendship, and never sought to extend his popularity by indistriminate and heartless professions. But he was a man of keen sensibilities and strong feelings, hid under a calm and quiet exterior. He was the friend of all, but his intimates, to whom he unbosomed his inner self, were few."
"'The friends he had, and their adoption tried/He grappled them to his soul with hooks of steel.""
"In view of my intimate personal relations, before alluded to, so confidential and so long continued, I feel that I shall be pardoned if I speak of my own individual loss and of my private grief."
"When I heard that he was dead, I felt that the world would have less of sunshine for me hereafter. I felt that I had lost, not an associate but a brother, who had so long, indeed, been very pleasant to me. I miss his ready counsel, his friendly advice, his amusing anecdotes so pleasingly told, the sound of his cheery voice and the responsive look of his kindly eye. Yet with the sorrow came the consoling remembrance, which will be a cherished memory with me while life shall last, that through these long years of intimacy there had never been an hour of estrangement, nor an angry nor an unkind word, or the slightest shadow across our friendship, confidence and mutual respect, and I feel that it is due to the memory of our brother, to say, now that he has departed, what I know he would have me say of our personal relations. I should feel that I had not done justice to him in these last public tributes to his life and character, if I had not spoken of our more than common intimacy and friendship."
"And now what better tribute can we pay him than to say that he was a kind friend, a well loved comrade, a true and noble man whose memory will long be green in the hearts of those who knew him best."



He was the son of Nathaniel Rounds and Paulina Perley.


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  • Created by: SusanE
  • Added: 29 Jul 2011
  • Find A Grave Memorial 74164263
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Charles Bean Rounds (8 Dec 1834–16 Nov 1903), Find A Grave Memorial no. 74164263, citing Calais Cemetery, Calais, Washington County, Maine, USA ; Maintained by SusanE (contributor 47098878) .