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Judge George W. Holland

Judge George W. Holland

Birth
Westville, Franklin County, New York, USA
Death 23 Apr 1913 (aged 70)
Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, USA
Burial Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, USA
Plot Block 17, Lot 28, 4 ft. NWC
Memorial ID 73930713 · View Source
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Arrived in Brainerd in 1871.

Uncle of George D. LaBar.

•See John Bubar.
•See Blanche Sleeper Smith.
•See Maud Sleeper Hazen.
•See Anna Steege Ferris Young.
•See Frederick Mervin "Buff" McNaughton.
•See Nicholas Heller.
•See Myrta Bixby Murray.
•See Patrick Ryan.
•See Emma E. Forsythe.
•See Lee Chung.
•See John E. Pryde.
•See Charles Douglas Johnson.
•See Dr. Werner Hemstead.

County Attorney 1872-1884 and 1886-1888
15th Judicial District Judge, January 5, 1889 to January 7, 1901

      Messrs. D. O. Preston, G. W. Holland, J. C. Rosser, S. V. R. Sherwood and others have been treating themselves to new suits of clothes and silk hats, making quite a change in the appearance of the town. This is the Centennial year, you know. (Brainerd Tribune, 25 March 1876, p. 1, c. 7)

      Tuesday morning, Mr. Holland, our county attorney, having never killed a deer, was taken very low with the fever, and away he hied. After hunting some time he was crossing a piece of rising ground when he saw a deer and fired at it. The deer jumped into the brush out of sight, and he ran down in the direction the deer had gone to head it off or see if he had hit it, but after going some distance and seeing no tracks he went to the spot where he had seen the deer. As he came near he heard a noise in the brush nearby, and going up there lay a deer, kicking, shot through the neck. He soon cut its throat, and was dressing it, when he heard something a little farther on, and going to it found it to be another deer, with its back broken. He soon dispatched this and cut its throat, when he began to wonder—like the man whose wife gave birth to seven children at once—if any had got away. Diligent search, however, proved that there had not, and he, after dressing them, came home about the proudest man in these diggin's. (Brainerd Tribune, 02 December 1876, p. 1, c. 6)

      OUR genial County Attorney started out on a fishing excursion one day this week in such grotesque attire that the canine tribe became wonderfully attracted by the oddity of his appearance, and flocked around him almost by hundreds from every quarter, barking and howling most dismally. George endeavored for some time to pass along the street in dignified oblivion to the uproar and his surroundings, but the dogs continued to draw closer and closer upon every hand, and increased in numbers until some of the boldest had the audacity to spring at him, snap at his shins and retreat over the backs of their comrades, that by this time made one vast field of moving, howling, growling, panting, snapping, glaring, snarling, frothing, sausage meat. The gravity of the occasion became by this time too much for the gravity of the "eminent counsel upon the other side," and he decided to "wade in," and the way he lunged that spear right and left for a little while was decidedly interesting; if not to the dogs, at least to the witnesses, especially those who eat sausage. George has been searching the statutes ever since for a dog law. (Brainerd Tribune, 14 April 1877, p. 1, c. 7)

      HON. S. G [sic] [C]. HOLLAND member of the House of Representatives, from Zumbrota, paid Brainerd and his brother G. W. Holland, of this city, a visit this week. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 January 1878, p. 4, c. 1)

      A couple of our prominent citizens, entered the law office of G. W. Holland on Thursday morning last and then and there with malice prepense and without the authority of law or the fear of each other before their eyes, did assault, beat, bruise, knock down and otherwise abuse, ill-treat, upset and derange the stove, stove-pipe and other furniture, fixtures and belongings therein and thereto contained and appertaining, contrary to the form of the statute, in such case made and provided, and against the peace and dignity of the office and of each other. Mr. Holland has presented a bill for damages. (Brainerd Tribune, 21 September 1878, p. 4, c. 1)

      The TRIBUNE being delayed somewhat this week, as elsewhere announced, is enable briefly to record a very unfortunate occurrence which took place this (Monday) afternoon at the law office of G. W. Holland, county attorney, in which in an altercation which took place between Mr. Holland and George McClarty, a citizen of this place, both were slightly wounded and fatal results were narrowly escaped. It appears (without entering into the merits or demerits of the attack) that McClarty entered the office and requested Mr. Holland to step outside to fight him, which he refused to do, when a scuffle ensued, in which Mr. Holland was shot in the head the ball entering near the crown and glancing from the skull leaving a scalp wound about two inches in length, and McClarty received a flesh wound in the left hand from a knife. The wounds in either case are not serious, but the call was a close one for Mr. Holland in particular. McClarty has been arrested and is in jail and the TRIBUNE will forbear an opinion pending legal proceedings. (Brainerd Tribune, 29 March 1879, p. 4, c. 1)

      George McClarty, who was arrested for shooting G. W. Holland as announced in our last issue, was released on Wednesday, and has left the town. Mr. Holland is not feeling as well as at last account; the wound in his head being pretty sore. (Brainerd Tribune, 05 April 1879, p. 4, c. 1)

      The McClarty house and lot are for sale at this office for only $225.00 with a new carpet, two stoves, chairs, bedstead, etc. thrown in. (Brainerd Tribune, 19 April 1879, p. 4, c. 1)

Partnered with William Ferris in 1879 to form the Bank of Brainerd which then became the First National Bank in 1881.

Holland, George W.

A native of New York. He received his education at the Madison University, Wisconsin, where he graduated in 1868, and the following year, was admitted to the Bar of that State. He came to Minnesota in 1871, was admitted to the Bar of this State, and in the fall of the same year, elected County Attorney of Crow Wing county, which office he has since filled with the exception of one year. Soon after coming to Brainerd, in 1872, he was appointed to fill a vacancy on the board of Supervisors, and has held different offices, such as member of the board of Education, Superintendent of Schools, etc. (History of the Upper Mississippi Valley, Winchell, Neill, Williams and Bryant, Minnesota Historical Company, Minneapolis: 1881; p. 648)

      On Tuesday evening, the 9th, County Attorney Holland was summoned to Zumbrota, this state, by a telegram notifying him of the death of his sister, Mrs. Mary C. LaBar. Mr. Holland returned home the following Tuesday. (Brainerd Tribune, 20 August 1881, p. 5, c. 2)

            Notice of Co-partnership.

      The undersigned have formed a co-partnership for the practice of law, to date from Jan. 1, 1884.
      Brainerd, Minn., Feb. 8, 1884.
      G. W. HOLLAND.
      W. S. McCLENAHAN. (Brainerd Dispatch, 14 February 1884, p. 3, c. 3)

                A Frightful Accident.

      Judge Geo. W. Holland was seriously, if not fatally, injured on Saturday night of last week by being thrown from a carriage behind a runaway team. A party of ladies and gentlemen had been attending a party at the residence of Miss [sic] Fannie Louise [sic] [Elizabeth] Smith, near Perch Lake in Cass county, and were returning about 1 o'clock. The carriage in which Judge Holland was riding also contained Alec. McNaughton, Miss Ella Robinson and Miss [sic] Lizzie Tennis. During the ride the carriage collided with a stump and the pole was broken. It was discovered and was repaired as well as could be by straps and it was thought to be safe enough until the party would arrive at their homes, which was only a short distance, but it seems that when the vehicle came upon the Mississippi wagon bridge the pole parted again and let the carriage upon the horses' heels and they started on a run and soon became unmanageable, the unguided carriage plunging from side to side nearly half way over the bridge. Mr. McNaughton jumped from his seat and endeavored to stop the frightened horses but a sudden plunge brought the carriage up against the bridge timbers and went to pieces, throwing the parties out and seriously injuring Judge Holland, who struck on the right side of his head and was insensible when assistance arrived. Help was summoned from the Sanitarium, close at hand, and he was carried on a cot to the Arlington Hotel. He did not regain consciousness and has been in a deep sleep nearly all the time since. A blood vessel in the brain was ruptured and which has resulted in paralysis of his right side. All that medical aid could do has been done for him, and it is thought that he is a little easier to-day, although he is by no means out of danger. The physicians state that if the blood absorbs and does not clot in his brain he will probably recover, but if not, inflammation will set in with fatal results. The greatest sympathy is expressed on all sides and it is sincerely hoped by every person in the city that he will recover as his death would be a calamity, not only at home but to the entire northern part of the state.
      The other members of the party were not injured to any extent excepting a few bruises and scratches. It is the greatest wonder in the world that some of them were not precipitated into the river below as the bridge is not a tight one, only being guarded by a slight railing. (Brainerd Dispatch, 08 November 1889, p. 4, c. 4)

      We are pleased to announce that Judge Holland is slowly recovering from his recent serious injuries. It is thought that the critical period is passed, and that his recovery is now certain, although necessarily very slow. His mind, it is reported, is bright and clear, and he is also regaining the use of his right side, being able to move his right leg and arm. (Brainerd Dispatch, 15 November 1889, p. 4, c. 4)

      The annual meeting of the stockholders of the First National Bank was held on Monday, at which time the following directors were elected: G. W. Holland, B. A. Ferris, Adam Brown, A. F. Ferris, Leon E. Lum, H. J. Spencer and G. D. LaBar. (Brainerd Dispatch, 15 January 1892, p. 4, c. 3)

              WHILE THE BOOM IS ON
                            _____

     Judge Holland Will Not Practice Law
                  But Sell Real Estate.
                            _____

      G. W. Holland sells lots in different parts of the city and five acre farms within ten minutes walk of the Northern Pacific shops. He sells land and farms near the city. He will buy or sell lots or help persons to erect residences.
      Call and see him before investing; smoke a Havana, figure with him how much more ground the mammoth Northern Pacific shops cover than the Chicago exposition building did; talk of the different styles of architecture in the 97 buildings in the process of construction in the city of Brainerd on April 9th last.
      He will not practice law while the boom is on. If requested, he will tell you when Brainerd will be big enough to doff her girl clothes and appear in long dresses.
      When the carpenter's hammer rests nights, and is heard days only, when the Northern Pacific Railway branches make direct connections between Brainerd and Koochiching, Brainerd and Mille Lacs Lake, Brainerd and Winnipeg and helps to form a network of railroad tracks in northern Minnesota; when 3000 men are employed at the Northern Pacific shops ten hours per day; when Brainerd shall have passed the 30,000th population post, as up prosperity river she climbs, and the Brainerd Boom pauses to breathe, then he may resume law business, although he has already worked in that department of science 29 years in Brainerd.
      Don't be afraid to call. It won't cost you anything. (Brainerd Dispatch, 19 April 1901, p. 8, c. 6)

      The Iron Exchange Building, built of yellow-enamel brick by W. D. McKay, Ransford R. Wise, George Holland and George LaBar in 1910-11, it is the largest single business structure in the city. It occupies almost the entire south half of the block on the west side of Sixth Street between Front and Laurel Streets and contains store space, office space, lodge rooms, a restaurant and a hotel. [The building burns on 22 July 1970.] (Brainerd 1871-1946, Carl Zapffe, Colwell Press, Incorporated, Minneapolis, Minnesota: 1946; pp. 74-75)

           JUDGE HOLLAND
                        DIES FROM WOUND
                            _____

       Accidentally Shoots Himself While
            Cleaning Revolver, Prepara-
                  tory to Going to Mine
                            _____

        WAS CONSCIOUS WHEN FOUND
                            _____

      Explains How Accident Happened,
      Lapsed Into Unconsciousness and
            Died at 1:45 this Afternoon

      Shortly after 11 o'clock this morning Judge G. W. Holland, one of the most prominent financiers, bankers and mining men of the Northwest, accidentally shot himself with an automatic revolver which he was cleaning in his office in the First National bank block.
      Two shots of the automatic revolver were distinctly hear on the walk outside as the window of the office was open.
      Former County Attorney A. D. Polk whose office adjoins the suite of rooms occupied by Judge Holland, heard not shot. He happened to walk in the hallway and seeing the judge's door ajar, as it usually is, walked in when he heard the judge groaning.
      As he entered Judge Holland, half rose from his office chair and said: "I've been cleaning that revolver and it went off and struck me here," indicating his left side.
      Mr. Polk and Henri Ribbel helped the judge to his bed in the room adjoining.
      Mr. Holland had been cleaning the .25 automatic Smith & Wesson gun. On his desk lay a screw driver with which he had been working His dip needle was near by, as the judge intended to take a trip in his buggy and visit some land on the Cuyuna range. His plat book lay open on the desk.
      The judge had partly loaded the gun and while using the screw driver the automatic was accidentally discharged. A second shot quickly followed the first, striking an inch apart and lodging at a point in the left side below the heart and above the stomach, a third bullet penetrating the stomach.
      The judge retained consciousness for two hours. Drs. Camp, Thabes and Sykora were quickly called. It was first thought best to take him to the hospital, but after consultation he was kept at his bedroom which adjoins his office.
      At this hour (1:20 P. M.) he is suffering great pain. There have been internal hemorrhages.
                          BULLETIN
      1:45 P. M.—Judge Holland passed away at this hour. (Brainerd Daily Dispatch, 23 April 1913, p. 3, c. 1)

            HIS DEATH A SAD
                         LOSS TO BRAINERD
                            _____

         City and Vicinity Mourn Passing
           Away of Kind and Generous
                 Judge G. W. Holland
                            _____

        WAS RESIDENT HERE 41 YEARS
                            _____

    He Was Identified With Almost Every
          Important Move Toward Im-
                  proving Brainerd

      Judge G. W. Holland was one of the public spirited, enterprising, wholehearted citizens of Brainerd. Identified with Brainerd from its earliest history, he literally grew up with the town. Young, vigorous and determined, he made this city his home in the early days in October, 1871, at a time when he and this city were just at the beginning of their careers.
      He was born in Westville, N. Y., on March 17, 1843. He took a literary course at the University of Wisconsin and studied law at Berlin in the same state, where he was admitted to the bar. The Northern Pacific railway had just been built to Brainerd and in casting about for an opening he decided that Brainerd offered good opportunities for a young lawyer about to engage in practice.
      Shortly after, he was elected county attorney, holding that position continuously until he was elected judge, being a period of about fifteen years. He was elected judge of the district in 1888, defeating C. B. Sleeper. He was elected a second time six years later, defeating P. V. Coppernoll, of Wadena. He had a partner in the law business early in the seventies. Later Judge W. S. McClenahan became his partner in 1883 until the time he went on the bench.
      He was a very successful practitioner and vigorous prosecuting attorney, possessed of the highest integrity, he commanded the respect of all.
      "In 1882," said Judge McClenahan, he had an office on the railway right of way west of the hose house. When I became a partner of the judge, we removed to rooms in the newly completed First National bank block where formerly S. R. Adair had his jewelry store. The judge was a candidate to the legislature as a democrat and was defeated by Dr. J. R. Howes."
      Upon leaving the bench, Judge Holland devoted himself to real estate, mining and other business investments. No history of the banking interests of Brainerd would be complete without special reference to Judge Holland. When the matter of the organization of what is now the First National bank of Brainerd was on foot it was Judge Holland who drew all necessary legal papers in connection with the work and he was a stockholder from the start and a member of the first board of directors elected at the organization of the bank on the 11th day of October, 1881. There have been few board meetings which he had not attended. He served continuously as a director and was also vice president of the bank.
      Judge Holland, seeing the future of Brainerd clearly, had invested heavily in real estate and had not only much city realty but large property interests throughout the country and had extensive holdings in the best iron ore lands on the Cuyuna range.
      He was instrumental with R. R. Wise and Wm. C. White in organizing the Brainerd Mining company of which he was vice president. This company is the fee owner of the property at Barrows being operated by the M. A. Hanna Co. He was active in the development of iron lands and last week had closed leases on lands he owned on the south side and in Southeast Brainerd.
      To many people of Brainerd the loss of Judge Holland comes as a sad blow. It means the passing away of a good and faithful friend, a man who believed in the upbuilding of Brainerd and this county, a man who was unostentatious in his charities and who was always willing to help the man or project which needed assistance.
      Looking back over the files of the Daily Dispatch on March 17, one reads a little interview the judge gave the writer. The judge in simple language referred to the life hereafter and reading it in conjunction with his sudden passing away, one is moved to tears. he was 70 years old that 17th of March. He stated:
      "I was a resident of Brainerd 41 years on the ninth of October last. Am near to the mouth of life's river. The great unknown ocean that all must navigate is a little way ahead, just across the bend.
      "I feel that if I help do anything for the city that all my business life has been spent in, I should act quickly.
      "I am with the boosters to the end. I sometimes think it useless to talk and work so hard for our town.
      "Brainerd will be here building beautiful streets, manufacturing plants, sky scrapers and other improvements a million years after we are gone, but most residents of a city cannot help feeling that way.
      "I am mistaken so often about Brainerd's future that I hesitate to express an opinion, but I hope she will don a part of her new suit this summer and like the boy with the new red top boots look happy and say she will be a bigger girl next year."
      The judge attained high rank in the Masonic order, being actively identified with the various local orders of the Masons and Zurah Temple of the Mystic Shrine at Minneapolis.
      He leaves a nephew, George D. LaBar, president of the First National bank of this city; three nieces, being Mrs. A. B. Church of Long Prairie, Mrs. E. S. Person of Minot, N. D. and Mrs. J. A. Fizzel of Montreal, Canada, and a nephew, H. W. Spencer of Malone, N. Y.
      There are no living brothers or sisters.
      The remains will lie in state at the undertaking parlors of Losey & Dean until 10 o'clock Friday morning, when they will be removed to the residence of George D. LaBar, 324 North Seventh street and may be viewed there until two o'clock in the afternoon.
      At three o'clock the funeral will be held from the residence of Mr. LaBar, the services being conducted under the auspices of the Masonic order, Aurora Lodge, No. 100, with Ascalon Commandery of the Knights Templar acting as an escort. The short services at the house will be by Rev. G. F. Sheridan, pastor of the First Congregational church. Interment will be in Evergreen cemetery.
                           _____

               Tributes to His Memory

      Telegram from Wm. C. White of Milwaukee, Wis., to R. R. Wise: "I am greatly shocked by the sad news. Brainerd has lost one of its ablest and best citizens."
      R. R. Wise: "We have lost Judge Holland just when Brainerd most needed him."
      Judge W. S. McClenahan: "He was a man of the strictest integrity, honorable in all his dealings, good hearted and a generous man."
      Former Senator S. F. Alderman: "Judge Holland was one of the first persons with whom I became acquainted on my arrival in Brainerd thirty years ago this spring. At that time he was county attorney and was engaged in the prosecution of criminal cases at the spring term of court before Judge O. P. Stearns, at that time the district judge. it required but a short time, as a spectator at that term of court, to learn the true character, worth and ability of Judge Holland as a prosecutor and practitioner. His duty was performed without fear or favor and he was regarded, by all who knew him, as an honest man. In the fall of 1888, he was elected judge of the district court over Judge Sleeper, who was then presiding judge under appointment from the governor. This office he presided over for 12 years when he was succeeded by Judge McClenahan.
      "Soon after retiring from the district bench Judge Holland became actively engaged in the real estate business and to him is due much credit for the discovery and development of what is known as the south range, on which he had and owns several iron mines.
      "During my thirty years' acquaintance with Judge Holland I never knew him to betray a trust or to betray a friend and in his business dealings, while firm and unyielding in his views, yet his word was always considered as good as his bond and no man ever charged unfairness on his part.
      "Identified with almost every important move toward the improvement and betterment of our city, he was looked upon as one of the most public spirited citizens of this entire community and one always ready to give liberally to every charitable cause. The city and community have met with irreparable loss in the death of our old friend, but his works commenced will live as long as our fair city shall stand."
      George A. Keene: "He was county attorney when I came to Brainerd. later he became circuit judge. Judge Holland was connected with many business enterprises. He was always public spirited, generous and good hearted. People called him lucky, but he was far-sighted. Land which he purchased from us at $6 an acre he sold later for $300."
                           _____

                       Proclamation

      All business places that can arrange to do so are requested to close Friday afternoon between the hours of 2:30 and 4 P. M. in honor of the memory of the Late Judge G. W. Holland, and all flags on public buildings are requested to be placed at half mast.
                                           H. P. DUNN.
                                                 Mayor.
(Brainerd Daily Dispatch, 24 April 1913, p. 5, c. 1) [Contributed by John Van Essen]


        JUDGE HOLLAND'S
                          BROAD GENEROSITY
                            _____

       Bequest to City of Land Believed to
            be Worth Enough to Pay all
                        City's Debts
                            _____

          HE REMEMBERS OLD FRIENDS
                            _____

       Every Church Having Church Build-
           ing, Holding Regular Services,
                       Given $1,000

      There was filed in the probate court on Wednesday, April 30, the last will and testament of the late Judge George W. Holland. Marked by the broad generosity, in which love of friends is equally exemplified with love for his home city of Brainerd, in which churches of the city, the Carnegie library and the Salvation Army share equally as well as the Masonic order, in which kindred are remembered. In fact, Judge Holland's will is a document the like of which has never been seen.
      It is a document full of human interest and reading its paragraphs one traces readily the quaint phraseology of the judge. He remembers this and that friend and writes how he became acquainted with him, what service may have been rendered him and he shows his gratitude by the bequest he has penned.
      It is a will which carries more permanent blessings to a greater number of people than any other donation ever given in the state. By the provisions of the will virtually every person, every church organization having a building and holding regular church services, becomes a beneficiary. Every individual in Brainerd will have cause to remember with thanksgiving the wise and beneficent provisions embodied in the will and Judge George W. Holland stands enshrined in the hearts of the citizens of the city he loved so well and of which community he was a leading factor for 41 years.
      Greater than any monument that can be reared in his honor is the feeling of gratitude inspired in and perpetuated in the citizens by his good deeds. He has passed away but the good he has done will live after him for ages to come.
      The will reads:
                        THE WILL
      In the name of God, Amen.
      I, George W. Holland, of the City of Brainerd, in the County of Crow Wing and State of Minnesota, being of sound mind and memory, and considering the uncertainty of this frail and transitory life, do therefore make, ordain, publish and declare this to be my last will and testament.
      First, I order and direct that my executors hereinafter named, pay all my just debts and funeral expenses as soon after my decease as conveniently may be.
      Second, after the payment of said funeral expense and debts, I give, devise and bequeath to all the Masonic Lodges of the City of Brainerd in the county of Crow Wing and State of Minnesota, of which I am a member, one thousand (1000) dollars, to be equally divided between said lodges.
      To each church organization or society having a church building in the city of Brainerd and holding Christian services therein weekly, on Sundays or otherwise, one thousand (1000) dollars. This includes the Salvation Army.
      To Dr. James L. Camp, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars. To his prompt action, ability as a physician and his close attention to my case, I believe I have had a continued lease on life since my accident on November 2nd, 1889.
      To Dr. A. F. Groves, specialist, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To George P. Willson [sic], of Minneapolis, Hennepin county, Minnesota, ex-Attorney general of this state, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars. The first court work he did after his first election was to assist me as county attorney of Crow Wing county to try a murder case. The friendship then formed ever since has and now does continue.
      To John R. Donahue, of St. Paul, Ramsey County, Minnesota, ex-County Attorney of Itasca County, now practicing law in St. Paul, Minnesota, with offices in the Pioneer Press building, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To W. W. Hartley, my first acquaintance in Brainerd, Minnesota, and ever since my good friend, now of Mountain View, California, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To George D. LaBar, my nephew, if living at the time of my death, all my stock—two hundred (200) shares—in the First National Bank of Brainerd, Minnesota, of which he is now President, additional to what he otherwise receives of my estate.
      To Lawyer W. H. Crowell, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To Lawyer W. A. Fleming, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To Lawyer C. C. McCarthy, of Grand Rapids, Itasca County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To Lawyer C. L. Pratt, of Grand Rapids, Itasca County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To Lawyer F. W. Hall, of Aitkin, Aitkin County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To R. P. Nelson, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota who has taken care of my office and room for more than twenty years last past, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To Adam Brown, of Brainerd, Crow Wing county, Minnesota, who has taken care of the heating plant in the First National bank building of Brainerd, for about twenty years last past, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To Winifred V. Small, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars. Said Winifred V. Small is stenographer for Mantor & Ebner, and for many years last past has done much of my work on her typewriter and always pleased me with her correctness and pleasant ways.
      To Florene G. Merritt [niece of Charles F. Kindred], now residing at No. 2215 Federal Avenue, Seattle, in the State of Washington, with her sister Mrs. Nellie K. Merritt Strawbridge [niece of Charles F. Kindred], and teaching in the public schools of that city, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      I was acquainted with Mr. and Mrs. [Cornelia J. Kindred] Merritt [sister of Charles F. Kindred] and family from the time of their arrival in Brainerd. After the death of Mr. Merritt his widow remained in the same house with the family. A few months before her death, while talking to me, she said—"My husband and oldest daughter Minnie are dead, my oldest boy is in New Haven [graduated from Yale], my other boy is in Tacoma, my remaining two daughters and I are here in Brainerd." "Mr. Holland," she said, "you have been a friend of our family since we came here. Promise me if I am suddenly taken away that you will help Nellie and Florene [sic] financially, while single, if they are in need." I promised, but did not think her serious as she seemed in good health. Soon after, I was informed that Mrs. Merritt was dead. Florene [sic] is still single, and her sister Nellie's husband is a model Christian gentleman but not strong financially.
      To Hilda E. Carlson of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, two hundred (200) dollars. Said Hilda E. Carlson is a stenographer and has done considerable typewriting for me.
      To T. C. Blewitt, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To S. F. Alderman, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To W. H. Mantor, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To F. E. Ebner, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To A. D. Polk, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To W. S. McClenahan, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To George W. Moody, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To J. H. Warner, of Brainerd, Crow Wing county, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To A. J. Halstead, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To F. W. Wieland, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To N. H. Ingersoll, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To M. E. Ryan, Lawyer, of Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To H. C. Stivers, of Superior, Wisconsin, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To R. H. Carr, N. P. locomotive engineer, now residing in St. Paul, Minn., if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      To T. H. Brady, N. P. locomotive engineer, of Brainerd, Minnesota, if living at the time of my death, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      All the rest, residue and remainder of my real and personal property, I give, devise and bequeath to the children of my deceased brother and deceased sisters living at the time of my death, to share and share alike.
      The child of my deceased sister Jane and husband Lewis Lord, now living, is Mrs. Clara E. Lord Luse [sic], now of Eugene, Oregon. The children of my deceased sister Helen and husband Newell Spencer, now living are Harman W. Spencer, of Malone, N. Y., and Leafy Spencer Fizzell, of No. 123 Sharon street, Montreal, Canada. The child of my deceased sister Mary and husband D. D. LaBar, is George D. LaBar, now President of the First National Bank of Brainerd, Minnesota. The children of my deceased brother Stanford C. Holland and wife, are Stelis [sic] Holland Person, of Minot, North Dakota, and Mary Holland Church, of Long Prairie, Todd County, Minnesota.
      The value of real estate in Crow Wing County, Minnesota, is now changing so quickly and unexpectedly, that I desire and I hereby request that none of the real property of which I died seized shall be sold or divided among those entitled thereto until after the expiration of five years after my decease, except lots on the corner of Front Street and Broadway, in Brainerd, Minnesota, may be sold at any time. Sales are wholly in the discretion of executors after said five years.
      I give, devise and bequeath to the city of Brainerd, in Crow Wing County, State of Minnesota, the South half of the Southeast quarter (S1/2 of SE1/4) of section nineteen (19), in township forty-five (45) north, of range thirty (30) west, in Crow Wing County, Minnesota. From my examination of blue prints of drill holes on adjacent lands, and the use of dip needles thereon, I guess there will be mineral enough found in said land to pay all the indebtedness of the City of Brainerd, but at this time it is only a guess.
      Lastly, I make, constitute and appoint Arthur B. Church, husband of my deceased brother's girl Mary, and George D. LaBar, son of my deceased sister Mary, to be Executors of this my last will and testament, hereby revoking all former wills by me made.
      In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal, the 14th day of January in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and thirteen.
(Seal)                          GEO. W. HOLLAND.
      This Instrument was, on the day of the date thereof, signed, published and declared by the said Testator, George W. Holland, to be his last will and testament in our presence, who, at his request, have subscribed our names thereto as witnesses, in his presence and in the presences of each other.
                                    B. L. Lagerquist,
      residing at Brainerd, Minnesota
                                    F. A. Farrar,
      residing at Brainerd, Minnesota
                           CODICIL.
In the Name of God, Amen.
      I, George W. Holland, of the city of Brainerd, in the County of Crow Wing and State of Minnesota, being of sound mind and memory, and considering the uncertainty of this frail and transitory life, do therefore make, ordain, publish and declare this to be a codicil to my Last Will and Testament, and supplementary and additional thereto.
      I give, devise and bequeath to the City of Brainerd, in Crow Wing county and State of Minnesota, Tract nine (9) and Tract ten (10) in Holland's Third Addition to the city of Brainerd, according to the recorded plat thereof on file and of record in the office of the Register of Deeds of Crow Wing County in the State of Minnesota.
      To George D. LaBar, my library, furniture, wearing apparel, watch and family Bible, now in my room, office and vault.
      Edward E. [sic] Day, conductor, running passenger train out of Brainerd, five hundred (300) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      F. B. Desch, conductor, running passenger train out of Brainerd, five hundred (500) dollars if living at the time of my death.
      Harry S. McLagan, conductor, running passenger train out of Brainerd, five hundred (500) dollars if living at the time of my death.
      John C. Conant, of 910 South Seventh Street, Brainerd, Minnesota, one thousand (1000) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      To Orlando LaBar, of Lansing, Minnesota, brother of Geo. D. LaBar's deceased father, one thousand (1000) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      Mrs. Caroline Grandelmyer, Sixth Street Milliner, Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      Carrie Morrison, Rachel Morrison's daughter, two hundred (200) dollars if living at the time of my death.
      Rachel Morrison, Mrs. Grandelmyer's sister, two hundred (200) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      Jefferson P. Saunders, of Brainerd, Minnesota, five hundred (500) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      The Brainerd Carnegie Public Library, called "Brainerd Public Library," building on Seventh and Main Streets, Brainerd, Minnesota, one thousand (1000) dollars.
      David W. Northrup, of 918 Front Street, Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars if living at the time of my death.
      John A. Linn, of 1800 Oak Street East, Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      August Larson, of 712 South 19th Street, Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      George Swanson, of 804 South 19th Street, Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      Henry W. Greener, of 814 South 19th Street, Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      E. B. Bentley, of 818 South 19th Street, Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars if living at the time of my death.
      Emil Anderson, of 705 South 19th Street, Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      John Jorgensen, of 1912 East Oak Street, Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      Stinzle [sic] Brose, of East Oak Street, Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      Andrew J. Wright, of East Oak Street, Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      Peter C. Madsen, residing on Tract 9, Holland's First Addition to the City of Brainerd, Minnesota, two hundred (200) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      John T. Sanborn, of 508 Juniper Street, Brainerd, Minnesota, five hundred (500) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      P. V. Copperoll, Attorney-at-Law, of Park Rapids, Hubbard County, Minnesota, five hundred (500) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      Rev. Daniel W. Lynch, formerly rector of St. Francis Catholic church of this city, now of Duluth, Minnesota, five hundred (500) dollars, if living at the time of my death.
      In Testimony Whereof, I have hereunto subscribed my name and affixed my seal, the third day of April, in the year of our Lord one thousand nine hundred and thirteen (1913)
                      GEORGE W. HOLLAND (Seal)
      This Instrument was, on the day of the date thereof, signed, published and declared by the said Testator, to be a codicil to his Last Will and Testament, in our presence, who, at his request, have subscribed our names thereto as witnesses, in his presence, and in the presence of each other.
                                    B. L. Lagerquist,
      residing at Brainerd, Minnesota
                                    A. C. Mraz
      residing at Brainerd, Minnesota
      The estimated value of the estate at this time is $152,000 in personal property and $150,000 in real estate. The latter, however, may show a considerable increase.
      Mrs. Clara E. Lord Luce [sic], one of residuary legatees, passed away in January of this year and her share reverts to the remaining legatees. (Brainerd Daily Dispatch, 01 May 1913, p. 3, c. 1) [Contributed by John Van Essen]

06 July 1915. Col. Freeman Thorp of Hubert has finished the portrait of the late Judge G. W. Holland and it is on display at Dunn Drug. Thorp worked from two photos of Holland and he is recognized in America and Europe as a master in this art. He has painted presidents, diplomats and others of renown. (This Was Brainerd, Brainerd Dispatch, 06 July 2015)


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  • Created by: A. Nelson
  • Added: 25 Jul 2011
  • Find A Grave Memorial 73930713
  • Find A Grave, database and images (https://www.findagrave.com : accessed ), memorial page for Judge George W. Holland (23 Mar 1843–23 Apr 1913), Find A Grave Memorial no. 73930713, citing Evergreen Cemetery, Brainerd, Crow Wing County, Minnesota, USA ; Maintained by A. Nelson (contributor 47143984) .